How to soundproof house from garage noise?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by jonyorker, Oct 1, 2019.

  1. jonyorker

    jonyorker Tele-Meister

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    Hey Folks,

    My wife asked me if there was a way we could greatly diminish if not remove noise from the attached garage getting into the house.

    The garage doesn't share a door, but was an add-on to the house afterwards, which means I've got the brick siding for a portion of the wall in common, as well as some roof/roof connection

    I was wondering if covering the wall with the foam pyramids like this https://www.amazon.ca/Arrowzoom-Soundproofing-Pyramid-Acoustic-Absorbing/dp/B01M0S17HR/ would accomplish anything?

    Noise creators in garage would be power tools, like table saws, routers, planers and a dust collector

    Thanks!
     
  2. Dismalhead

    Dismalhead Poster Extraordinaire

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    About 20 years ago I built a studio in my garage. I used R10 foam board, then a layer of R30 pink roll insulation on top of that, and then 3/4" fire resistant drywall to cover it, and big squares of shag carpet to cover most of the walls. I could play at stage level volumes including an acoustic drum set (I'd guess 95+ dB) and you could barely hear it outside.
     
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  3. scottser

    scottser Friend of Leo's

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    that would be pretty expensive for not much noticeable difference. i'd line the brick wall with 4 inches of rockwool insulation behind a dry wall, then cover it in carpet off cuts to keep the high end reflections down.
     
  4. WireLine

    WireLine Tele-Afflicted

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    How much isolation do you want? As Dismalhead stated you can reduce SPL, but it can be fairly expensive. The hard core way would also to physically disconnect common surfaces like floor, doors, roof, etc...
     
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  5. don71

    don71 Tele-Afflicted

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    I would rather buy sheets of 4X8 foam at your local home supply store. Easy to cut with a utility knife or hand saw. You can glue,screw,nail and paint it.

    Like whats mentioned in post #2
     
  6. unixfish

    unixfish Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Table saws and planers and the like will produce dust / sawdust (duh). I think all the dust will just collect in those foam panels and make a mess.

    The shared walls probably need some 2x4 covering with spray / foam deadener and thick drywall for sound deadening.

    I have not done this - so my opinion means very little - but I do think acoustic foam squares or carpet squares in a wood shop is just asking for a dust mess problem down the road.
     
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  7. knockeduptele

    knockeduptele Tele-Holic

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    If its a brick dividing wall PVA seal and paint as the mortar is porous and lets everything go through. Rockwool and foam will absorb a bit of stuff - That deals with airborne noise to a degree, but if the house and garage are on a common or joined slab you are still stuck with transmission through the structure- impact noise from tools through the slab is tough to get rid of short of getting a guy in with a big saw to put a gap in the slab (and foundations!)
     
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  8. RollingBender

    RollingBender Tele-Afflicted

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    Hand tools?
     
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  9. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    As several have said, the gold standard for reducing sound transmission is de-coupling. Insulation helps some but to have significant reductions in sound transmission you need two things. Decoupling of structural connections and mass. If you google the topic there are engineered solutions which allow you to de-couple your drywall from your framing which are really effective. Pretty much all options to de couple structural connections are EXPENSIVE, especially after the fact. Also, there are specifically designed fabric and solid sheet materials which are really dense that can be hung, creating an air gap between themselves and walls which are also really effective.

    Here is a link to a decent explanation. https://www.explainthatstuff.com/soundproofing.html
     
  10. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Offset wall by an inch from the common wall so no noise conduction path.
    Layer of 5/8ths drywall, tape the seams (doesn't need to be mudded fancy)
    "Green" isolation caulk -- big tubes of it at the hardware store in the insulation area, for sound proofing. Put on like construction adhesive for the next layer.
    Second layer of 5/8ths drywall over the isolation caulk, tape and mud the seams (make as pretty as you like)

    Ensure no airgaps under/over/around the wall.

    Low cost method is tightly stack books floor to ceiling with random spines to break up sounds and give a mass wall.
    Scrounge all the romance novels from libraries and used book shops getting rid of them for free -- that way you have uniform 'bricks' to stack with so no air spaces.

    Then build several noise traps: Shredded blue-jeans insulation in 1x4 (4inch deep) picture frames with burlap over the top to hold the insulation in and let noise get trapped inside. These work better than the cone foam sold for big bucks. Hang these on the common wall and reflecting walls.

    .
     
  11. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    In addition to the useful suggestions already posted I'd suggest dissecting the kind of noise and the times you will make it before attempting a large scale soundproofing project because your wife asked you if there was a way.

    IME table saw and dust collector are not all that loud or unpleasant to hear in one building coming from another building.
    Planer and router are very unpleasant though, and perhaps a strategy could ask how many hours a week you run the planer and router.
    Might still want to turn on the dust collector and run into the house to ask your wife if that machine bothers her.
    If she can't hear the dust collector then do the same with the table saw and a friend making some cuts.
    I'd bet that is also not a tool that bothers anyone in another building, even if on a coupled slab.

    OTOH a musician who marries someone who needs dead silence at all times should have their head examined!
    Sorry, I've been managing neighbor, roommate and mate noise complaints for 40 years and find diplomacy is the first line of reasoning.
    Meaning that giving the sensitive eared person some control of what sounds at what times for how long: can often eliminate the problem entirely.
    If more is needed then I work on the truly offending sounds and try to absorb as much as possible at the source, as opposed to soundproofing an entire building. If your garage is bare studs though (and you are maybe retired but planning a small business where you run the planer and/ or router for hours every week), maybe a full soundproofing job with a second decoupled interior 2x3 stud wall is worth investing in.

    For my dollar the really loud thing might be less expensively isolated into a smaller dust room with your insulation solutions, but I'm not sure what you run through the planer. Long boards require a bigger room. Guitar lumber might allow a 6'x8' double wall room for the planer on wheels, plus a bench for routing. These more prolonged dust producers would also be good to isolate for the dust management in the shop. At least I'd rationalize it that way.
    I actually divided my 24x28 garage in half to keep the dust in one side.

    Still, it seems odd to do a large scale soundproofing job on a home hobby garage if not for band rehearsals that go on for six hours every weekend. Partly because neighbors are more inclined to make noise complaints about the devils music than about the woodworker.
    Will you be running the planer for six hours every weekend?
    That's a lot of lumber!

    If planer and router can be scheduled around your wife being out of the house, that would net you a pile of cash.
    For that matter the money saved could pay for your wife to go to the spa for a couple of hours when you have some planing or routing to do.
    Diplomacy is great stuff! But when there is no diplomatic solution possible, other measure are next...
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2019
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  12. knockeduptele

    knockeduptele Tele-Holic

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    An anecdote on structural borne noise which I heard from the late Ken Shearer, the acoustician who put the Flying Saucers in the Albert Hall

    There was a bungalow next door to a recording studio and the residents were complaining about the noise from the Studio at night keeping them awake. So they went in armed with meters and recorders etc put didn't pick up anything. So Ken being Ken, used to dealing with London studios over underground lines (mind the doors was another of his stories), lay down with his ear to the floor and heard everything from the studio.

    Turned out that there was a concrete path joining the two properties and the transmission from the studio went down the path through the foundations of the bungalow (single story so bedroom downstairs on the slab), and up the legs of the bed into the mattress

    Simple solution in the end - a saw cut through the path.

    illustrates the difference between air borne and structural borne transmission
     
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  13. Danjabellza

    Danjabellza Friend of Leo's

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    The foam mounted to the walls really only cuts down on reflections and echo in the room, in my experience. Doesn’t do much for keeping sound from the adjoining rooms. I watched a video on soundproof walls and it includes extra thick plywood, special insulation and a couple other things. I’ll try to find it and link it in.
     
  14. puddin

    puddin Tele-Holic

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    So many ways to cut down echoes, and reflections. I wonder if these industrial blankets would help. Also, I would consider getting a little creative, on the cheap, ways of isolating all the electric noise makers.Only way to soundproof, is to build a room, within a room. good luck to you.


    https://acousticalsolutions.com/soundproofing-industrial-noise/
     
  15. Shuster

    Shuster Poster Extraordinaire

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  16. randomhitz

    randomhitz Tele-Meister

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    Get a buddy to run the tools while you listen inside. Put your ear against the wall, the floor and the ceiling in the room that adjoins the garage. You might be able to make a cheap listening device by getting a cheap stethoscope somewhere like the ones they make for listening to engines and tape a small funnel on the end instead of the metal rod. hold the funnel against the wall, floor or ceiling and see what you get. That will tell you where to focus your money.
     
  17. randomhitz

    randomhitz Tele-Meister

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    The good news is that power tools tend to put out higher frequencies, which are easier to block. It's possible that you might have some rumble from your dust collector which could be mitigated by putting it isolator pads. If the main problem turns out to be the wall you can attach furring strips to the brick wall and then attach something called resilient channel to the furring strips to decouple. Resilient channel is used in motels and condos to help minimized transmission. It's cheap.
    when you have the RC installed you then attach a layer of drywall, a layer of soundboard, and then another layer of drywall. Caulk the seams of the drywall as mentioned above. Also stagger the seams of each layer. There will be room to add an inch and a half of insulation between the "studs" that you create with the furring strips and resilient channel.
     
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