How would you shape these headstocks 3 at a time?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by BeeTL, Jul 19, 2009.

  1. BeeTL

    BeeTL Tele-Holic

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    How would you shape these headstocks if you had 3+ to do?

    That's how I plan to do these, in small groups, shaped from Allparts or USACG necks.

    I'd like to achieve as little variation as possible; you can see my first two guitar headstocks are slightly different.

    A pin router, standing drill press or CNC are not options, space is limited to smaller power tools (router, scroll saw, etc.).

    In my mind the areas of concern for tearout are the end of the headstock and the "mouth" of the cutout which has a 1/4" inside diameter.

    How would you do it?

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    Last edited: Jul 19, 2009
  2. Nash

    Nash Tele-Holic

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    Use a template? I'm not sure there is any good way to cut them out more than one at a time without ending up with a lot of tearouts.

    I'm not sure you'd save much time either because you'd have to have them all clamped together which would take quite a bit of time. Then you'd have to cut far slower because of the amount of wood you need to cut through and the fact that you have to be more careful. Going slower then increases the risk of tearouts and burns.

    I'd say make a good template and do each one individually. I like the design BTW it's cool in a sorta Danelectro way.
     
  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'd use a drill bit for the inside curve diameter and then template rout the rest after cutting near the final shape on a bandsaw. You might have to go to a 3/8" dia pattern bit and do a little shaping by hand at what the router can't do.
     
  4. crussell

    crussell Tele-Meister

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    If the tuner hole pattern is the same on all 3, I would make a template (like others are suggesting) out of 3/4" mdf and mount it from the back with bolts through the 2 E string tuner holes. You could counter sink a few bolts on the back of the template so that it runs flat against your router and by using the tuner holes as your lineup point for the pattern to the neck, you would ensure that every neck lines up the same way as long as the tuner holes were consistently spaced. You could also build a safety stops into the template to make sure you never never got the router bit anywhere near the parts of the neck you didn't want to touch (i.e. quick flare-off's at 90 degrees away from the neck) and then do any blending into the existing shape by sanding.
     
  5. Jack Wells

    Jack Wells Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Do you really think there's a need to shape them three at a time?
     
  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I was thinking a lot of 3 , routing them one at a time.
     
  7. TELE_BLUES

    TELE_BLUES Tele-Afflicted

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    I just can't get over the feeling that this needs to somehow be incorporated into that design. [​IMG]
     
  8. BeeTL

    BeeTL Tele-Holic

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    Yes.

    Language (or my use of it) can be very imprecise.

    I've edited the thread title to be more clear.

    What I'm asking is, if I want to set the "shop" up to do 3 of these at a setting, one by one, what would be the easiest and most efficeient way to go about doing it?

    I've read Ron Kirn's tutorial on headstock reshaping, and a template and router seems like the way to go.

    That said, I have been told that with my design I should be concerned about tearout at the tip of the headstock and also at the mouth due to cross grain issues.

    What do you think?
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2009
  9. PennyCentury

    PennyCentury Poster Extraordinaire

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    Another "churchkey" headstock design, this one by Perry Ormsby

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  10. eric_o

    eric_o TDPRI Member

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    I knew that headstock was making me thirsty.
     
  11. Shepherd

    Shepherd Friend of Leo's

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    Make three templates and head for the router, or you can make one template and use dowels the same size as the tuner holes to locate it. No need to screw and unscrew each time, let friction do the work.
     
  12. BeeTL

    BeeTL Tele-Holic

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    Those Ormsby guitars are exactly what I'm getting at:

    How do you make those fine inside cuts repeatedly with precision?

    What's the best tool(s) for the job?

    Pattern bits don't seem to go to 1/4" diameter, and also seem risky for tearout.

    What's the "secret" to the small diameter inside cut?
     
  13. ehawley

    ehawley Tele-Afflicted

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    CNC....(or a small spindle sander)
     
  14. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Doctor of Teleocity

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    If you can do one you can do three. No problem.

    Routing skills will help you do the tight corners without tearout.
     
  15. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Attach template to the back of the headstock with double sided tape (here's the trick to stop it slipping: use a quick-clamp as a press to fasten the tape once it's in place by clamping and then releasing, clamping and releasing. It'll stick so well, you'll have a hard time removing it) and use a 1/2" diameter pattern bit for all except the sharpest radius.

    Leave the template on and use a drill bit wrapped in 120 grit on the drill press to do the sharper radius.
     
  16. edd677

    edd677 Tele-Meister

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    From my experience it is a lot easier to shape a headstock when starting a neck from scratch rather than shaping a headstock on a neck already made. You might want to start building your own, cheaper in the long run if your going to make lots and you can get them all exact.
     
  17. BeeTL

    BeeTL Tele-Holic

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    A member over at Reranch posted these drawings, and I think I like this better than the router table approach.

    What do you guys think?

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  18. Shepherd

    Shepherd Friend of Leo's

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    I already mentioned that.
     
  19. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Just do it!
     
  20. muttley

    muttley TDPRI Member

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    To cut tight radii most would use a pin router and the appropriate pin and radius bit. That is if you don't have access to cnc.

    Frankly I would concentrate my effort on cutting them one at a time really well rather than doing three in quick succession. Once you have got it down for one really cut well it's just a matter of repeating as many times as required. Thats what every guitar maker does whether they have a production line of hundreds using cnc or one at a time by hand. Accuracy and speed comes with years of practice and attention to detail.
     
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