How often do you get buyer's remorse?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by sloppychops, Sep 29, 2021.

  1. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    29,838
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2012
    Location:
    Montana
    I research, A/B testing and can wait for a deal or sale and it has always paid off, so never remorse. My wife, the bass player on the other hand, falls in love instantly with a guitar or amp and buys on the spot … later to think otherwise.:oops: One lasted only hours and had to drive back two states and one time zone to return it the very next day.:mad::rolleyes:
     
  2. StrangerNY

    StrangerNY Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    5,400
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2010
    Location:
    Somewhere out on that horizon
    I'm with you on that one. I can think of 4 or 5 guitars I've had that I never should have given up.

    As far as buying - no regrets for the most part. I've been lucky enough to land quite a few keepers, and the ones that don't measure up get sent down the road.

    - D
     
    OldAndNew and nojazzhere like this.
  3. GAS Giant

    GAS Giant Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    415
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2021
    Location:
    Failed stars out past Mars
    I get buyer's remorse when sellers have been not disclosed issues with the guitar (plays great...except for the 15 popped frets, and so on...)

    Sometimes you find the right piece of gear at the wrong time and you have to make a choice between spending money allocated for other things or seeing the train leave the station. As more time passes, I have started getting much closer on understanding what I want (apparently this process takes 30 years and 200+ guitars in and out the doors)...When you find a piece that is right and unlikely to be duplicated (some esoteric amp or a really great, Excalibur-good, example of a guitar) you pull the trigger.

    And I am definitely aware of the vacations, savings, etc. that I have chosen against. I get a little bit of relief buying things that will hold their value or go up...a good deal of my gear is semi-liquid and can be converted for at least what I paid. My heart rate would go a lot faster if I had spent the money on something that vaporized before my eyes (poker chips in Vegas, fine dining, illicit substances)...I am unsentimental about my gear..part of the fun is trying different pieces out and seeing what music comes of it. Sometimes life circumstances make you streamline or, conversely, stockpile for a project/band. Some pieces are purchased exclusively to be flipped in a certain period of time. The profits from this pay for a lot of gear in turn, so no remorse.

    Paying cash or very limited use of cc helps. When I was young and dumb and living too close to a very well known purveyor of Gibson custom shop guitars, I absolutely lit my credit card on fire, buying lots of Gibsons. I would feel ill driving home with the guitar. I was playing in several bands with different applications, but none of it justified the storage rentals just to hold the gear (I was as bad with amps and recording gear as guitars)...I wasn't using a lot of it and didn't really know the guitars the way I know my main players now.

    Now, I can swoon over an online listing for a moment, but when I actually buy a guitar, the only reason that I open it the day it arrives is to make sure that I don't have a return issue. That is mostly a result of many repeated moments of realizing that it is just a guitar. It's fun, but my dreams do not hinge upon the acquisition of some rare bird, nor does my creative output, which is increasingly electronic based music. There was a substantial period of my life before instruments and there will be a substantial period, I hope, after...where I will be free to experience buyer's remorse for cars, stocks that tank, $35 a pound salmon that isn't as good as the cheap stuff...

    I have somewhere on the order of 25 guitars and 10 amps now, half of what I once had. (The fact that I divide time equally between bass and guitar has spread me pretty far). Some of that stuff is not valuable at all and has just hung around over the years, but it will eventually be down to just a few guitars and amps. My goals have shifted toward savings. I am listing a number of items for sale this week and will not be replacing them. The opportunity cost of all of this has still had immense dividends in fun.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2021
  4. sloppychops

    sloppychops Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,093
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2010
    Location:
    wisconsin
    For me, buyer's remorse is directly proportional to the amount paid for a guitar. The more it costs, the greater the remorse. Even if the guitar is wonderful, there's always a tinge of remorse. My Heritage H535, for instance. Fabulous guitar, completely paid for in one credit card statement, but one I still feel a tad remorseful and guilty for buying. Why? Because I could've bought something less expensive and been fine with it. I mean, it's not like I'm a pro musician making money playing guitar.
     
  5. Skub

    Skub Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,262
    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2010
    Location:
    N.Ireland
    I don't believe I've ever sold a guitar.

    In the past I've swapped/traded or given away gear,but mostly if I buy a guitar it stays bought.

    I've never had buyer's remorse. If I have the money to spare all is good,if I don't then I'll wait until I have.
     
  6. Tele-friend

    Tele-friend Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    675
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2020
    Location:
    EU
    I am usually over-analyzing everything, never bought a guitar on impulse. When I get gas, I usually wait till it goes away. So no buyers remorse for me yet.
    I am thinking on buying a Les Paul now for a couple of months... dont really need it, but probably should have at least one... :rolleyes:
     
    Fretting out and StrangerNY like this.
  7. sloppychops

    sloppychops Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,093
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2010
    Location:
    wisconsin
    "I would feel ill driving home with the guitar."

    I know that feeling.
     
    Fretting out and StrangerNY like this.
  8. E5RSY

    E5RSY Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    11,976
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2009
    Location:
    Georgetown, TX
    I am more solidly in the seller's remorse camp. The buying process for me is typically pretty extended and thus largely avoids buyer's remorse.
     
  9. CharlieO

    CharlieO Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    3,013
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2003
    Location:
    Sarasota, FL
    How long ago did you buy that H535? Can you sell it for a profit? I own 13 guitars, and the value of every one of them has at least kept up with inflation. Some have done far better than that. If you feel guilty about owning the Heritage, just sell it for whatever someone will pay and buy a decent $500 replacement. Even if you take a loss, at least you had the pleasure of owning it for a while.
     
  10. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    16,781
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2017
    Location:
    Foat Wuth, Texas
    With guitars, most of my regrets have been on ones I DIDN'T buy......so is that "passer's remorse"?
    I greatly regret selling a number of amps, although common sense and logic tell me I needed the money far more than the amps themselves. Probably the BIGGEST regret there was a 1967 silver-face Deluxe Reverb, bought as just a chassis. I had it fully restored, had a beautiful cabinet built, put a black-face control panel on, and an Eminence speaker installed. It sounded sweet, and looked brand new, so I often had to explain to questions that it WASN'T a reissue. (which had just started coming out then) But I had a dire point in finances, and I had to sell that, a '63 Deluxe, (no reverb) a '64 Princeton, and a '64 Bandmaster. Selling those hurt, but the money got me out of a hole. If I had kept the Deluxe Reverb, I wouldn't really miss the others. Oh well! ;)
     
  11. telemaster03

    telemaster03 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    59
    Posts:
    499
    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2008
    Location:
    Wichita, KS
    Once that I can think of, I bought a Telecaster that I didn't care for. It wasn't so much remorse, it just didn't work for me. I sold it and broke even.

    For me remorse would really only come from making a purchase I couldn't afford or displaced a more pressing financial need. I keep music purchases separate from household finances and they are more or less self-sustaining - if something comes then something goes. That, and gigging money supports my gear habit.
     
    StrangerNY and Ron C like this.
  12. buster poser

    buster poser Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,969
    Joined:
    May 1, 2018
    Location:
    Tewa Land NM
    I've bought three guitars in the last 18 months. Immediately pre-pandemic, we got my wife a Taylor GS Mini, and it's perfection for both of us at $500. Then I labored for months over the decision between a Vintera Jaguar or Gretsch 5420; pulled the trigger on the Jaguar and haven't been happy with it at all. Shortly after that, we got the wife a Mustang PJ Bass, she's barely touched it and again... I love it.

    I think the science is clear: Just buy guitars for your better half.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2021
    Tele-friend and StrangerNY like this.
  13. Ron C

    Ron C Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    842
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2006
    Location:
    Long Island, New York
    Someday I'd like to dive into books and studies on the psychology of retail buying. In general I find the science of why people do what they do pretty interesting, and buying beyond our basic needs sure is a big subset of that. There must be a bunch of triggers and brain chemicals at work with that desire->acquire->remorse cycle.

    Over the decades I've bounced many times between plain old curiosity that turns into purchases (e.g. "I wonder what a DuoJet into a Rat and a Princeton...") and the peace and calm I feel from keeping life really simple. So yes, there have been times when I felt some remorse, but it's so easy to sell or donate music gear that it's hardly a burden.

    In recent years I've learned to watch out for the hoarder's trap phrase: "this could be useful". Four words that could justify acquiring way more stuff than I'd ever want to see in my home.

    Out of scope: true music business gear
    My ramblings are separate from the stuff that I bought as a gigging musician that make load in/out faster and simpler, to play and sing better, to ensure that there are no interruptions at a gig due to an equipment malfunction. Stuff like a double gig bag, a simple IEM setup, well set up guitars etc. make an outsize impact on the enjoyment of gigging and the quality of the music delivered. And the right extra gear so that there's a business continuity plan for the show to go on no matter happens is just being a professional.
     
    buster poser and StrangerNY like this.
  14. Tele-beeb

    Tele-beeb Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,486
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2012
    Location:
    The Bluegrass
    Upon every rash purchase…
     
    StrangerNY likes this.
  15. Strebs

    Strebs Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    611
    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2015
    Location:
    NE Texas
    I used to get buyer's remorse a lot. Especially when I didn't have much disposable income. The guitars seldom lived up to the hype I'd built for them in my head.

    Now, I just figure that if I don't like a guitar after the honeymoon period is over, I'll move it on. Worst case, I may lose a few dollars. I've got a few guitars that I love so I'm not really looking for "the one" anymore and I don't expect any new guitar to be that special.

    I think it has to do with expectations that may be a bit too much. At least that was my case. For me, they become special when I play them a lot. In a way, having a bunch of guitars works against making them special. 1st world problems.
     
  16. gpilgrim

    gpilgrim TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    48
    Joined:
    May 19, 2020
    Location:
    Ithaca, NY
    I get buyers remorse pretty badly in general. My dislike of spending money is only partially balanced by the joy of having a new toy. Recently I built a partscaster (which I enjoyed doing) but it was a buyers remorse nightmare.

    1) Order parts - they are expensive, experience regret
    2) Wait for parts to arrive - shipping takes a long time, still lots of regret
    3) Parts arrive, but what I actually want is a guitar - building (while fun) takes a while, still feeling regrets
    4) Guitar finally built, is great - regret starts to subside

    I feel good now and really enjoy the guitar, but it was an unpleasant experience while it was happening.
     
    nojazzhere and StrangerNY like this.
  17. Ron C

    Ron C Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    842
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2006
    Location:
    Long Island, New York
    That's a very good distinction. I wasn't thinking along those lines when I responded to the OP. What you're describing is a whole other level of poor decision making that probably warrants some sessions with Dr. Melfi.
     
    telemaster03 likes this.
  18. saleake

    saleake Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

    Age:
    71
    Posts:
    371
    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2017
    Location:
    Texas
    I try to keep this in mind.

    “We need to learn how to want what we have NOT to have what we want in order to get steady and stable Happiness.”

    Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness

    Also, a guitar teacher of mine once told me, “You don’t need more gear, you need to practice!”
     
  19. NoTeleBob

    NoTeleBob Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,348
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2020
    Location:
    Southwestern, USA
    Now would be the time to sell them. If they net less than you paid, then it is what it is. No sense letting them sitting around unplayed.
     
  20. naveed211

    naveed211 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,536
    Joined:
    May 16, 2009
    Location:
    Iowa
    Well, there’s your problem. You’ve got to join one of those mega churches with the pastors constantly trying to justify their private jets.
     
    Addnine and StrangerNY like this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.