How to play like this? I don't know, can it be taught?

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by ASATKat, Mar 26, 2019.

  1. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Try and play as many notes outside the box as you can as fast as you can.
    Having a few drinks to loosen up first would also help.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2019
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  2. MickM

    MickM Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    I can't seem to find the "one".
     
  3. stantheman

    stantheman Doctor of Teleocity

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    ...and so the question becomes who did Keith Jarret listen to, to get the those chops? He may have written the song but I stand by what I said -I hear a lot of the albums "A Love Supreme" and "Bitches Brew" in the runs that Mr. Julian Lage is playing.
    Perhaps You do not.
    I do.
     
  4. rangercaster

    rangercaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    My good friend once approached a rather famous guitarist after a show and asked him how he did what he did ... The guitarist smiled and answered... "Practice" ... A great lesson for us all ...
     
  5. darkwaters

    darkwaters Friend of Leo's

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    Legend has it that a musician once sat in a club, listening to John Coltrane, with blank music sheets, and wrote out one of his solos as it was performed. He later presented the sheet music to Coltrane as a gift and asked him if he could perform the solo again for him. Coltrane looked at the sheet music, laughed, and said that it wasn't possible.

    Rather than simply learning the solo note for note, which, in itself would be no mean feat, I believe you'd get more out of it by learning the chord changes and, once you have them under your belt, analyzing the note choices/arpeggios/scales that Lage is playing over them. Me, I'd have to do it with pen and paper. Once done, make a backing track of the song, chords only, and start applying what you've learned. You can steal some of his phrasing and ideas, but really try to make the tune your own. IMO you'd get a whole lot more out of it. Good luck !
     
  6. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Which Jarrett tune?
     
  7. Buzzgrowl

    Buzzgrowl Tele-Meister

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    Early on there is a quote from Metheny's American Garage. Very influenced by Frissel and Abercrombie.
     
  8. gitold

    gitold Poster Extraordinaire

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    First of all you have to listen to Jazz. All the great players, guitars and horn players. Then practice major and minor scales for hours on end in all 5 positions on the fretboard. Learn about modes and how they interact with chords. Whole tone scales and diminished scales All the while learn to play rhythm to 20 classic jazz standards. Learn the melodies of the songs. After that find your own voice and play. The hardest part is finding people who will play with you while your learning but with all the great jazz tracks out there on the net at least you’ll have something to play along with. Oh yeah, and if you don’t like bebop just keep playing that rock and roll.
     
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  9. 392Hemi

    392Hemi Tele-Meister

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    I wish I could noodle like that.

    I was thinking Bill Frisell on this one.

     
  10. LazyBear

    LazyBear TDPRI Member

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    Yep, I think that's it. Knowing some of the "jazz" scales will help a lot.
     
  11. ASATKat

    ASATKat Friend of Leo's

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    So sorry, It's not KJ, it's Ornette Coleman and the tune is Tomorrow Is The Question.
     
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  12. cousinpaul

    cousinpaul Friend of Leo's

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    In Front?
     
  13. ASATKat

    ASATKat Friend of Leo's

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    My bad, it's Ornette Coleman. The tune is called Tomorrow Is The Question.
     
  14. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Really liked that! Being a guitar/bass/drums trio gives a lot of space for each instrument. It doesn't sound crowded to me, plus this is live, not a studio recording, so I like it when players stretch out and go for it.
     
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  15. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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  16. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Start at 1:02 and learn the next thirty seconds, but don't transcribe it.
    Just listen and play. Listen and play.
    By the time you've learned to play "it" you will have learned to play many of the other "it's", and can then listen for ideas you didn't think of because you're you not Julian.

    IMO if you learn the exact notes but not how to come up with the stream of ideas, you limit yourself, where learning it more from ear and playing it a multitude of "wrong" ways will build his lexicon into your lexicon.

    Maybe I'm just defective but IMO transcribing 5:20 on would be an exercise in going backward.
    But backward can be cool too.

    I suspect a lot of what he does he learned by moving his hands and listening to the sounds, then refining the results, eliminating the bad and repeating the better, until the live became the good.

    That's my best shot at "can it be taught"!
     
  17. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Looking at Brecker doing Coltrane or Murray doing Ayler, we find that they virtually must be themselves, even if playing some transcribed bits in the deal.

    I've been down this road with sax players more than with guitar players, because pre 1990 guitar was not as interesting to me as where the woodwinds had already mapped out.
    No offense to guitar players but for this sort of thing I'd prefer to absorb what they absorbed in order to form themselves into what you now want to absorb.

    I couldn't match Coltrane or Eric Dolphy etc as a multi instrumentalist sax player, but I gave it a shot and made some listeners happy for a minute.
    Had a lotta fun learning Albert Ayler tunes and saw David Murray several times.

    For whatever reason, when trying to think fluid saxy phrasing I have boxy piano phrases running concurrently in my head.
    I guess that goes with others suggesting "learn the chord changes".

    While I cannot ape any of those woodwind players on guitar, somewhere in between I find myself.


     
  18. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

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    He starts about 1:20 fyi

    .
     
  19. L.A. Mike

    L.A. Mike Tele-Afflicted

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    All roads lead back to Charlie Christian. Start with him.

     
  20. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

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    I've been following him for a couple years now.....love his sound on the Tele. I saw him live not long ago. I think he's fantastic....he's kind of the standard bearer for jazz guitar at the moment it seems to me.

    Personally, I hear a lot of Jim Hall influence in his playing....not sure why but I'm reminded of JH quite often....which is a beautiful thing!!...even if I'm not accurate in my perception.

    Also, this is his band..... he's been playing with them for a while now and that allows this sort of highly improvised stuff to happen a lot more successfully and musically because of the many hours put in with the same guys.....and guys who possess very high musical skills to begin with.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2019
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