How To Yellow A Pickguard Edge To Match Binding?

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by scottser, Aug 16, 2019.

  1. scottser

    scottser Tele-Afflicted

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    so i have a lovely washburn HB15, the pickguard of which the previous owner 'customised'. lets just say he won't have a career in pickguard customisation any time soon. anyway, i picked up a nice 3 ply tortoiseshell guard which has a white edge edge and looks out of place with the 'aged' look of the guitar's binding. what would you guys use to stain the guard edge? i was thinking a dark varnish
     
  2. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Shoe polish, or amber shellac are my go-to's.

    Wood stain might work as well, but I'd start light!
     
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  3. scottser

    scottser Tele-Afflicted

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    shoe polish eh?
    i'll give that a go. cheap solutions are always good :)
     
  4. E5RSY

    E5RSY Poster Extraordinaire

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    Regardless of what you choose to put on it, may want to lightly heat the edge with a hair dryer or heat gun before application, which may let it take the color easier and quicker.
     
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  5. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Holic

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    I had the same situation with my Gibson ES-275.

    The binding on the body and neck had a real pleasing sort of antique ivory color to it, but the edges of the pick guard were a stark-looking, and glaring white.

    The shoe polish idea sounds real good, but in my case, I don't have any shoe polish because I don't have any shoes that require shining :).

    So, I worked with what I had and mixed up a little batch of Trans-Tint dye, using honey amber and a bit of medium brown. After first testing the color, I wiped down the pick guard's edges with that mix. It took the harshness out of the bright white and gave it nice subtle aged ivory appearance.

    I'm not sure what type of plastic Gibson uses for pick guards, but the white is pretty resistant to dyes. I thought I'd need to dilute the strength of the dye mixture way down, but I ended up applying it at pretty close to full strength. I've learned the hard way to always test on something that won't hurt if it gets messed up ;).







    Best Regards,
    Geo.
     
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