How would you handle this?

4wotitswurth

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On a lighter note… maybe ask if Kurt could sub for her…. What was it Death Proof?


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ZackyDog

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Maybe there are movies that influence bosses/managers where a customer (Clint Eastwood) orders a taxicab driver to step on it/put the pedal to the metal, so to speak?

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jackinjax

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I worked out of an office of nearly 60 people for 30 years and while I was always friendly and cordial I stayed way clear of all office squabbles and politics. I heard lots of gripes, and listened to loads of arguments but made it a point not to take anyone's side nor offer my advice. I figured I had nothing to gain and risked my own piece of mind and possibly my livelihood sticking my nose where it didn't belong.
My great grand daddy (our Big Daddy) had three dogs; two males and a female. Apparently the two males would get into fights over the female. I was at his house one day when they started fighting and I jumped out of my chair to break them up. Big Daddy grabbed my arm and said, "Leave 'em alone, son. They'll work it out and there ain't no sense in you getting bit over somebody else's fight".
 

JIMMY JAZZMAN

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Curious . . . . . by any chance is this a "millennial" situation?

Seriously, earlier generations knew that taking a position against the boss could lead to no good - - for the employee. But later generations came to believe in solidarity and are more inclined to risk their own employment for a coworker. I ask because I was in management for about 25 years, and I once saw young folk storm the executive wing with a petition demanding access to social media on company workstations. It didn't work. I was the IT Director. They were invited to investigate other employment opportunities. Or realize that they had it good and might want to save social media for their lunch break.
Oopps, I thought I was on my lunch break. Be back in a couple hours.
 

schmee

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It's just totally unfair. The guy is an exec but is too cheap to get an Uber to catch his effing Limo? Are you kidding me?
She needs to get a pocket recorder & have it on the whole time. Make notes and prepare to get awarded a million in her lawsuit.

Meanwhile, either find a good job somewhere or find some good excuses to not be his "driver" anymore.
 

41144

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Similar to some of the above ...

Sounds like Boss sees himself as the big hot-shot whereas actually - Boss clearly needs telling to organise his time better.

Driver needs to point this out - that to get there on time you gotta leave on time ... which does not mean at the last minute.

Driver should never compromise bosses poor time keeping with their own driving standards (let alone those of any local ordinances)

If in driving 'correctly' said boss is late one of these times ... bet he won't pull that one again!
 

Killing Floor

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Driving fast is better than driving slowly. Fact backed by decades of science.

But it is not fair to impose procrastination on others. So she needs to say that next time. Please give me 5 more minutes or something like that. I hate being late. Makes my teeth hurt. But I’m not going to plan for a bus to drive faster just because I don’t want to leave on time.
 

0SubSeanik0

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a) She needs to discuss this with him... calmly, and not in a "this is the last straw" type of moment. If he's too wrapped up in his own business to make a point of getting there early, then he's probably too wrapped up to notice that the effort to get him there is an issue. Yes, he should, but that's a whole other conversation. I know it doesn't sound "fair," but she needs to approach this with empathy for him if she has any hope that he reciprocates. As a former supervisor of 13, this approach always spoke to me... it comes off much less as a demand/accomodation by an employee, and much more as an attempt to solve an issue (which I am always instantly on board with).

b) Once she identifies the issue with him, one idea for a solution might be to ask him to agree to some way to establish an objective, absolute "wheels up" time (Google Maps, or maybe something like a hard 15 minutes prior to limo departure, etc.). This would remove everyone's feelings from the whole equation, and puts the responsibility on both of them to leave by that set time, or not.

I wish her well!
 

Trenchant63

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Hello and thanks for reading.

This is a story that involved a co-worker and our boss/director.

The boss would sometimes need a ride to the CT limousine/limo station on his way to one of the NYC airports. He would call on my co-worker (Brooke) regularly to do this. The problem is, he would leave the office at the last possible moment, so that he could catch the limo in time, forcing her to drive like a bat out of hades, so to speak. Brooke told me about how she hated this ritual. I told her to speak out about it. It wasn't fair to her, her driving record, not to mention the others on the road.

What would you do?
Brooke to boss: “Glad to drive you to the limo station but I’ll need to leave with lead-time of Google maps route + min 10 minutes, otherwise I can’t. Rushing there is putting stress on me and putting my driving record and my life (and others’ lives) at risk. Ok? (Make sure he acknowledges it and agrees)”
 
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SRHmusic

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I'm with @schmee on this. What kind of operation is it where the boss can't hire a car or the limo from the office and expense it with his boss's approval?

If Brooke actually wants to do this, at minimum she should have a letter stating the company insurance is covering her and her car (may be part of the company CGL coverage?), and she should be getting the federal mileage rate reimbursement (about $0.62/mile last I checked) for each trip. Finally, in no way should she jeopardize her driving record. Laying all that out to the boss should make him think.

Or maybe she should just trade in her car for a dirt bike or scooter. :p
(edited to update the rate)
 
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String Tree

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Hello and thanks for reading.

This is a story that involved a co-worker and our boss/director.

The boss would sometimes need a ride to the CT limousine/limo station on his way to one of the NYC airports. He would call on my co-worker (Brooke) regularly to do this. The problem is, he would leave the office at the last possible moment, so that he could catch the limo in time, forcing her to drive like a bat out of hades, so to speak. Brooke told me about how she hated this ritual. I told her to speak out about it. It wasn't fair to her, her driving record, not to mention the others on the road.

What would you do?
I would speak up about it.
Speeding and unsafe Driving were never in my Job Description.
 

jvin248

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Let the girl vent, but she needs to obey traffic safety.

Some managers get completely off center of their importance in the world.
Some feel they need to create chaos in others to feel self-important.
Great managers are really good with their people and won't create that situation.




Perhaps her boss is one of these folks?




.
 
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ChicknPickn

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Some managers get completely off center of their importance in the world.
Some feel they need to create chaos in others to feel self-important.
Great managers are really good with their people and won't create that situation.

.
Kinda funny in that I replaced "managers" with "employees" and it still worked great.
 




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