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How much would you guys pay for my partscasters?

Discussion in 'Other T-Types and Partscasters' started by 63 vibroverb, Oct 17, 2020.

  1. shallbe

    shallbe TDPRI Member

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    I built the guitar below as a furlough Covid project. Fat flamed Musikraft Blackguard neck, SS frets, bone nut, true old school hard nitro finish. Light swamp ash double bound Guitar Mill body. Lindy Fralin P90 and Sunbucker and controls, Forney bridge. The best parts I could get, and I spent a lot of time on it.

    I probably have $1300 in it. I like the way it looks, and it plays fantastic. Great sounds from both pickups---clear, sweet and noiseless. I own a lot of nice guitars, some custom builds. This is as nice as any of them, and I don't look to sell unless I go broke.

    A partscaster that offers nothing unique will not bring close to the parts cost. The more unique it is in terms of execution and parts, the better chance it will stand out and get some interest.

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. Danb541

    Danb541 Friend of Leo's

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    A MIM Fender neck is $300? I can find a used MIM telecaster for $350, the whole guitar, if I'm patient. I know because I bought several at that price.
    I've probably built 20 partscasters or more and would never expect to get more than the sum of their parts. This is hobby stuff. Anyone who considers resell value when buying a guitar is not going to pay much for a partscaster IMHO.
    The ones I have sold have gone to friends at a loss, which I'm fine with.

    Now on the flip side, if your setups are excellent and the guitars play and feel amazing, then someone might pay a premium and you might build a reputation. This situation, of course, means the buyer has to play the guitar. Which means local sales, which means fewer customers.
    If you decide to go that route, I would either source necks someplace else and create my own brand or rebrand the MIM necks. $300 for a MIM neck? You can buy a much better neck for $300. Do something coo land different to differentiate your guitars. Buy a neck from these guys.
    https://www.warmoth.com/Pages/ClassicShowcase.aspx?Body=1&Shape=4&Type=1
     
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  3. Weazel

    Weazel Tele-Holic

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    Guy..just leave it like that.
     
  4. sctrotts

    sctrotts TDPRI Member Gold Supporter

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    In the end your guitar is worth what someone is willing to pay for it I guess. Transparent up front in costs w/receipts might help some, but timing and the most enthusiastic buyer remains the game. Sometimes you'll win, sometimes you lose. I agree with someone elses post about branding your guitars as your own. Your work looks good and they are built with quality components. Get a good wood burning iron stamp made and pump em out with your own logo. Hell it's not like you didn't do the work. Find a bottom line you can live with and maybe it'll work. Who knows?
     
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  5. DHart

    DHart Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    Those look like great guitars and I'm sure they play wonderfully. They're probably worth at least $700 to a buyer who can some good get hands-on time, though few here, obviously, would pay you that.

    Best thing is to look to financial instruments as 'investments' and look to musical instruments as deeply pleasurable, personal hobbies.

    Build Fender-style guitars to suit your every desire, then play them, love them, and keep them.

    As I'm sure you know, once you've fully created a personalized Fender-style guitar, they most certainly will mean more to YOU, personally, than to anyone else who can assemble their own version, to their own specs. Creating your own, very personally-styled Fender guitar brings a deep sense of attachment.

    I'd say that the smart money would enjoy those beautiful creations and look elsewhere for financial/income pursuits.
     
  6. Kenzo76

    Kenzo76 TDPRI Member

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    I like that you're looking to build along the Vintera lines. That makes a lot of sense. Fender found something good with those.

    If you want to sell, I'd recommend getting different necks and your own logo. Suddenly you can move away from the "partscaster" label into something like "bespoke assembled." Obviously once you can make your own bodies it changes the game.

    The issue for me is I would need to play it to know if I want to pay for it.
     
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  7. LeeInAustin

    LeeInAustin Tele-Meister

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    OP, beautiful job on those bodies! Which dye did you go with on the translucent blue one? I've been playing around with a similar look.
     
  8. robbysturgis

    robbysturgis Tele-Holic

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    $150 for the blue. Perfect.
     
  9. psykobilly

    psykobilly Tele-Meister

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    I typically dismantle mine when I sell them also. Only way I can get close to getting my money back. Sad but true.
     
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  10. Russp

    Russp TDPRI Member

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    I'll comment though I'm not your target demographic. I agree with sudogeek that your bodies look really nice. I really like the blue one. That's a big selling point - looks. Personally I would only buy a partscaster if it had a very specific set of components that I was looking for - pickups being high on the list. And, with so many types to choose from, it's impossible to cater to everyone. How it sounds is the biggest factor for me - and that would mean having great YouTube demos of your guitars.

    For my part, I’m currently building 2 partscasters (Teles) for myself. I’m building these around what I consider to be two key components: a light MJT body (a known and reputable component that has its own fanbase) and secondly pickups. The pickup selection is a bit more vague and requires some experimentation - i.e. you’ll know when you hear them.

    As a side note, being dramatic about it, I consider partscasters worthless. I’d much rather own a genuine Fender. However recently I did buy an expensive partscaster (Strat) and, in doing so, sold 3 of my Fender Stratocasters because it sounded better than all of them. This was because I had the Stratocaster in my hands rather than buying a guitar without playing it. I had to think long and hard about buying it but, at the end of the day, there was no denying that it was a fantastic sounding guitar with fantastic (and expensive) pickups as well.
     
  11. burntfrijoles

    burntfrijoles Poster Extraordinaire

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    Those look very nice.
    Partscasters are not something I would ever consider. In fact, if I see a guitar has been modified I won’t consider it. I think partscasters are something you make for yourself.
    However if I were to consider a partscaster, it would be the cost of the materials plus a reasonable fee for assembly and set up.
     
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  12. greasamizer

    greasamizer TDPRI Member

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    I have built bout twenty guitars, strat, tellie, jazz master and j-bass copies-set up electrically to my tastes. Everything of worth costs something; it doesn't mean it will fetch a handsome price-or any at all, for that matter. I'm also a model railroader and have seen some beautiful structures, locomotives, and rolling stock selling for not too much more than the cost of the kit. My guitars are like my family in a way. None of them sound exactly alike. Would I sell them? Possibly, but I wouldn't go out of my say to do so; they will go to a collective when I die.
     
  13. GuitarDunc

    GuitarDunc TDPRI Member

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    Hi all, I've not posted in a long time...so here goes

    From another perspective...buying the parts putting them together, adding some nice finishing touches is all well and good, and I admit your guitar's look nice that you've done but as you've seen in these posts, every player has different ideas on what they would like as their dream guitar. If you're selling the guitars, have you considered if you are going to offer a guarantee for those parts (pickup's, machine heads, pots, wiring etc..) and if anything happens to the body or neck can you offer a replacement or repair service?
    If you buy a MIM from a music store and something is wrong with it (within a warranty period) you'll take it back and either get it sorted or replaced.
    What if you get a request to have different frets installed or lower action on the guitar, have you got the knowledge and experience to accommodate that request? you may have I don't know...just things to consider.

    Also if you're selling them with a fender neck, and it might be a genuine fender neck, the body isnt so I dont know how the law would see it if people think they're buying a fender when they're not. I think you'd have to remove the logo or buy non-fender necks, more to do with Fender suing you for everything you've got than anything else. As much as you can make it clear to someone that it's not a genuine fender, if they come to sell it at a music store they might try and sell it as a fender.

    and consideration is need if you're going to customize them per request or if they're 'sold as seen'

    Just a few thoughts from me ;)
     
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  14. David Menke

    David Menke TDPRI Member

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    Like most of the posts here, I have a hobby of putting together partcasters. I purchase bodies from Warmoth and also necks from Warmoth. I do have one neck from USA guitars, prior to there move, purchased years back. The time and energy, to finish the guitars, with all expensive hardware, Gotoh, Seymour Duncan, Fralin, some fender parts and the paint and supplies to complete the instrument. On some of them, having Warmoth finish the neck, and some bodies, adds to the cost of the instrument. Then I have an excellent setup done, not GC, by a guitar tech once it is completed. Typical cost to complete is usually around $1200 to 1500 but these guitars, play better than my Fenders due to neck radius, frets and hardware. A parts guitar does not reap you rewards. People want the real Ford Cobra, not a kit car.
    Don't expect to make a guitar, home grown, unless you have a Guitar Shop, and competing with the big boys, to sell for what you put into it. IT IS FOR YOUR pleasure.
    I would never put a Fender Decal on my parts guitars, unless it came on a purchased Fender Neck.
    If you were EVH then you could put together a parts guitar, and have Fender make a copy and sell it for $25,000. One of my parts, a beauty! Red Tele Warmoth.jpg Red Tele.jpg
     
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  15. Drew617

    Drew617 Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    No intent to knock the OP or his guitars at all, rather pointing out the issues I see with partscasters in general... $not much. I've built several of my own and they were decent guitars, one was really excellent. All were something specific that I wanted at the time but couldn't buy at retail.

    So, the issues:

    1. Building a bolt neck guitar just doesn't require exceptional skill. If I'm gonna acquire one I may as well build it myself. I'll know exactly what care went into construction and fitment.

    2. Building doesn't require exceptional skill, but I still occasionally see partscasters for sale that are obvious garbage. Appears to me that far too many people are willing to buy GFS bodies and a hand drill and call themselves luthiers, custom builders, whatever. That's sometimes apparent in simple things: The neck pocket, alignment of bridges and tuners and other components. Other sins won't be apparent, which is even scarier. How do I know the builder knows when to make pilot holes? That he didn't wreck the neck when installing it? A lot of people really can't solder. From an unknown hobbyist builder, everything is suspect, so value to me is something less than parts cost. New parts can at least be assumed to not be ruined.

    3. Fender neck or not, that ain't a Fender. I think that's legal by Reverb etc. standards but still "not genuine" to my thinking or preference, and I wouldn't buy it. You, and presumably a buyer, are paying something for that Fender logo and I think it's of no value here. If I were assembling something for resale, I'd either go downmarket and get an unbranded Allparts neck, or spend the same money on something better like a Warmoth.
     
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  16. Muadzin

    Muadzin Tele-Meister

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    As has been said, partscasters are worth less then the parts you paid for them. It's like building DIY guitar pedals, you buy something that is highly customized to suit the needs of the builder. But the builder's needs may not be my own. I've even asked some DIY guitar builders how much their pedals would be for sale if they would ditch the enclosures as I would prefer to have the working circuits, but in my own enclosures, customized to my needs, as in top mounted jacks only. At least when I buy a name brand guitar I know what I will get and if I really want something that suits my own needs I build something for myself instead.
    It's all about brand name value and you and I have none. It takes years of hard work to become a success, even the boutique guitar builders had to start from scratch.

    I've built some 19 guitars by now and people keep telling me, why aren't you selling these? They don't understand how conservative the market is and its the building the brand that is more important then building the actual guitars. And which will take a lot longer.

    Harley Benton can build them even cheaper and at a decent quality then I can, just on wood alone.

    For free they might still be interesting, just to harvest them for parts.

    The Pope is progressive compared to guitar players. Hell, even ISIS is progressive compared to guitar players. They at least don't mind using modern stuff. Most of us are just permanently stuck in the '50's. If it ain't got tubes or 50's wiring, we're not interested.

    That's the power of stardom. Just like how Matt Bellamy's custom guitars from a local English guitar builder turned Manson guitars into a brand. When you're famous people want your ****. No offense to Eddy, who lived in a different time where you had less access to information, but from an objective POV his Frankenstrat is a terrible hack job when you look it up close. I'd be ashamed if I would build a guitar like he did.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2020
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  17. marc2211

    marc2211 Tele-Holic

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    I love building partscasters, normally strats. My main guitar is now a wonderful Warmoth build.

    The last one I sold was a vintage white Ash body. 50’s classic MIM neck. Vintage cloth electrics, Texas Specials, Fender hardware.

    It cost me about 1200€ in parts. Despite it playing nicely, it really wasn’t my thing and I hated it... in the end I got 350€ for it after 4 months on the market.
     
  18. dv

    dv TDPRI Member

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    Yep, you have to part out your partscaster if you want to break even. If you buy a partscaster already built, you can likely make money on it parting it out. Just the way it is.
     
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  19. dv

    dv TDPRI Member

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    I would have to agree with this. I was fortunate to get to play one of the very limited fabled Frankenstrat clones that were sold for $25K years ago. It was shocking how really hacked the guitar was in person, the very loose neck pocket, terrible paint, chiseled pickup routes, the nasty rusty wiring and smoke damage, the high action,etc etc. It also affirmed to me that the genius of Ed's playing was truly in his hands, if he could play anything on a guitar like that so poorly set up. Amazing really, and they all left the factory apparently set up exactly like the way Ed played his.
     
  20. Askwhy

    Askwhy Tele-Meister

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    So to answer the question simply, I would be looking at 600ish for a quality partscaster like yours if I saw it for sale locally. I think the 300 posts are silly, 600 is right around what a used quality MIM cray strat or similar goes for. Here's the rub though, if it wasn't really close to exactly what I wanted, I would not have interest at any price. If it was a CAR nitro, large vneck carve, hardtail, rosewood board, ss medium fret strat built the way your others are- I would be extremely interested up to 1K. See the problem though?
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2020
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