How would you play this song on Guitar?

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by callasabra, Dec 27, 2017.

  1. callasabra

    callasabra Tele-Afflicted

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    This is a mixed bag of questions for tabs, tricks and techniques. My worship band wants to play this song and have asked that I play the pedal steel part.



    Chords are D, A, G, F#7

    So...
    how do I play this on guitar and sound like a pedal steel?
    Anyone care to tab it out?
    Any tricks or techniques to play this song? It is Southern Gospel style and I have never played Southern Gospel.

    I have never played a pedal steel before, nor do I own one. I have never played slide before either. I get the volume swells and delay/echo/reverb. Could I play this in standard tuning or should I change to a different tuning? It sounds like you slide into the notes, or is that just the volume swells or a combination of the two?
     
  2. screamin eagle

    screamin eagle Poster Extraordinaire

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    Bend to 6's and major 3rds.

    Take a simple major chord double stop or triad. Instead of playing the 3rd and 5th, play the 9th and 5th, but bend the 9th up to the 3rd.

    Play the tonic and 5th and then bend the 5th to the 6th.

    Then try to bend down to the tones too.

    Mess around with some of those ideas and you'll start to get a feel for a few basics.

    Oh, and I didn't listen to the song (yet, as I'm at work), but you can approximate a few steel ideas with those types of bends.
     
  3. callasabra

    callasabra Tele-Afflicted

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    Awesome. I will play around with that technique. Gonna require some thinking and creating new muscle memory.
     
  4. Pineears

    Pineears Tele-Afflicted

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    Check YouTube for B Bender Steel Guitar licks. You can do a portion of them without a B Bender.
     
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  5. Pineears

    Pineears Tele-Afflicted

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    Thanks, I like it, I’m going to learn it. Easy lead for a B Bender.
     
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  6. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    volume swells from 3+ into the 1 with lots of reverb

    solo should be easy to tab out, mostly double stops

    isn't Jamie Lin pretty, a good hard edge to her voice too

    a nice series of videos that never go full hipster

    Micah steals the show in one tune
     
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  7. codamedia

    codamedia Friend of Leo's

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    When I listen to that solo, standard turning will be fine... it's a pretty basic solo that will sit well on a guitar.

    Getting the "sound" is the tricky part. Steel players play really loud, and really clean. They use the volume pedal extensively... not just to swell the note in, but also to sustain the note. As the note decays they turn up the volume pedal giving the impression of a very long sustain. If they ever hit a hard note at full volume the would rip your head off!

    When I need to play steel parts on guitar (and want them fairly authentic) I apply these techniques with my gear.

    1: I use a compressor with judicious amounts of sustain. With a BOSS CS-3 (for example) I would turn the sustain up to at least noon, maybe a little more.
    2: I place a volume pedal AFTER the compressor. Use that to swell in the notes or at the very least, soften the attack of the notes. By placing it after the comp, I assure the comp is always in play!
    3: Turn up the reverb more than I normally would.
    4: I stay on the bridge pickup.

    After that it is technique which some have already made some suggestions for. IMO, you don't need a B Bender or anything special, just learn a few basic steel techniques for guitar. The opening lick for the solo is just that...

    1: Keep your pinky on the 10th fret of the B and High E string... strike these at the same time as you hit the note in step 2.
    2: Place your ring finger on the 9th Fret of the G string (E note) then after playing it bend it up 1 tone (F#... the third of D). This takes practice to get the timing and feel.
    3: Next... release that bend back down to the original note...
    4: Remove that ring finger and play the 7th fret of the G string (D note) with your index finger.
    5: Note: try to keep the 1st two notes applied in #1 sustaining through steps 2 - 4

    The majority of that solo is based on that lick... moved around and embellished just a little. If you combine that lick with the gear technique I mention you can easily play the steel part from this particular song.

    EDIT TO ADD: Here is a decent little video I just dug up on the style and technique... (note: you can use your pinky for the volume swell... I prefer a volume pedal)

     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2017
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  8. galen

    galen TDPRI Member

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    I play pedal steel in our band, but also do quite a bit of work on the Tele. If I was going to play steel on that song, I’d add more embellishment on the fills than the player in the video. The player uses mostly chord sustainment for backing the singer. I’d be doing more walk-ups and walk-downs between the chords to lead from one chord to the other, particularly going into the chorus. My volume would swell in the brief spaces between the vocals. You can achieve similar effects on the Tele by sliding double stop walk-ups and walk-downs on your 2d and 3d strings, 1st and 3d strings, or 1st and 2d strings. Like stated on other posts, you can bend at the end of these walk- ups and walk-downs into the IV, V, and I chords for added pedal steel effects, and use your volume pedal in the spaces between vocals and to sustain those bends.
     
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  9. Don Miller

    Don Miller Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    You can get a "steelish" sound by sliding the various inversions off a chord....for instance on the D, play second string third fret, fourth string fourth fret...slide to seventh fret on two and four, then to second string tenth fret, fourth string twelfth fret....do it in one motion, letting the notes ring...pick once and slide (no bottleneck...use your fingers)....

    you can substitute stuff like the tenth fret on strings one and two, 9 to 11 bend on the third string (the "Take it Easy" bend).

    You can also use diads rather than triads (ie first string tenth fret, third string 9-11 bend), or fourth string seventh fret, second string bent 5 to 7 (one of the basic b bender moves). Try this stuff in different combinations. You can also use these shapes/moves in different positions to do the chord changes.

    The steel player in the video follows the melody for his break, so you might try playing the melody bending into (up and down) and out of the notes...and then flesh it out with scale harmonies
     
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  10. Flyinlow

    Flyinlow Tele-Meister

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    A volume pedal and slide (and quite a bit of reverb) would be very useful on this one, along with the B-Bender-ish double stops already mentioned. Wonderful song!
     
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  11. SecretSquirrel

    SecretSquirrel Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Great suggestions here.

    Only in the last 2-3 years I've been experimenting a bit with emulating pedal steel techniques, and recently my favorite thing is, for example in D, bending up the 2nd and 3rd strings at the 6th fret, by a half step (one fret), to get the D and F# of a D chord.

    It's taking practice to get both ending pitches right, and it's a little different on each guitar. But it can be a nice touch, an ending to a phrase, etc., and I'm like, "Why didn't I discover and practice this 40 years ago?!"

    That might be more just a "guitar" thing than a pedal steel thing, but it's becoming part of my overall emulation efforts. That is, I'm not trying to exactly copy a pedal steel, but some of the "vocabulary" translates to 6-string pretty nicely.
     
  12. magicfingers99

    magicfingers99 Friend of Leo's

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    just dub it onto your mp3 player and fake it like ELO did in the 1970's. Try to remember to move your fingers around abit while its playing off of your mp3 player so it looks you are making the sounds.
     
  13. JL_LI

    JL_LI Friend of Leo's

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    I don't play worship but I do a fair bit of accompanying myself on vocals with my Telecaster. The piece you want to play has a real traditional country flavor and that's what I play. IMO there's no better guitar for what you are looking to do than a Telecaster. A flat pick has too hard an attack. Play finger style. Play off the chords. You don't always need to slide between notes. Sometimes just lifting a finger off a 4th or 6th can do it. Slide up. Lift fingers to go down. The bridge and neck pickups will sound good together, in series if you have a 4 way or S1 switch. Play double stops where you can. You don't need to sound like a pedal steel. You just need to sound good. Practice and creativity are key to that.
     
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