How much does the condition of a guitar affect its value?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Digiplay, Aug 8, 2019.

  1. Digiplay

    Digiplay Tele-Meister

    Age:
    66
    Posts:
    146
    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2019
    Location:
    Birmingham, Alabama
    I asked the following on the B Bender Forum, but please chime in on the bottom line point of how much the condition of a Telecasters (or ANY guitar) affects its value if/when selling:






    This is the business side of me talking now, and I need other Members input, as you have forgotten more about Telecasters than I'll EVER know :)


    I'll use my 2011 3 tone Sunburst Nashville B Bender (with original G&L case) as the proverbial poster child.


    1) If it was brand new, never been played, what do you guess it would be worth?
    2) It it had been played, but was still in new/mint condition, what do you guess it would be worth?
    3) It it was in excellent condition, but had just a few very few small nicks/scratches, what do you guess it would be worth?
    4) It it was in very good condition, but had a few more small nicks/scratches than the above # 3 guitar, what do you guess it would be worth?
    5) It it was in good condition, but had more nicks/scratches than any of the above guitars, what do you guess it would be worth?


    I know the answer is probably open to debate, but I'm relying on your past experience as to what the condition of my B Bender, heck ANY Telecaster for that matter, has upon its value to potential buyers.


    Does the condition affect its value more or less than what an inexperienced novice (read that as me) would assume it does?


    I'm assuming (uh oh) that it affects it a LOT, even though "a LOT" is relative to ones financial situation :)


    Thanks,
    Jerry
     
    dlew919 likes this.
  2. dlew919

    dlew919 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,539
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2012
    Location:
    Sydney
    Pretty much if you buy new and sell it straight away you can expect a 20-30-% haircut.

    Conditiin is a funny thing. It tire in with provenance. If you look at willie Nelson’s trigger or bill monroes mandolin, both are worn almost beyond usability. But would get hundreds of thousands of dollars.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  3. Digiplay

    Digiplay Tele-Meister

    Age:
    66
    Posts:
    146
    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2019
    Location:
    Birmingham, Alabama
    But the guitar I was referring to in #'s 2 to 5 (the 2011 Nashville B Bender) is used, not to mention that it's a Telecaster 60th Anniversary model, and Nashville B Benders are no longer made.


    Regardless, what effect would the various conditions have on the price of the haircut? :)
     
    dlew919 likes this.
  4. colnago

    colnago Tele-Meister

    Age:
    44
    Posts:
    193
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2017
    Location:
    The Great White North
    More like millions of dollars.
     
    dlew919 likes this.
  5. colnago

    colnago Tele-Meister

    Age:
    44
    Posts:
    193
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2017
    Location:
    The Great White North
    I try to buy only near mint guitars that are used. I’ll pay 60-70% of new price. If it is pretty beat I’ll pass unless it is more in the 30% of new price range and then I’d consider getting it to refinish it.

    Played but mint(no signs of wear is what mint is) = 70% of new price
    Excellent = 60%
    Very good = 50%
    Good = 40%
    Meh, pretty beat = 30%
     
  6. dlew919

    dlew919 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,539
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2012
    Location:
    Sydney
    Maybe actually. Gilmour strat was 2 million want it? And as far as I can tell only the body and maybe the strap holders were original. Clapton’s Blackie which is really anpartscaster and has a fair bit of wear cleared 1 million.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  7. Dacious

    Dacious Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,749
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Location:
    Godzone
    Not all rare is good. Dimestore guitars can be rare and some like old Danos worth much more than new, but a lot are landfill.

    A desirable model that is no longer made is often worth more. I recently sold a minty black Joan Jett Sig Melody Maker for $400 more than new. They were only a grand new. One of the few Gibby sigs worth more than new in 2010. Try that with a Slash, Ace Frehley, Jimmy, Gary Moore!

    A discontinued B-Benderis hard. The market is smallish. If someone wants what you have it's worth a lot.

    If it was discontinued because of low demand - that ominous for resale. Marshall made a country club amp aiming at the Fender Twin market. Great amp, sold miniscule numbers.

    In that circumstance the newer/less relicc'd the better.
     
    dented and dlew919 like this.
  8. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,414
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Location:
    Charlotte NC
    the model, availability and desire , are worth more than the condition. A typical everyday , they are everywhere guitar , very little desire , will have a significant markdown. The B Bender, the value is in the model, not necessarily they type of Fender that it is or the extreme mint condition. A quality nice condition USED guitar will be more desirable but may not command a premium price . It will sell sooner rather than later while a ratty guitar may not sell at all.

    B Benders, while they appear to be popular, really are not. Players buy them , pay big bucks, learn a few licks and then get worn out with the 2 or 3 licks they know and then re-sell them.
    B Benders are not a novelty but many players treat them as such. The market is limited , especially at the north of $1000 price. Too much money invested to let it hang on the wall or live in the case.
     
  9. Sparky2

    Sparky2 Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    2,165
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2017
    Location:
    Harvest, Alabama
    Fjestad's Blue Book is a great starting point.

    They list your 2011 Fender Nashville B Bender Telecaster (Model 011-8342) as having had, back in the day, an MSRP of $2,400.

    The model was produced from summer 2000 until the end of the 2015 model year.

    Value now, depending upon condition. is listed like so:


    100% New Condition - $1,700
    98% Mint Condition - $1,350
    95% Excellent Plus Condition - $1,125
    90% Excellent Condition - $925
    80% Very Good Plus Condition - $750
    70% Very Good Condition - $625
    60% Good Condition - $500

    The year doesn't particularly add value, since 2011 was simply the Anniversary Year of the origin of the Telecaster guitar.

    There WAS a 2011 (made in 2011 only) Fender model known as the 60th Anniversary Telecaster (Model 011-6112), but it's worth hundreds less than your B Bender.

    I hope this helps.

    :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
    Wally likes this.
  10. PCollen

    PCollen Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,342
    Joined:
    May 7, 2010
    Location:
    Man of the World
    Is it MIA or MIM ?
     
  11. KG7IL

    KG7IL TDPRI Member

    Age:
    66
    Posts:
    45
    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2019
    Location:
    Eatonville, WA edge of cowtown
    Cars, Coins, Couch....
    Condition means everything . . .

    If there is nothing else special about an item, then condition dictates price.

    I don't think Willy's Trigger is part ofv this discussion.

    The price on Unique or Novelty items are driven by other factors.. The back-story is the value... not the guitar.
     
    boredguy6060, Wally and rangercaster like this.
  12. rangercaster

    rangercaster Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,897
    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Location:
    portland, or
    Condition is a huge factor in value ...
    Especially in collector circles ...
    Players market, it is less a factor ...
     
    boredguy6060 and Wally like this.
  13. DekeDog

    DekeDog Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    192
    Joined:
    May 12, 2019
    Location:
    Carolina
    Apparently, it's worth more if the factory tears it up.

    I traveled almost two hours to a brick and mortar store to check out a used LP Traditional Pro, don't remember the year... wanted $1000... said it was in good condition. The pictures looked good, but I was told it was a "player's guitar" (which should have been a tipoff right there). When I saw it in person, I was really disappointed. The thing looked like it had been in battle. I wouldn't have paid more than $500 for it, even if it had once belonged to Gary Moore. Live and learn.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019
    verb boten and idjster like this.
  14. idjster

    idjster VERY grateful member Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    4,698
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    Location:
    Saskatchewan, Canada
    How do you know if a guitar that was sold new as a relic guitar is in mint shape? And I mean this in all seriousness. Relicing isn't the same on each guitar so there's nothing to compare other than the attachments (tuners, frets, electrical components) of the guitar.
     
    verb boten likes this.
  15. verb boten

    verb boten Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    550
    Joined:
    May 12, 2019
    Location:
    Indiana
    A mystery to me when analyzing this situation is: relics sometimes go for big money, so when does a worn-in guitar go from well-played to actual relic and how does it affect price?
    I have seen a few advertised as "natural relic" but don't remember the prices.
     
  16. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,601
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2014
    Location:
    Lions & Tigers oh Mi !
    Here's where I see the price points, it's a bath tub effect.

    0) Brand new at the store = 80% of MSRP/MAP because there is a 15%-20% off sale "just for asking my favorite internet sales associate"

    1) "brand new, never played" = 65%
    2) "played, but was still in new/mint condition" = 60% (these are the guitars on the high racks at GC, NOS)
    3) "excellent condition, but had just a few very few small nicks/scratches" = 50% (these are the guitars on the low racks at GC, NOS)
    4) "very good condition, but had a few more small nicks/scratches" = 48%
    5) "good condition, but had more nicks/scratches than any of the above guitars" = 45%

    6) gigged, light relic, so a lot of use and wear but "plays like butter" = 50%
    7) gigged for a decade, "those appear to be finish cracks not wood cracks", has only five strings but "you can buy new strings for like $5" = Mojo = 55%
    8) medium relic, hardly played but wore a chain mail suit on stage, plays well and feels like good old jeans (or a new factory relic sold used too) = 65%
    9) heavy relic, war zone rescue, massive player mojo, "plays like greasy wings and butter" because there is still residue = 75%

    Get Gilmour to play a guitar that replaced seven necks and three bodies and ... is that even the original guitar we are bidding on? = Priceless

    The reason for the tub effect is that the number of potential buyers drops at each damage level, but the passion by the few remaining buyers goes way up as the damage levels increase.

    .
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019
  17. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    19,161
    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2008
    Location:
    Detroit

    Never deal in percentages of brand new .



    The market only works one way: what things sell/have sold for .

    Easy enough both on craigslist and eBay .

    8 yr old consumer grade guitar ?

    Not a hard search.

    +/- what they have gone for in similar condition ?

    That’s what they will go for.

    Percentages ! :rolleyes:

    Like I need another thing to remember...:lol:
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019
    rangercaster likes this.
  18. tubelectron

    tubelectron Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    382
    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2010
    Location:
    France
    How much does the condition of a guitar affect its value?

    Greatly. At least for me. That's why I try to maintain my guitars in premium condition.

    A relic'ed guitar has no value for me : it's a mistreated, damaged instrument. And if it is intentional, it's a fake.

    But it's me, OK ? :D
     
  19. String Tree

    String Tree Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    14,216
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Location:
    Up North
    It all boils down to who would want to buy it in the first place.

    Go back in time.
    How much would you have paid for that same instrument from an individual seller, knowing full well that it was 8 years-old?
    It wasn't owned by a superstar, it isn't on any Gold Records, it never went on the road with anybody.

    I have the same issues with my guitars.
     
    rangercaster likes this.
  20. Jakedog

    Jakedog Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    17,178
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2003
    Location:
    The North Coast
    How much does condition impact value?

    According to every used guitar listing I’ve ever seen, that’s entirely dependent on whether you’re buying it, or selling it.
     
    brookdalebill likes this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.