How to fix fretboard divot?

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by davemontalvo, May 16, 2021.

  1. davemontalvo

    davemontalvo TDPRI Member

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    I’ve got Squire Strat with a Pau Ferro fretboard with a divot at the 6th fret just under the high E. Is there an easy way to fix this? I’m thinking wood filler, lightly sand it down and then color with a crayon?

    Or do I just leave it alone? It doesn’t affect playing at all. Just cosmetic.
     

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  2. RobRiggs

    RobRiggs Tele-Holic

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    That’s quite a chunk. I haven’t had good luck with filler on darker wood, rosewood, ebony, pau ferro. You could try some dark sawdust hardened with CA like you’d use to repair re-fret chips.
     
  3. hepular

    hepular Tele-Afflicted

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    i'd be inclined to get a tiny wood sample. exacto & file the edges of fingerboard; shape a replacement bit, & glue in & sand and shape.
     
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  4. dogmeat

    dogmeat Friend of Leo's

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    yeah... I would make a clean splice. it would be critical to find the right wood though. maybe contact some guitar builders for scrap chips. anyone do violin repair near you? that might be another source.

    here's Dan...

    Fixing fretboard chips on the Mike Bloomfield Tele | stewmac.com



    on the other hand, he has a thing about tinting epoxy. it wouldn't be a nice looking but a lot easier
     
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  5. Boreas

    Boreas Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Is that clean through to the maple?? Or is Pau Perro another word for plywood?

    Yeah - I would go the punch/plug route - if I were inclined to fix it. Find a small round punch and expand the divot - just like doing a position dot. Find some closely matching veneer and punch a plug. But if you want it to look good, have a pro do it.
     
  6. davemontalvo

    davemontalvo TDPRI Member

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    I like that sawdust + crazy glue solution. Might give that a try. I have an old rosewood fretboard on a busted acoustic I might be able to use to get some sawdust.
     
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  7. FenderGyrl

    FenderGyrl Poster Extraordinaire

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    Buy a cheap Rosewood Acoustic Bridge...sand it so that you have a pile o dust ....
    Build a tape dam along the edge...
    Fill the divot with the Magic Dust...
    Drop some Medium CA into it...
    A little dab will do ...
    Repeat ...
    File .... Sand ...
    Dont use Spray Activator...
    It'll make the repair shinier...

    Use less glue and more dust on each succeeding drop fill
    FG
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2021
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  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    If it is an expensive enough neck to warrant extra work, I'd inlay a little piece of wood in there. If it is a MIC neck, I'd pat some dark sawdust in there and drop fill some superglue. Then take an emery board or file and level it.
     
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  9. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    I fix divots in rosewood and ebony fretboards by powdering a little of the same wood and mixing with a bit of mediumo r thin CA. It might come out darker than the parent wood but it will be better than the hole. One word of warning, however, if you have used any kind of oil or other treatment on your f/b there is a very good chance the repair won't hold. Cleaning with acetone or naphtha might help.

    Ps - fill the divot with the dust, THEN drip the CA onto it. The CA will kick off as soon as it hits the dust and warning, its an exothermic reaction. You might have to do several applications, then sand back and clean up with steel wool.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2021
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  10. Boreas

    Boreas Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I would advise doing it in several layers. The larger amount of filler you use at once, the more likelihood of shrinkage and failure down the road.

    I would also try to do it by spreading the mixture around the sides of the crater with a toothpick and not just the bottom. This way, every layer also has less surface to shrink. Eventually, by building up the perimeter, the last application will just be a tiny drop in the center as opposed to a large area across the surface which will be more prone to chipping and wear.
     
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  11. Collin D Plonker

    Collin D Plonker Tele-Afflicted

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    I just repaired damage like that this week. I chiseled it square on the edges and angled on the bottom. I filed the bottom flat. Then I chiseled out a matching piece from scrap and glued it in with ca glue. A little glue and sawdust around the edges, sanded down, and boom. Invisible repair.
     
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  12. chucker

    chucker Tele-Meister

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    go into the lumberyard and they will have, like colored pencils, i forget the brand, in different wood shades, for filling. what you do is rub the crayon (?) back and forth fast, and it heats the wax compound, and fills up the hole. then afterwards the goop is on the fretboard as well as filling the hole, so you take a piece of cloth and rub it back and forth to clean it up. cost you a few bucks, non shrinking. old carpenter/cabinetmaker trick.
     
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