How to get side of body flat?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by sleazy pot pie, Feb 28, 2020.

  1. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I bought an lp jr shaped body made from reclaimed wood off of eBay.
    The sides are very roughly cut and I could like to even it out.
    Since I do not have the template it was made from, how do I get the sides even?

    I know I can spend a ton of time sanding the sides flat, but there is no guarantee I keep that level.

    I have a router as well as a router table.

    I can post some pics tonight to show what I mean.
    could use some guidance
     
  2. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire

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    Edge sander would be the best way without a template. If you don't have one available, maybe set up a rig with a belt sander.
     
  3. koolaide

    koolaide Tele-Holic

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    Suggest that you post the pics. If it is reclaimed wood strips maybe a lot of endgrain and prone to tearout. This would make using a router table more difficult. Initial thought would be sandpaper on a flat block. or maybe a flapper disc on a drill or grinder. Kinda depends on your skills.
     
  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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  5. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Oscillating spindle sander is a good tool to have...the table provides a reference point that keeps the edges perpendicular to the table. (assuming the back and/or front of the body is flat at that point) The Ridgid (and I think Triton, too) has an advantage in that it can have a spindle and belt setup interchangeably. Always use the largest diameter spindle you can for a given area, and switch to smaller diameter spindles as needed to get into tighter spaces. Hold onto the workpiece carefully, too...it can grab and make for an unpleasant result. Be sure you use dust extraction, too...
     
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  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    A spindle sander works best on the inside curves and can leave outside curves lumpy. The outside curves really need a platen to hold the wood against. Before spindle sanders were available at home centers, myself and bunch of woodworkers used to use a regular stationary Craftsman 6 x 48" belt sander upright (with its table in place to support the work)for outside curves. There were also large disc sanders to accomplish the same kind of thing. You get cross grain scratches but those can be sanded out with progressively finer grits. Don't discount a regular belt sander or even a disk sander if you have access to one. Even a 4 x 36" belt sander can do it.


    https://www.shoppok.com/indianapoli...lt-Sander---Vintage----220--Indianapolis-.htm
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2020
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  7. Peegoo

    Peegoo Tele-Afflicted

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    Without power tools, the best way to address this is to have the sandpaper stationary and move the body over it.

    For large outside curves, use double-stik tape to attach 80-grit paper to the side of a wooden block that you clamp to your work bench. Slide the body flat atop the bench against the sanding block. For inside curves, cut 2" lengths of appropriate-diameter sched 40 PVC pipe, tape sandpaper to that, and clamp it vertically to your bench top. Slid the body flat on the bench against the tube. If you slice the PVC pipe with a chop saw ("miter saw") the cuts will be perfectly 90 degrees through the tube.

    Work upward from 80 grit to 120 to 220. If you start with 220 you'll be at it for a while.
     
  8. Deeve

    Deeve Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    do more side crunches to flatten those sides ;)

    sent from the gym
     
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  9. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    An oscillating spindle sander is probably the easiest way to do this free hand but if you don't have one and have a router table I would make a template that is just a hair smaller than your body. Use 1/4 MDF and you can sand the shape by hand. Then stick the template on with double stick tape (I like a couple of screws into areas that will be removed like p/u cavities). Use a good sharp flush cut bit with a follower bearing to bring the sides down to the template. Watch your direction of cut to avoid tear out. Then do the round over or any binding with appropriate bits.

    Remember that the actual shape of the outside of the body doesn't matter that much - if you end up taking 1/16 or so off so what. It does matter at the neck pocket - be careful there.

    When I did my first LP I clamped a big block of wood on my little benchtop belt sander and used that as a fence. It was pretty awkward

    034.JPG

    035.JPG
     
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  10. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Lots of good ideas here. I will post up some pics this evening.
     
  11. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    upload_2020-2-28_11-21-31.jpeg

    Any reviews of this spindle sander?
    On local CL for $60
     
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  12. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Last edited: Feb 28, 2020
  13. richbike

    richbike Tele-Meister

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    Get down the gym
     
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  14. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    I finally after building 25 guitars without owning a spindle sander bought one similar to that Ryobi - I think I paid about $150 new. I've been using it on the double neck - it works fine and certainly speeds up some of the hand sanding operations. I'll put it away in the attic when I'm done.
     
  15. eallen

    eallen Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    It depends on what you mean by rough or uneven. At some point I block sand the sides to get rid of all waviness. Use rounded blocks in rounded areas.

    Eric
     
  16. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Grab that spindle sander!!! It will perform a multitude of tasks. For the first few years of building these guitar things I used to use it for everything including thickness sanding guitar sides down to 2.5 to 3.00mm thickness.

    Grab it!!!! Replacement sanding sleeves readily available!

    DC
     
  17. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Ok, so I got some cell phone pics of the body in question. A little background on my intentions may help.
    I bought this body off of eBay with the idea of making something my best buddy could hang on the wall in his bar. My idea is to make a piece of functional wall art. The biggest emphasis is going to be on looking cool, but I want a playable guitar as well.
    I like the patina on the top and back as well as the grain on the sides. I haven’t decided on a finish yet. I may try to leave the top and back as close to what you see as possible and hit the sides with vinegar and steel wool or I may do either a burst or solid trans color. I will post up some pics of my inspiration for both of those ideas.
     
  18. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    465AE542-C6DC-4CAA-9205-5B3459BE0CC4.jpeg
    I have had this thing boxed up for a while and it isn’t quite as rough as I remember it being. It appears I actually started sanding it a little.
    788F7732-5CFC-406E-9563-46D68433135E.jpeg As you can see there are some voids on the sides, which don’t bother me much.

    8CDC7757-BC46-4F69-913D-B030D9BC3BBA.jpeg
    I don’t know if you can tell, but the joints to the right of the control cavity aren’t quite even, but again, this doesn’t really bother me.
     

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  19. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    Frankly for what you describe I wouldn't sand it much at all. I would give it an organic finish that dries satin, TruOil might be a good choice. I don't think I would try to artificially add any funkyness with your vinegar stains - the wood has enough character itself. You might want to stabilize any of the really bad areas with some epoxt but I wouldn't do much more. Whatever you decide, practice on some scrap (which you probably don't have)_

    I personally don't like artificially relic'd guitars but certainly relic'd hardware suits this one.
     
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  20. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    This is an old Fano sp6 made out of 400 year old cedar. I have loved this guitar since the first time I saw a picture of it. I would love to get a chance to play it, maybe more than any other guitar I can think.
    1EB0DFBB-65BA-456E-A2E4-A4F4187EC462.jpeg EC349BB4-57EE-4CE2-976C-372A3C5C6387.jpeg 76DD401D-541B-4F65-8942-A3E409A54CBB.jpeg Here is a burst on a reclaimed chestnut guitar made for Phil X by Paoletti Guitars.
    There is just something raw about the fender 3 tone burst on a semi hollow dc lp jr shape that is appealing to me.
     
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