How far can I extend router bit?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Yonatan, Jun 10, 2021.

  1. GotTheSilver

    GotTheSilver Tele-Meister

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    Buy a longer bit. Period.
     
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  2. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Poster Extraordinaire

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    The shallow Stew-Mac bit that you have is the wrong tool for this job. End of story.

    If a router bit is not deep enough, you don't just cheat it out to get the depth you need. You get the right bit.

    Get a standard top bearing flush trim bit, like the ones you can get at any decent hardware or tool store.

    The shallow Stew-Mac one has one use: to allow you to use thin (e.g. 1/4") templates when making the relatively shallow routs needed for certain guitar applications.
     
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  3. carpenter

    carpenter Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    True story when i was probably 14 or so I took and put a 1/4" flat blade drill bit in a router. At that age i did not even know what a router was. So I turned it on bit bent in half in the middle let loose of the chuck and stuck in the panel wall. I have the greatest respect for routers and fear. so buy the right bit please.
     
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  4. adjason

    adjason Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    as has been said buy a longer bit. Most accidents happen when folks do things they know they shouldn't but they do it anyway
     
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  5. Hags

    Hags Tele-Meister

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    Remove templet and use what you routed as a guide
    If I understand the problem
     
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  6. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    yep, rout the last bit down using the body instead of the template...... those control routs are a bit of a stretch...


    I use a trimmer as well..
     
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  7. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    • Here's your answer from the source.....
    Using Ball-bearing Cutter Bits for Guitar Routing | stewmac.com

    Using Ball-bearing Cutter Bits for Guitar Routing

    Instructions for using Ball-bearing Cutter Bits for guitar routing.

    [​IMG]
    I-0583
    [​IMG]

    Heat-resistant tubing is supplied with your cutter bit to keep the bearing from riding up the shank. You can also use the tubing below the bit to raise the bearing to a height that will ride against your template should this become necessary, but always take up the gap between the bearing and collet with more tubing. Be sure to cut the ends squarely. Keep at least 1/2" of shank in the collet at all times. It may also be necessary to raise the entire template with shims to make contact with the bearing for shallow passes. It is always better to make several shallow passes as opposed to fewer deep passes.
     
  8. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    tubing? my router bits have small collars above the bearing to lock them down.
     
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  9. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Stewmac bits come with a length of tubing so you can use multiple bearings. Two bearings are pretty good insurance in case one fails. I had one fail one time. Little ball bearings all over the place, a melted plastic template, and a little more body work....

    The tubing fits pretty snug to the shaft. You could use collars with allen screws too I bet. I wouldn't be surprised if Whiteside makes those bits too...they are long lasting and way sharper than home center bits.
     
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  10. oldunc

    oldunc Tele-Holic

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    It's really not worth taking a chance; router bits should be inserted to full depth, then pulled up a bit-1/16" or so- so they're not in contact with the bottom of the collet. If you're going to stick with guitar work, get a longer bit. A 1/2" shank upcut spiral bit is the best for that sort of job, but of course you need a 1/2" collet.
     
  11. Bob J

    Bob J Tele-Meister

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    “Keep at least 1/2” of shank in collet at all times” ?!?!???!?!!!!!!!

    that’s enough to scare me.
     
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  12. NoTeleBob

    NoTeleBob Tele-Afflicted

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    Spade bit traditionally has a leading point to drill a pilot and steady the bit as it cuts. That will go right through the body.

    Took me decades to realize that when I say to myself "This is a stupid idea" that it really is - and I should stop immediately.
     
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  13. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I can get deep enough @35mm with either a 3/4" or 1" bit in my trimmer..... off the body.

    without needing to slide it halfway out of the collet...

    router bit 1.jpg router bit2.jpg
     
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  14. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    This. Listen to Old Unc. You can, and should, avoid bottoming out the bit in the collet, but don't attempt to buy extra cutting depth by extending the bit more than a 16th or so. When a bit lets go, it goes like a bullet. Its a sharp hunk of metal spinning with enough energy to tear multiple holes in whatever it flies into. When mine let go, it tore 4 or 5 holes in the formica top of the bench I was working on, then crashed into the wall 25 feet away. I hadn't tightened it down enough. I recommend, don't take any chances.
     
  15. Yonatan

    Yonatan Tele-Holic

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    The idea was that the point would go through the already drilled holes for the control pots. But I just remembered my router plane, need to check how deep it goes.
     
  16. Yonatan

    Yonatan Tele-Holic

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    I knew I read that quote somewhere, it's probably in the instruction sheet that StewMac supplied with the bit.

    On the other hand, seems that many folks here are not convinced that it's enough.
     
  17. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    First of all, I learned that the bit shank shouldn't be jammed in all the way of a collet, so I always insert it and then retract it some. Collets vary in length too, depending on the router but they aren't a bottomless pit...they have a certain length that grips the shank and the rest is unsupported. The more it sticks out, the more leverage you put on it.


    Bosch PR20EVS Router (2 Pack) Replacement 1/4 inch Collet Chuck # 2610008122-2PK - Bosch Colt Collet - Amazon.com



    Then you have to consider the quality of the collet and the bit itself. I have a dewalt trimmer that even when the collet is loose, the bit isn't the easiest to remove. Quality bits will probably have a better fit than crap bits.

    You'll always find people that say the moon is made out of green cheese and then there are others who say it isn't. No matter what question you ask here, you'll get both sides presented.

    You can do the measurements and see how much of the bit goes into the collet and then make your own determination on whether it is safe for the operation at hand. The more experience with this stuff you can get will help you out. I'd be concerned about doing the task without a large base to support the router over the control cavity. Tilting the router isn't going to help out your project.


    Leaning on the side of safety isn't a bad thing either. You should read and follow the safety rules supplied with your router. See #19 below :).

    Safety Tips for your Router (woodcraft.com)

    Since you seem to be getting into the hobby, I'd invest in the 1" long bit and if you can afford it, a second router. :).


    For something that is just a secondary bit that isn't your work horse, something like this would be OK.

    1/2" Flush Trim Template Router Bit - 1/4" Shank - Yonico 14074q 603915000617 | eBay
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2021
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  18. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity

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    the way I do such... Using a ¾ inch thick template... I'll make the first cut ⅜ deep.... I'll do that with a ¾ inch long bit... I follow up, again with the template, and now using a 1/inch bit, cut it to a depth of 3/4 inches...

    I now remove the template, and using the walls of the cavity... I make the additional cuts, typically ⅜ at a time.. until the correct depth is achieved..

    I buy additional bearings, and will add a couple to the shaft so that if one burns out... there's backup.. all ya need is for one to burn out in the middle of a rout to appreciate that... I also have my router fitted with an extra large base so that it covers both sides of whatever I'm routing. That way there's no chance of one free floating edge of the base to drop slightly and "mess" up the walls of the cavity..

    I also keep around a few bits 2" long for those situations where the above simply will not work.. and I also cut the main cavity before I come back and cut the recess for the cover plate...

    and I to recommend those Yonico bits.. while not of the same calibre of a Whiteside, Amana, etc.. for "plowing" and general run of the mill work.. and at that price they're fine..
     
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  19. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Afflicted

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    I have to agree on this one, especially with the heavy hog cuts you're taking there.

    I have two flush cutting pattern bits, one with 1/2" of cutter and another with 1.25" of cutter. Start with the shallow one on the template, then the first pass becomes the template.

    Even though I have a huge, powerful plunge router, I remove most of the waste with forstner bits in the drill press, leaving only a few mm's of clean up to do with the pattern bit. MUCH safe and less dust to worry about.
     
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  20. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire

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    I would suggest buying a router with a 1/4 & 1/2 chuck, then you have all kinds of options for bits. If guitar building is something you going to continue invest in the right tool for the job. I know a lot of people use these little laminate trim routers for building guitars yeah they work but at the same time your pushing it beyond what it was designed for and that can be a safety issue.
     
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