How far can I extend router bit?

Yonatan

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The idea was that the point would go through the already drilled holes for the control pots
Scratch that idea, spade bits don't like to self center in an existing hole, should have seen that coming.

Leaning on the side of safety isn't a bad thing either.
That was my thought, I'll get a longer cutter for next time around, for now I got the switch and pots installed by using Forstners and a chisel.
 

King-of-Tone

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Listen to the good advice you're getting, don't take any chances with router bits make sure they're secured properly in the router.

I used to play right-handed and was a decent player, until a table saw accident in 2004 took off some fingers on my left hand. The hand surgeon was able to re-attach them, but they don't work quite as good as they used to (my wedding band was on my ring finger, the blade caught that and made a mess of my ring finger bone, making it difficult to re-build and re-attach). Anyways I switched to playing left-handed a few years ago, I'm nowhere near as good but I'm still enjoying playing guitar and bass.

I had a lot of follow-up hand surgeries and PT, and got friendly with the hand surgeon. He also played guitar, he's a great guy. One of our appointments he mentioned hey at least your injury was a cut by a table saw, and you found and brought your fingers into the ED with you so I could re-attach them. I've worked on router injuries, and there's usually nothing much left to re-attach just a pile of bloody goo.
 

Yonatan

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Listen to the good advice you're getting, don't take any chances with router bits make sure they're secured properly in the router.

I used to play right-handed and was a decent player, until a table saw accident in 2004 took off some fingers on my left hand. The hand surgeon was able to re-attach them, but they don't work quite as good as they used to (my wedding band was on my ring finger, the blade caught that and made a mess of my ring finger bone, making it difficult to re-build and re-attach). Anyways I switched to playing left-handed a few years ago, I'm nowhere near as good but I'm still enjoying playing guitar and bass.

I had a lot of follow-up hand surgeries and PT, and got friendly with the hand surgeon. He also played guitar, he's a great guy. One of our appointments he mentioned hey at least your injury was a cut by a table saw, and you found and brought your fingers into the ED with you so I could re-attach them. I've worked on router injuries, and there's usually nothing much left to re-attach just a pile of bloody goo.
Thank you for sharing your story and your message.
 

oldunc

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Another possibility- mostly ignored by guitar people-is the template guide. This attaches to the router base and guides the cut independent of the bit, so you can change depths without fooling around with super thick or moving templates. Of course you have to make your own templates, but if you've any ambition to actually learn guitar making (or pretty much any woodworking) that's a vital skill- making jigs, fixtures and templates is the main challenge, and most of the fun, in machine woodworking.
 

TenaciousP

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A few years ago, I switched to using router bushings that attach to the router base. I don’t have to worry about whether or not a bearing can ride on the template or if the bit is too long or too short to do so. Also I don’t ever Forstner bit out the cavities before hand either. I just plunge an 1/8” or a 1/4” sometimes and route all of the material at that depth. Then plunge more and repeat. Of course, as mentioned above, you have to make special templates with over sized pockets to account for the bushing diameter difference relative to the bit diameter. But it works really well.
 

greasamizer

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Go on the 'Rockler' site. They have a pretty good selection of router bits. Do NOT monkey around with jerry-rigging a bit; they can do considerable damage to both project and humanity with one split-second fell swoop. If your router has the capacity for a 1/2" collet, get one-and get 1/2" bits. you will have better selection and a safer cleaner job.
 

fathand

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Go on the 'Rockler' site. They have a pretty good selection of router bits. Do NOT monkey around with jerry-rigging a bit; they can do considerable damage to both project and humanity with one split-second fell swoop. If your router has the capacity for a 1/2" collet, get one-and get 1/2" bits. you will have better selection and a safer cleaner job.

8mm bits and collets are strong enough for many things and have a great selection but are hard to find in N America.
 

oldunc

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Go on the 'Rockler' site. They have a pretty good selection of router bits. Do NOT monkey around with jerry-rigging a bit; they can do considerable damage to both project and humanity with one split-second fell swoop. If your router has the capacity for a 1/2" collet, get one-and get 1/2" bits. you will have better selection and a safer cleaner job.



I stopped buying Rockler router bits after a couple of disturbing failures, but last I heard they carried the entire Amana line, which are excellent. Woodcraft stores carry (or carried) Whiteside bits, which are very good.
 

oldunc

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8mm bits and collets are strong enough for many things and have a great selection but are hard to find in N America.


They're available for small tools like the Roto Zip or Dremel tool. They're okay up to a point, but things like routing a cavity on a guitar can put considerable lateral stress on the bit, for that sort of work 1/2" is much to be preferred.
 

guitarbuilder

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They're available for small tools like the Roto Zip or Dremel tool. They're okay up to a point, but things like routing a cavity on a guitar can put considerable lateral stress on the bit, for that sort of work 1/2" is much to be preferred.


The OP is using a laminate trimmer.
 

Yonatan

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is what he bought this year I guess
That looks like the one. I got it mainly for routing cavities (and not for heavier duty tasks like body shaping or thicknessing stock). so far seems like it's sturdy enough for that. I'm removing as much as I can with Forstners and chisels, so it's mainly to trim up to the sides and trim down to final depth.

I guess I need a longer bit to handle the deeper cavities.
 

DrASATele

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I mark the 1/2 point of the shaft on all my bits and never extend them past that point. Because I had 1 bit, in a router table set up, while trying to do a truss rod channel, come out of the router and up into the wood, scared the hell out of me. So I bought 1/2 diameter bits in several lengths so that if my template only gets me so far, I can switch bits to get the rest of what I need. Making templates with various thickness can help too. Most of mine are 3/4 inch but I have some that are 1/4 and 3/8 for control cavities and pickups depending the need.
 

Yonatan

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A few years ago, I switched to using router bushings that attach to the router base. I don’t have to worry about whether or not a bearing can ride on the template or if the bit is too long or too short to do so.
Just watched some videos demonstrating the use of guide bushings - looks really cool. But I'll have to get a "real" router for that!
 




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