how to handle that 'harsh' sound from tilted/elevated amp live

Discussion in 'Band Wagon' started by loggerboots, Nov 29, 2014.

  1. Newbie Brad

    Newbie Brad Tele-Meister

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    Stupid suggestion time but I do this sometimes:
    If you just can't seem to get the trebles down to what you would like, even by changing the amp's tone controls, then get used to rolling off trebles with your guitar tone control and make that your default way to roll with that amp. It might or might not seem acceptable. But at least then you can roll trebles on and off with your guitar knob if you want to add treble stab or trebly cluckiness for a few phrases.
     
  2. loggerboots

    loggerboots Tele-Meister

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    Thanks Sax!

    Yes, this is a great amp, I think I was a little unclear. I don't think there is anything wrong with it, but my question was more should I EQ it on stage so it sounds good to me pointing at my head vs flat on the floor, which is how I had been running it.

    I had previously used it exclusively flat on the floor, and really gotten used to it that way, and since I've been tilting it back, I have to reassess how I have it dialed in. I wasn't sure if I should leave it really bright and cutting playing live or tamp it down so it sounded good whilst pointing at my ears vs my calves (the whole 'cut through the mix' conundrum - e.g. what sounds good to me, at home and/or at low volume may not work well in a band mix and vice versa).

    FWIW, if one of these are your GAS amps, keep an eye on the used market. I picked this up for about 1/2 retail. If you get a used one, you can send the chassis to 65 and they'll go through it, undo any mods, fix anything that's out of spec, and transfer the lifetime warranty to your name. The service isn't cheap, but a good option imo, and a smart way to buy one of these if you don't want to play full retail for a new one. I haven't bothered to send mine in yet because I seems to be working properly. BTW, I went through a lot of amps last year as I moved from playing at home to playing out and this is the one I ended up with for various reasons. I like it's simplicity and it's about the perfect power level for playing with a rock drummer if you like natural overdrive (just don't ask it to stay clean at band volume!).
     
  3. 1955

    1955 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Turn down the treble, etc., also get a long cord, walk out in the venue, adjust until it sounds alright.

    You adjust not only how the audience hears you, but how they hear you wherever, and how you hear you, the band hears you, etc.
     
  4. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Even a super-expensive hand-built amp is going to have some beaminess; it's the nature of speakers. You can adjust your tone to fit the sound right in the beam, or to fit the sound off-axis--or use a beam blocker to mitigate the effect.

    It's not a flaw in an amp's design any more than tube-overdrive distortion is, but you do have to think about it. Some guys, if their amp is being mic'ed, will actually point the amp AWAY from themselves and other people, and get their sound from the PA.
     
  5. loggerboots

    loggerboots Tele-Meister

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    Thanks for the advice, we rehearsed tonight and I did as advised, I eq'd things a little darker then normal, and I actually set the amp further away. We rehearsed in a different room and there wasn't room for my stuff back by the drums and bass, so I set up across the room, amp on it's tilt back stand, facing towards me. It was actually a little lower than me as the room had a stage that I was standing on, but it sounded about the same in front of the stage, too. I moved around the beam to see how the sound changed, and that was educational, and found a sweet spot to stand. I ended up actually brightening up the setup as the night went on, I overcompensated at first.

    Darkening up the tele really helped, but I think I'm just adjusting to it as well.

    I used my Les Paul for the first time with this amp ( I never play my les Paul, but I was thinking the darker guitar would be a nice thing to try), and omg - wow, it sounded great for the rock stuff. It actually would drive the amp too hard for the softer stuff, so I ended up using my tele for the lighter stuff and the Les Paul for the heavier stuff that could use a lot of overdrive. It sounded really, really good. I'm going to bring both guitars to our next show.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2014
  6. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

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    My point is ANY amp is like that, because speakers are like that: lots more high end when they're pointed right at your head. High frequencies tend to be quite directional, whereas lower frequencies have a wider dispersion. It doesn't matter how much you spend on the amp.

    I have a cab with the exact same speaker in it, and it does the same thing, of course. I made my own beam blocker out of a 4" dia circle of black foam rubber. It does help.
     
  7. Mindthebull

    Mindthebull TDPRI Member

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  8. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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  9. loggerboots

    loggerboots Tele-Meister

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    Guess what, amp died on me tonight… Well, didn't quite die, but appeared to be on it's way out. Volume started cutting out again when pushed, this time more frequently, and this time I could smell a faint burning smell… Not sure it's related to any harsh frequencies, probably just a coincidence, but there you have it.
     
  10. JoeNeri

    JoeNeri Friend of Leo's

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    If you don't like the sound of what's coming out of your amp, why would you expect the audience to like it?

    One of the benefits of either elevating or tilting your amp is not only that you can hear what your amp sounds like, but you can also hear the amount of volume better. When an amp is pointed at your knees, you'll have a tendency to increase your volume so you can hear it better, but as you turn up, so does everyone in your band, forcing you to turn up more, etc., etc.

    I'm assuming you are playing several feet (if not yards) in front of your amp, so if your tone is harsh at that distance, EQing your guitar, pedals and amp is the solution - shouldn't need a beam blocker, grill cloth tape, etc. in most cases. If you can't EQ it to sound better, consider getting a different amp.
     
  11. 66teleman

    66teleman TDPRI Member

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    I hate the sound of a speaker pointed right at my head. I like to get my amp in the "backline", and angle it slightly into the band. That way the sound is being diffused thru various stuff on the stage and is unlikely pointed right into someones face. Then I am hearing like everyone else is.
     
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