How to get rid of brown rusty spots on soldering iron tip

Discussion in 'Shock Brother's DIY Amps' started by itsGiusto, Nov 2, 2019.

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  1. Telegnosis

    Telegnosis Tele-Meister

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    You need this using it while you solder and specially after you get done before you turn the iron off. Leave it tinned.

    Amazon sells a lot of the different brands and kits.

    [​IMG]

    Use this brass wool ball and jab the tip in there several times often while soldering.

    Forget the wet sponge. The wool ball is all you'll need.

    You can also buy stainless steel balls you find to clean pots and pans to bolster the brass ball that comes with these ball holders. This way you don't have to dig in there with the iron tip if they don't give you enough wool.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2019
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  2. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I use a Velleman desoldering mesh. The mesh ball can be pulled out of the cup so that the old bits of solder can be dumped..and the mesh ball, rubbed around, cleaned, and reformed. I saw another brand that does the same thing. Just google Velleman desoldering mesh and you will get to that and other options. There is a similar one with a stand....they are on eBay...and elsewhere, I am sure. I have no affiliation with any company, but I would want to have a unit that allowed the mesh to be pulled out and cleaned.
     
  3. corliss1

    corliss1 Friend of Leo's Platinum Supporter

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    The brass wool/mesh/whatever you want to call it is superior to water in every possible way.

    Good iron, keeping it tinned, and using the mesh makes tips last far longer than any wet cleaning.

    By the time you get rusty spots, that tip needs to go, in my experience. With care, my tips seem to last until they get so heat stressed they eventually break in half.
     
  4. raito

    raito Poster Extraordinaire

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    I use the mesh while working. Before I stop, I use the sponge followed by retinning. That way my tip is always bright when I start again.
     
  5. jtcnj

    jtcnj Tele-Holic

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    +1 on the cheapy $30. solder station on Amazon; I have used mine the last few years through several builds now.
    Run through the brass mesh after every joint; tin before every joint and when shutting down.
    Tip stays clean.

    The key is to prevent that tip from starting to pit.
     
  6. PCollen

    PCollen Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I have a Ungar 777 handle with a 1237s 42 watt element That I
    I've used for 40 years and NEVER have cleaned. Just wipe it on the sponge after use before it cools. Of course, I rarely solder anything , but it's still functional.
     
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  7. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    How to get rid of brown rusty spots on soldering iron tip

    Best to use a dagger instead of the iron....
     
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  8. itsGiusto

    itsGiusto Tele-Meister

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    On the Amazon page, they say this is for plumbing work, not electrical soldering. I think someone previously mentioned in this thread that this plumbing paste is corrosive to electrical soldering irons?

    Thanks, I ordered some of this stuff, but I'm not sure how to use it! Could you help me out?

    It doesn't really look like a paste inside the can, but more like a hard tab. How does it work exactly? I can't even really rub my soldering iron on it, cause the angle of the can won't allow me to really rub it around on all sides.
     
  9. Art VanDelay

    Art VanDelay Tele-Afflicted

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    You're right that it is intended for joining copper pipes, but I've had no issues like corrosion or oxidation. I'm out of my depth here on knowledge so maybe somebody "in the know" can give you a conclusive answer.
     
  10. dan40

    dan40 Tele-Afflicted

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    You can get away with using acid core flux on the iron's tip because it won't stay on there for long before it wears away. You would not want to use it on electrical connections though because it will corrode the joint over time. I am a plumber by trade and we always wipe away the flux completely after soldering a copper joint. If not, the joint corrodes and turns green within a few days.
     
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  11. itsGiusto

    itsGiusto Tele-Meister

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    Is this stuff acid-core flux?
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001B0A3OQ/?tag=tdpri-20
     
  12. dan40

    dan40 Tele-Afflicted

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    It list in their technical specs that it should not be used on electrical connections so it likely is acid core. It is the same tinning flux that we use on large diameter copper pipe. It would still be okay to use on your tip though because you are constantly cleaning the tip during the soldering process.
     
  13. dan40

    dan40 Tele-Afflicted

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  14. Boreas

    Boreas TDPRI Member

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    "Thanks, I ordered some of this stuff, but I'm not sure how to use it! Could you help me out?

    It doesn't really look like a paste inside the can, but more like a hard tab. How does it work exactly? I can't even really rub my soldering iron on it, cause the angle of the can won't allow me to really rub it around on all sides."


    Is your can really shallow? Perhaps yours is in a different type of can. I assume you are using it with a HOT iron - correct? Mine is quite shallow and easy to use. The hot iron melts the hard material. I just tin the tip with it, not the entire iron end. I either plunge it or roll it around, then remove any excess with a brass wool ball noted above.
     
  15. Boreas

    Boreas TDPRI Member

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    Very good advice!!
     
  16. itsGiusto

    itsGiusto Tele-Meister

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    Thanks, I eventually figured it out. Though I still may not be using it right. After a session of using it, my tip looks kinda scuffed and dirty.

    For now, I'm using that acid core plumbing flux, since that really does always leave my tip looking like a mirror.
     
  17. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    That acid flux is not something I would use as it is likely to cause deterioration of the tip. One should use resin core solder and resin flux for our type of work.
     
  18. Boreas

    Boreas TDPRI Member

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    Mine looks like a mirror while still hot, but after it cools it dulls. No big deal - the tip will still be tinned the next time you light 'er up! A tip won't last forever - all we are doing here is to help with heat transfer and prolong the life of the tip a little. Best way to preserve a tip is to never use it!
     
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