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How to Proceed with a paper wrap?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Rigel7, Feb 28, 2021.

  1. Rigel7

    Rigel7 Tele-Meister

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    Hi guys, gals, theys,
    A while back I started a paper wrapped (tacky wrapping paper as it happens) topped Tele. Started it in earnest, and then set it aside once I got the paper glued down. I'd like to resume, but I'm not sure where to begin. Basically, and I know this is a dumb question, but how do I start the process of building a finish on it with out soaking and ruining the paper? Has anyone ventured down this road yet?
     
  2. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Doctor of Teleocity

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    How did you glue the paper down without to glue soaking through or it bubbling up once dry?
    I tried this with several different adhesives and never got any successful result.
     
  3. Rigel7

    Rigel7 Tele-Meister

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    Excellent question, I tried a few things but I found "painting" on a layer of clear Gorilla Glue worked best. Did in small strips, like "painting" a strip of glue an inch or two wide across the guitar, and then sort of easing the paper on to it and smoothing it out as I went.

    I guess to try and clarify what I'm thinking:
    I'd like to use lacquer because in general I have better luck with lacquers than other products, but also lacquer tends to be rather thin, and I'm worried if it's "too thin" it won't really protect or encase the paper well. Keep in mind, my only real experience with wrap finishes has been the Japanese made florals and I think they're just buried under poly. I'm not sure if that's true of the original ones or the idea in general.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2021
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  4. mkgearhead

    mkgearhead Tele-Meister

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    I did this one with a poster. I glued it down and let it dry. I did very thin clear coats so the colors wouldn't bleed. After it was completely sealed in clear I applied thicker coats to protect it.

    thumbnail_IMG_4464.jpg thumbnail_IMG_4465.jpg
     
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  5. Rigel7

    Rigel7 Tele-Meister

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    @mkgearhead So start thin and build? What product did you use?
    That looks really cool, btw!
     
  6. peteycaster

    peteycaster Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Just a thought but maybe google decoupage. Sounds like a similar process. You would just have to work out what finish to use over it but I suppose that was your question to start with. Maybe Duplicolor clear coat? Sorry I can't be of more help.
     
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  7. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    I would try clear shellac, like Zinsser bulls-eye. Safest method is to try out things on test scraps before trying it on your project. Shellac adheres well to almost anything you put on top of it, lacquer, poly, etc.
     
  8. mkgearhead

    mkgearhead Tele-Meister

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    I think it was just Rustoleum if I remember right. Start with really light coats. If you go too heavy at first the colors of the paper might bleed. If you have some paper left over you could glue it to a piece of scrap wood as a test piece before you start on the body.

    249117_1.jpg
     
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  9. Rigel7

    Rigel7 Tele-Meister

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    Like a brush on shellac?
     
  10. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Brush on will work, but it's more difficult to lay down smooth, even layers. Zinsser comes in rattle cans. Shellac is nice because it dries quickly and is easy to sand, you can do 10 coats in a morning. People usually apply poly or lacquer over it, because shellac is soluble with alcohol, and even after 10 years of drying, a drop of whiskey can ruin a shellac finish. Other than that, it's quite durable.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2021
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  11. Luvs2yoko

    Luvs2yoko TDPRI Member

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    I used clear PVA glue and a roller, elmers I think. Finished with watch watco clear lacquer. image.jpeg
     
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  12. Rigel7

    Rigel7 Tele-Meister

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    Hooooooooooah man, that looks great!
     
  13. Rigel7

    Rigel7 Tele-Meister

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    I'm far from a glue expert, is this a PVA?
     

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  14. tvvoodoo

    tvvoodoo Tele-Afflicted

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    The way i did it with gift wrap paper one time was take my paper and put it in an empty picture frame. then, I mist coated it several times, and a couple good coats on each side to waterproof it, then glued it down.

    I surmise if you are careful with several mist coats prior to more serious coats you should be ok, but spray dry to start.
     
  15. stratisfied

    stratisfied Tele-Holic

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    I don't think you want to use anything that brushes on. The brushing action can abrade the paper that is wetted by by the coating as you brush it. I would just use spray can lacquer but clear acrylic enamel spray would work too. With lacquer you can start with multiple light dusting coats letting it dry between coats. Do not apply a flood (finish) coat until you have built up a lacquer base. With enamel you have to spray a wet coat from the start which could affect the paper. Best to try a sample.

    I did a project a long time ago and used 3M Photomount spray adhesive to adhere the paper. It sprays a light coat that is almost dry to the touch. If you coat one side, you get a temporary bond, spray both mating surfaces and you get a permanent bond like contact adhesive but it is formulated to not penetrate the paper too deeply so as to cause over-wetting. I top coated with Deft spray lacquer as above.
     
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