How would you recommend I learn

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by rxtech, Apr 14, 2019.

  1. MilwMark

    MilwMark Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Why when the OP says “I can’t afford a teacher” are easily half of the suggestions “find a good teacher”?

    Anyway, working your way through Justinguitar.com online would be systematic and produce good results.

    Same with anyonecanplayguitar.co.uk.

    Both are a good mix of songs and applied theory.

    I also like yourguitarsage and guitarlessins365 for learning specific songs.

    All four of them are practical. The first two give the most theory.

    I think all are free.
     
  2. ASATKat

    ASATKat Tele-Afflicted

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    • Have fun,

    •• Take breaks before burning out

    ••• End practice times on a WIN, don't walk away bummed, go back and find a place so you can end on the win, it's so important.

    •••• Use a metronome, it's as important as anything else. After 55 yrs of playing, I have my metronome 2 ft from me as I'm writing this.
     
  3. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

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    lessons and working with another doesn't mean MONEY or lots of money.

    lessons is an investment.

    Find a way, find a friend, you are stuck and need some personal direction

    You may only need 2, 3 or 4 lessons.

    You need feedback , U Tube can't give you feedback.

    Sorry for being so direct.

    So instead we have many many opinions on what to do.

    So what should he do ? Who's advice should he follow ? Whos offering the advice ? Who is going to actually help him progress and offer immediate feedback ?

    Thats all I am saying.

    over and out
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019
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  4. ASATKat

    ASATKat Tele-Afflicted

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    In my opinion, it's up to him to become his own personal best teacher, we need to make wise choices and always be the final word in our goal. No one can empower you in this more than you.

    Many "teachers" barely know fundamentals as they look on paper. They may advertise you don't need all those scales and chords, but in the end you're just giving them your money. So learn how to get the appropriate teacher that really has the goods and knows how to teach. Ask music stores.

    To be honest, after spending over a decade on the gear page in their playing and technique forum, it was one of the best things I've done in my learning. I discussed everything I learned in college 100x over. And then I learned there is a whole other world of music and how it all works that will keep me interested long after I'm gone.

    I highly suggest you not only ask for advice, but rather ask this forum. In quick time you will understand the gradient from fundamental to advanced and the whole reality of the bigger picture will come into focus. Sound will develope, like hearing the difference between a maj7 chord and a min7 chord. So put ear training somewhere on your daily routine.

    Also, there is nothing in advanced that is more complicated to learn than there is in the basics. Advanced means you just have more tools. So many people liken advanced music to high algebra. I'm here to tell you,,, algebra is way harder, and it has no musical outcome.

    So what style of music do you want to focus on? And are you interested in the theory behind chords and progressions? Or are you interested in shred. I ask because this is how little I know about you.

    This forum is a goldmine for someone wanting to advance.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019
  5. adjason

    adjason Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Embrace the chords you know and focus on writing original songs. The other big advice is get a looper pedal and practice playing leads over various chord progressions
     
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  6. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire

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    This thread has a lot of advice. It's all pretty useful if you want it to be.

    I too am in the "find a good teacher" camp but if you can't afford it right now - no problem, there are still many ways to get better ...

    1) Find some tunes that you like but that are a bit "out of your comfort zone". You can probably find a backing track on YouTube to jam along with.
    2) Find some musicians that are better than you to jam with.
    3) Join a band.
    4) Try learning a new and/or different music style. Maybe some country fingerpicking or African guitar or Bossa Nova, Flamenco, Slide guitar or dare I say some Jazz or Metal guitar. Anything to give yourself something "new" to work on. *It'll help all the other stuff you already know.

    As for YT instructional vids I like the Rick Beato stuff. He's kinda all over the place with technique, gear, theory, history, interviews, etc. but he really knows his $h1t.

    Maybe step one can be "soloing without using the pentatonic scale" Think Dickey Betts (Jessica) to start.
    Step two could be learn a song that doesn't use (too many) barre chords or cowboy chords. Steely Dan, later Doobies, later Beatles, Rush, Genesis, Yes or how about a soul/jazz Kenny Burrell tune: Chitlin's Con Carne or anything off of Midnight Blue.
     
  7. Bluey

    Bluey Tele-Meister

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    I've had this laying around for a while. I was in the same boat as you and used this as my basic reference to blow the cobwebs off. Maybe somewhere to start…. Note how everything is associated with a pattern makes things easier.


    At lease 1 Hour a week with Ernie Ball Phase 1&2
    Assuming you know open chords & moving bar chords up a fret = # down = b

    At least ½ Hour on these. With I-IV-V progressions to start with.
    upload_2019-4-16_13-26-28.png
    For Power Chords Form 1 - strings 6/5/4 only Maj or Minor.
    For Power Chords Form 2 - strings 5/4/3 only Maj or Minor.
    Simples!

    At least ½ hour a week on these.

    A scale for FORM 1 BAR CHORDS
    upload_2019-4-16_13-27-5.png
    A scale for FORM 2 BAR CHORDS
    upload_2019-4-16_13-27-44.png

     

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    Last edited: Apr 16, 2019
  8. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    I liked working with teachers at all stages of my career. After the first year, I began to direct the lessons, in terms of content and goals. In my second year, I wanted to be able to play like Freddie Green, and my teacher helped with that. Then, I wanted to master the fingerboard and all of the scales (well, lots of them). Then pure finger independence and strength building. Then jazz improv. Then composition.

    All you need to do is save up for 3-4 lessons, and do research in your area. Make sure that what you want to learn is something that he/she has experience with.

    Until then, you could do worse than searching for things in music that are fun to play and musically rewarding. Just focus on what you consider to be the fun stuff, or dessert, or whatever. Getting your learning fire lit, and keeping it lit, is by far the most important thing. Nothing motivates like burning desire.
     
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  9. Bluey

    Bluey Tele-Meister

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    +1 on what adjason said. Laying down progressions on a looper and inventing your own chord combinations. Then practicing lead over the top draws me back to my music room. Surprising what you can come up with using a few basic chords & a couple of scales. I tried not to let this distract me from a 2+ hour practice regime though.
    Anyway, best of luck what ever you choose.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2019
  10. kbold

    kbold Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Good advice from ASATKat.

    Start with what you already have at hand.

    Use the chord book to progress beyond cowboy chords.
    Experiment with chords you may not have used. Find which chords work well with these.
    No need to follow the herd - some freestyle experimenting can be fun and take you to places you've never been. See what works with Maj7, Sus, diminished, and augmented chords. Seems you have a paint box, but are only using 3 of the colours.

    Experiment with different tempos and and strumming patterns. Try and produce a flamenco or a jazzy feel to a chord progression (or some beat that could only emanate from sleazy smoke-filled nightclub - i.e. visualise)

    Try practising without a pick - just use your fingers. This way you can combine stumming, picking multiple strings at once, double or triple stops, arpeggios, and that fantastic lead break without losing your rhythm and momentum. This way your practice is combining chord and lead work.

    Get those notes shimmering with some bends, double string bends, and vibrato. (Not too much, or it starts sounding silly.)

    Experiment with different scales and modes.
    If you're playing a blues song in E, try using the Dorian mode (which is the minor pentatonic +2 +6).
    Now your blues riff has 2 extra notes to play with.
    Myxolydian mode is popular with Country, Rock and Blues. Its the major scale with a flat 7th.
    If you're playing some soppy love song, throw in a natural minor lick, and watch the tears flow.
    Always pay attention to the 3rd note of the scale. All major scales have a normal 3rd (4 semitones above the root). All minor scales have a flat 3rd (3 semitones above root). i.e. you wouldn't normally hit a flat 3rd in a happy/upbeat song.

    By all means, go down the internet rabbit hole but don't get lost down there.
    Dive in for a specific purpose, then come out and apply.

    Practice, and have fun!
     
  11. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

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    Working with a quality teacher will prevent us from forming bad habits that can take years to reverse , if at all. Working with a quality teacher, even a few times, will prevent a player of 20 years from repeating the first year 20 times.

    Immediate feedback is worth the price of admission.

    I'm not saying weekly lessons, of which I actually do not recommend. Lessons should be pursued when we are READY for the next step, which more often than not is way more than 1 week. It could be 3 months. It could be 6 months. But thats how we grow, we add to what we know very well.

    How many times have we run across players who said they have been playing 10,15 or 20 years, then when they perform we kinda say to ourselves, really ?

    Learning how to LEARN is very difficult, a quality teacher can show us how to LEARN properly, a poor teacher or doing it on our own with no guidance may have us all over the map with very limited progress. Learning is a slow deliberate process.

    12 years of grade school , 4, 6 or 8 years of college and only those who actually learn how to study and what to study make it to the top of the class.

    As a player of over 40 years, fortunately while I was studying on my own learning all sorts of songs as a teen, I also took Orchestral Chord theory from the local Jazz guy. Chords and the root scales they were derived from. No Beatles , No Blues , No Stones , no licks , After about 2 years I thought it was a waste of time so I stopped.

    My first 20 years I ignored all of my formal training , and just played Pentatonic licks as loud as I could. I repeated the first year 20 times. The next 20 years I went back to my roots. The fretboard is not a mystery, pretty much everything I do now goes back to those early days where I thought it was a waste of time. Thank God I spent those two years with the local Jazz guy , the door was wide open but I decided to take another route. While I had fun, I wasn't really learning anything new or paying attention. BUT I knew there was a void. It showed in my playing.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2019
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  12. colchar

    colchar Friend of Leo's

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    justinguitar.com

    Follow his lesson plans.
     
  13. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

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    While I totally support doing much on our own and with NET lessons, there are a few things which require someone else's eyes to SEE what you are doing and comment.

    Not that I am the cats meows , I'm not, but there are some things I have learned to do using various fingering and chord shapes. I have a couple of excellent player friends who play similar phrasings but they struggle ( work too hard ) from chord shape to chord shape here and there. I will show them a few simple changes to the way they approach a chord and usually the response is, wow, I can play it smoothly now . "I never thought of doing it that way " It s not so much about teaching a chord or phrase as it may be about recognizing the struggle to put things together and making a simple suggestion with regard to fingering . This is where a teacher can identify a few things to make life on the fretboard easier.

    The fingering chord shape of chord A leads to chord B which leads to chord C and so on and so on. The fingering of phrase A leads to phrase B which leads to phrase C and so on and so on. If we start in an awkward position, everything that follows most likely will be awkward. Its probable that another set of eyes can minimize or eliminate the "awkward" positions, otherwise we may practice like this for 10 years !

    When I did teach Steel and / or guitar, I don't think I taught any licks or phrases but rather where they laid on the fretboard in multiple positions . While the E9th Pedal Steel tuning is far different than the standard 6 string tuning, there is an inherent comparison of chord shapes which makes life really simple on both. Depending on where we start that is.


    When we take video or NET lessons and they show us a phrase, whats missing is the extra conversation. "this shape or phrase by the way leads to this shape or phrase" Sometimes it's THAT discussion where a practicing player learns the most. Then that discussion leads to yet another discussion. We are now learning the fretboard or changing the way we view the fretboard.

    thats all I am saying.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2019
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