How to make a clear coat dull without scratches?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Mark Adkins, Dec 11, 2013.

  1. Mark Adkins

    Mark Adkins Tele-Meister

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    I apologize if this has been asked before, but web searches have not yielded any answers.

    How do I make a clear coat dull without visible scratch marks?
     
  2. allen082

    allen082 Friend of Leo's

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    0000 steel wool. They make a synthetic kind that I like.
     
  3. mcknigs

    mcknigs Tele-Meister

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    I've heard of people using plastic Scotch Brite pot scrubbers for this. I seem to recall seeing a post (probably here) by a guy who stuck one to the face of a random orbital sander I think you'll get visible scratch marks in the beginning, but once you have a hundred marks or so on top of each other, it looked like a decent de-glossed finish job.

    Edit: here's a post on how to do it on your neck. I think it works pretty much the same with a body:

    http://www.tdpri.com/forum/diy-tool-shed/395638-how-turn-gloss-neck-matte.html
     
  4. SixShooter

    SixShooter Friend of Leo's

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    Go to a woodworking store and get a gray Scotchbrite pad. They are finer than the green ones. They also have white which is finer than the gray, but I like gray best. I have done this on a poly neck. Getting ready to do it on a poly body. Let us know how yours turns out & post pics!
     
  5. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I do a green scotchbrite pad to do the rough work and then follow with the white scotchbrite pad. ACE sells them one sheet at a time. I do it to necks as well. Take a little off with green, buff out the scratches with the white. If you want more clear off, just repeat. WARNING: The green takes it off in seconds, so be light with it!

    No metal strands to worry about too!
     
  6. Mark Adkins

    Mark Adkins Tele-Meister

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    Thanks all! I never thought of scotch bright pads before. The reason this came up is because I was burying a decal with satin lacquer, but it appeared glossy even after it was dry to the touch. After a couple of days of curing, the gloss went away and the satin appearance I wanted came through. No need to dull it, but still glad I asked in case I need to do so in the future. Here is a pic of the build, minus strings that I need to go and get for it.


    image-2690346657.jpg
     
  7. SixShooter

    SixShooter Friend of Leo's

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    Nice guitar.

    This process also works for making a poly neck less sticky.
     
  8. ezas

    ezas TDPRI Member

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    I think I saw the same post (It was a Les Paul) and I loved the way it came out. Not sure where I saw it either but I remember the use of the orbital.
     
  9. mcknigs

    mcknigs Tele-Meister

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    Cool guitar. Lots of controls. Looks like it could use an altimeter in there somewhere. ;)
     
  10. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I hope you get through the pre-flight checklist before the song is over.

    Seriously, though, satin finishes can be accomplished in a number of ways. First the material can be mixed to include a hazy powdery substance called "flattener" which disperses light and gives the softened effect without harsh reflections, and it's going to be the difference between gloss, semi, and satin formulas. Everything else can be done after the finish is dry.

    You could rub it out with an abrasive pad as discussed above (please don't waste SWMBO's kitchen potscrubber, instead get the finer grit made for woodworking). Rubbing out, however, can be difficult with large areas (just ask a piano store about making a gloss ebony piano into satin and listen to all the excuses - it's true it'll look like something that's had scratches added to it).

    An alternative would be any number of rubbing compounds or abrasives that range from automotive compound (the old stuff, very coarse indeed), woodworking compounds like Menzerna (paste in a tub, not the finer blocks for charging buffing wheels), and powders like pumice and rottenstone.

    Once I was asked to refinish just the top of a small table with water damage from a potted plant. The top looked great, but all of a sudden it made the rest of the piece look like crap. So the options were to refinish the entire piece (not) or to rub out the repaired area to give it some age and patina. All the person wanted was to make it like it was before the plant leaked. Gets me thinking that it would be a useful technique for spot repairs on a vintage guitar (hiding the seam on a wood patch isn't difficult, but blending the new finish, well that's harder to obtain). Of course I wasn't able to parlay it into a career move like Tom Murphy...
     
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