How's THIS for a Bad Dog post?!

G.Rotten

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Feb 18, 2010
Posts
2,379
Location
CoolsVille
The dog is vaxed and has been inside for years.
I think I bled enough to clean the wound :eek:
So far, it doesn't hurt any more than if a grown man stabbed me in the back of the hand with a screwdriver.
Ooooh...I just thought of that scene from Goodfellas...
I dunno, I feel like the amount of pain from being stabbed in the hand with a screwdriver would still be a significant amount of pain.
 

moosie

Doctor of Teleocity
Silver Supporter
Joined
Jul 18, 2010
Posts
19,778
Age
65
Location
Western Connecticut
What about "do not touch the dog" didn't you understand?

Good dog. Ahh, kidding. Hope your hand is alright.

When I was young I rented a room with this highly dysfunctional family. They had a HUGE German Shepard named "Leafy". Evil Beast From Hell would have been more accurate.

I'm in the camp that all dogs are good. Still need to beware of traumatized dogs, and maybe very old dogs with pain, blindness, hearing loss, etc. But in this case, it wasn't the dog that was traumatized. It was everyone else.

They had this tiny, narrow kitchen counter against the wall, with stools where you'd pull up and eat breakfast. No room underneath. Well, my first day, Leafy takes this opportunity to ensure I'm aware that the bottom rung of the pecking ladder is mine, and mine alone. I didn't see him coming. Somehow he got his big frame under there. I first noticed the warmth on my crotch. The fleeting "hey, that feels pretty good" disappeared when I looked down and saw those evil eyes looking up at me. He was looking in such a way that his eyes rolled up, while his mouth remained firmly planted you know where. As soon as I make eye contact, the growling starts. Too quiet for anyone but me to hear. Without moving quickly, I pleaded for help.

"Oh Leafy, stop that..."

Yeah Leafy. Stop that, and go play in traffic. Jeez.


Every time the family would go out, they'd barricade (I mean this literally) Leafy in the kitchen. The door was a mess from the constant battering. I was witness to this - after the family left, it was as if I wasn't there. His sole focus, and the outlet for immense rage, was to break down the door. Which he eventually did. Every time. This had to be a 120 lb dog, and there was a good ten feet of runway to get up steam. He'd hit the door, hard. Repeatedly. Maybe fifteen minutes of this, and it would bust open, either breaking the lock, the door itself, or the bar they would try to place across it. Sometimes the entire door would just be sent flying, to lie flat on the hallway floor.

Successful, Leafy would then proceed to go upstairs and take a dump on each family member's bed. Never mine. Just his captors.


Last story: one day Leafy got out, and was cruising the neighborhood, looking for prey. Next thing we knew, there's a knock on the front door, and it's a nicely dressed gentleman, with a briefcase, umbrella, and bowler hat (really) who was walking down the sidewalk, on his way to the train. (This was Swarthmore, PA, a nice tree-lined-street college town). Seems he had met Leafy on the sidewalk, reached down to give him a pat, and >CLAMP< the dog got his entire hand in those massive jaws, and refused to give it back. Then he brought him home. A new toy? Can I keep it?

I have no idea why they kept the dog. I can't imagine the hate going through that dog's mind. And why? They never once mistreated him - nor would they have.

Reminds me of the Far Side cartoon, where we get to hear what dogs call themselves. He would have been The Grand Rex, Sh*tter of Beds.
 

dkmw

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Mar 30, 2016
Posts
6,108
Age
66
Location
Florida USA
Not quite the same thing, but…

I knew a guy who had a very well trained pit. I first got to know the dog in his house, and he could be a sweetie when he wanted. At some point the guy started putting him on a chain by his front door for security, and trained him thus:

The dog was to go all aggro when anyone approached; if released from the chain it was up to the dog to decide how to act. If he knew you, you were good. If not, who knows…

It was always a moment to pull up, get out of the car to a snarling, frothing ball of muscle and teeth, and the have my friend release him off the chain and watch the dog transform into a friend. I never quite got completely comfortable with it.
 

G.Rotten

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Feb 18, 2010
Posts
2,379
Location
CoolsVille
Yeah, sometimes elderly dogs can just be cranky or psycho, even when the owners have done everything right.
When I was a kid we had a Golden Retriever. One weekend we went away and thought the trip might be too much for him (he was around 10 years old I think) & had the neighbors taking care of him.

He'd known them his whole life so it should have been fine. When let out to do his business he decided to run home to our house to lay under our car. When he wouldn't come out she reached in and he bit her. Wouldn't let go at first. That was where he wanted to be and that's what he wanted to do. That sounds like a lot of people when they reach a certain point in their lives.

If someone says don't touch the old dog, just assume they had a reason to say it.

But I still think that if you've had problems before you should assume you will again and remove the dog from potential problems when you can.

We put ours down after that. It seemed wrong but not wrong. It was tough. If we had any idea that might happen we would have done things different.
 

6stringcowboy

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Sep 14, 2014
Posts
2,342
Location
Central North Carolina
Not quite the same thing, but…

I knew a guy who had a very well trained pit. I first got to know the dog in his house, and he could be a sweetie when he wanted. At some point the guy started putting him on a chain by his front door for security, and trained him thus:

The dog was to go all aggro when anyone approached; if released from the chain it was up to the dog to decide how to act. If he knew you, you were good. If not, who knows…

It was always a moment to pull up, get out of the car to a snarling, frothing ball of muscle and teeth, and the have my friend release him off the chain and watch the dog transform into a friend. I never quite got completely comfortable with it.
I have a 125 lb. Great Pyrenees and he's funny like that. If he is in our house or in one of our cars, you won't be able to approach without him going full Cujo but if you meet him outside, he's friendly to 99%. He is a guard dog after all, he takes his job seriously.
 




New Posts

Top