How to fix small ***** in wood before staining?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Grupple, May 29, 2020.

  1. Grupple

    Grupple TDPRI Member

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    So, I was obviously not being careful enough and while drilling the holes for the neck mount ferrules I stabbed the body with the tip of the bit, leaving the tiniest little puncture in the wood.

    What's the best way to fill/fix this before applying the stain? It's very small. Just larger than a pin ***** and not too deep - but it's noticeable.

    I was just about the apply some vintage amber stain. Ugh.

    Tips? Advice?

    Thanks!

    IMG_3869.jpeg
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2020
  2. Bendyha

    Bendyha Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    It looks like no wood was removed, in which case you should be able to just swell it back with a drop of hot water....repeat as required.

    Sometimes I put a tiny soaked wad of tissue on the spot and a pinch of cling-foil over that to stop it drying to quickly, and leave it for a while.

    or.. a drop of water in the hole, and heat it with the tip of your not to hot soldering iron to boiling point...keep replacing the drop, don't touch the wood with the iron, and you will get no burn mark.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2020
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  3. Grupple

    Grupple TDPRI Member

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    Thanks! I'll give that a shot.

    (heh, just noticed it censored me typing p r i c k)

    If this doesn't fix it completely, what's the next thing? Maybe a tiny spot of grain filler or putty?
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2020
  4. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    On dark colored woods you can make a paste out of sawdust of the parent wood and either epoxy or medium CA. I use that trick whenever I do inlay - it fills the tiny voids and under finish is almost invisible. Unfortunately light colored wood just stands out when I try that, but I would do it anyway. You may be able to drop fill some of your amber in a bit of finish to cover it but its probably going to stand out. This would be a good place to experiment on some scrap.
     
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  5. Biffasmum

    Biffasmum Tele-Meister

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    Haha. It wouldn’t let me say ‘c o c k - o n’
     
  6. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    The water combined with some heat from an iron will hopefully bring that out for you since it appears to be just fibers split and compressed by the tip of the bit which doesn't appear to have been rotating.
     
  7. Grupple

    Grupple TDPRI Member

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    How would the iron be used. I assume not actually touching the wood. Would a heat gun also work?
     
  8. Si G X

    Si G X Tele-Afflicted

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    damp cloth, iron on top.... you could use a heat gun for sure, you just want to make steam with water and heat.
     
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  9. Si G X

    Si G X Tele-Afflicted

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    I did this just a few days ago, I used a damp cotton cloth and my soldering iron, I was skeptical but it worked a treat.
     
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  10. drumtime

    drumtime Tele-Holic

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    If the heat/water thing doesn't work, gather some very fine sawdust from the body wood, fill the "*****" with it, and add a drop of super glue. Sand after it dries. As noted above, this works better with darker wood, and is not perfect, but works very well. I learned it in a high-end woodworking shop.
     
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