How does one cure impulsiveness?

Toto'sDad

Tele Axpert
Ad Free Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2011
Posts
56,724
Location
Bakersfield
Tools are a rabbit hole. I had a huge collection I built from about the time I was fifteen years old to about the time I was 40. Much of it was stuff that had belonged to my dad, or stuff he’d given me as gifts when I was young.

It was all stolen when my garage was burglarized while we were living out in Denver. Every last piece. I’ve slowly built back up since then. But only what I exactly need, when I need it. If something comes up that I need a tool for, I go get that tool. That’s as far as I’ll take it.

Truthfully though, I don’t really work on stuff. I’m not handy and I have no desire to be. At all. I hate broken stuff, and I hate fixing it more. I grew up in a situation where money was scarce, and everything was crappy/cobbled together. Cars were always garbage, so you either learned to wrench, or you walked. It didn’t teach me to be thrifty, or resourceful, it forced me to be. I hated it. I always said that when I grew up I wasn’t fixing screwed up stuff anymore.

It was a huge day for me when I reached a point that I could pay a mechanic to fix my car and not mess with it myself. It was a huger day when I reached a point that when I’d had enough of the car misbehaving, I just went and bought a new one.

Now I have a guy for everything. I’ve got an army of guys. Plumbing? I’ve got a guy. Electric? I’ve got a guy. Carpentry? Drywall? Fence? Paint? I’ve got a guy for all that stuff. And I pay them happily, so that I can spend MY time doing things I actually enjoy.

I get no sense of satisfaction whatsoever from doing work myself. All I get is pissed off.

The only things I work on myself are my guitars. That’s only because I have to have them in tip top shape or they drive me nuts, and I have never found anyone besides myself who can handle them as well as I do. If I found a guy for that, he’d be getting my business.

Moral of the story- I don’t have many tools. Just what I really need. Now gear? Y’all just mind your own business. Lol.
I have worked as a mechanic, or field mechanic, in car garages, tractor shops, on the farm, and always did my own mechanic work. I have pulled the engine from my car, taken it to work, bored it, installed new cam bushings, and in general totally rebuilt, and reinstalled it.

Many years ago, when I was hauling heavy equipment, I did a brake job on my pickup truck probably at midnight after working all day. Got up with only a couple of hours sleep and went to work the next day. It's cost me two hundred bucks. My wife the next day called around to get a price for a brake job on my truck. Several places quoted her two hundred bucks.

I learned a huge lesson. I work on a few things, but not many. I would much rather as you say, have someone do it, than do it myself. Once in a while, I CAN'T get something fixed and have to do it myself. The exception being computers, and guitars if I can't fix it, I get another one of either. EVERYTIME, I have fallen for having a BIG famous guy work on my guitar I have been disappointed with ONE exception. I learned a lesson there too.
 

imwjl

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Mar 21, 2007
Posts
12,013
Location
My mom's basement.
I'm on month 14 looking at my next vehicle project. it is coming, just not this minute.
Something funny there is realizing scale makes bicycle projects more manageable than stuff with engines and 100% more wheels. It burns off a beer a little better. I can't hang autos or pickups in the garage. This week my wife said I'm cute when I project and I thought she'd think differently if I was standing at an engine stand in the driveway.

:)
 

kuch

Tele-Holic
Joined
Sep 30, 2011
Posts
524
Location
Great Northwest
I mean I probably spent close to $400 the last couple weeks on tools lol. But I’m pretty much done. Not to sound morbid. But my father in law was a mechanic for Honda for YEARS before his stroke. He’s made it clear to everyone that I’ll get his tools when that time comes (although I hope it’s still many years). So a armory of Snap on and American made craftsman tools.

So my plan was to just get the basics for household things. But then “oh, I need this!” And “this would be useful!”

I’m actually mildly autistic, with mild Asperger’s. I know that’s part of the impulsive mentality. But I’m also not one to sit and blame it. I’m very controlling in the sense I have to have everything and in its own place. But disorder or not. There’s gotta be a trick to curbing it lol

Pressure washer, compressor, chain saw, sawzall, table saw, planer, jigsaw, sprayer, ladders, scaffold, ......

Les Paul, 335, 330, strat, tele, jazzmaster, 175, twin reverb, bandmaster, marshall, vox, swart, ......

On and on....

If you don't actually need something for a project that you're working on today or tomorrow, walk away.... it will still be there next week.
One thing that works for me is that I love bargains. And sometimes this takes planning. If I'm looking at a project coming up, sometimes a year in advance, I'll make a list of things I would need to complete the project and look for it used or wait for it to go on sale. This helps to spread the cost of things over time. Most of the time it works for me.

Or just hire it out.

Good luck
 

Happy Enchilada

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Mar 25, 2021
Posts
3,068
Location
God's Country
Tools are a rabbit hole. I had a huge collection I built from about the time I was fifteen years old to about the time I was 40. Much of it was stuff that had belonged to my dad, or stuff he’d given me as gifts when I was young.

It was all stolen when my garage was burglarized while we were living out in Denver. Every last piece. I’ve slowly built back up since then. But only what I exactly need, when I need it. If something comes up that I need a tool for, I go get that tool. That’s as far as I’ll take it.

Truthfully though, I don’t really work on stuff. I’m not handy and I have no desire to be. At all. I hate broken stuff, and I hate fixing it more. I grew up in a situation where money was scarce, and everything was crappy/cobbled together. Cars were always garbage, so you either learned to wrench, or you walked. It didn’t teach me to be thrifty, or resourceful, it forced me to be. I hated it. I always said that when I grew up I wasn’t fixing screwed up stuff anymore.

It was a huge day for me when I reached a point that I could pay a mechanic to fix my car and not mess with it myself. It was a huger day when I reached a point that when I’d had enough of the car misbehaving, I just went and bought a new one.

Now I have a guy for everything. I’ve got an army of guys. Plumbing? I’ve got a guy. Electric? I’ve got a guy. Carpentry? Drywall? Fence? Paint? I’ve got a guy for all that stuff. And I pay them happily, so that I can spend MY time doing things I actually enjoy.

I get no sense of satisfaction whatsoever from doing work myself. All I get is pissed off.

The only things I work on myself are my guitars. That’s only because I have to have them in tip top shape or they drive me nuts, and I have never found anyone besides myself who can handle them as well as I do. If I found a guy for that, he’d be getting my business.

Moral of the story- I don’t have many tools. Just what I really need. Now gear? Y’all just mind your own business. Lol.
^^^^Wow, it's like I wrote this myself! My dad had 3 screwdrivers (one Phillips, 2 flathead), 2 pairs of pliers (one slipjoint, one visegrip), and a ball peen hammer - all for emergency repairs to last until a qualified professional could get there. Over the years, experience has taught me that it's way cheaper and way less frustrating to pay a guy who has the tools and knows how to use 'em than to spend a weekend in hell making 7 trips to Home Depot. After all, those guys have families to feed too.

We all have "tools," whether we are conscious of it or not. My "tools" happen to involve my ability to write and deliver first-rate work in truncated timeframes. My son's "tools" are his knowledge of math, science, and computers, which he applies to his work as a mechanical engineer. I hope he's smart enough to know the difference between something he can actually fix himself and something that requires professional help (i.e., anything involving plumbing for starters).

I too drove "fixer upper" cars for decades. I have bought 4 new cars in my time: One when I got my first real job after college, one years later when we needed a pickup, one for my wife because my oldest totaled his car coming home for Christmas, and more recently my Colorado. Before the Colorado, I drove a '99 Explorer Sport for 16 years (bought it used, ran it up to 197K). Did all the maintenance whenever required, and it was running like a sewing machine when it got traded. Now that I'm too old to bust my knuckles on a wrench, it's great to have a vehicle that doesn't ask me to.

Or as Clint said in one of his films, "A wise man knows his limitations."
 

Harry Styron

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Aug 2, 2011
Posts
3,420
Location
Branson, Mo
In my experience, though I have owned several big metric and SAE sets of sockets and wrenches, I only have used a few. For metrics, the 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 19 and 22. For SAE, 1/4, 5/16, 3/8, 1/2, 9/16, 5/8, 3/4, 13/16, 7/8 and 1. For most purposes, the 13 and 1/2 and the 14 and 9/16 are interchangeable.

With drill bits, primarily 1/8, 1/4, 3/8, 1/2 and 1 are most useful.

I would have been better off buying multiple 10 mm wrenches and sockets because I use them and lose them. I also consume lots of 1/8 drill bits.

Good quality adjustable wrenches can handle larger sizes of nuts.

I have lots of sets for which many pieces are never used. It seems economical to buy a new set, rather than replacing the individual components, compounding the accumulation problem.

A good quality egg-beater drill and a brace and bit are great for a lot of household repairs and small woodworking projects. They are cordless, don’t require batteries, and easy to handle.
 

Toto'sDad

Tele Axpert
Ad Free Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2011
Posts
56,724
Location
Bakersfield
When I wrote my post about being disenchanted with mechanic work, I remembered back to a time when I had Fifteen (15) British Ford diesel engines torn down. They were being shipped to our NH dealership because no one would work on them. Why? Because the British in those day didn't throw ANYTHING away! (Late 1960s) I had engines with over sized, and under sized crank shaft bores. Crankshafts that were both over and undersized, that had been metal sprayed and reground. I had oversized and undersized pistons and liners. Same with the camshafts both bearings, and line bore. I had to keep a clipboard on each engine, in order to match up parts when I reassembled them. ALL of the ones I rebuilt continued to run for several years, but it was a nightmare job.

During this time period I also completely rebuilt a late model modal 1850 Oliver tractor that the owner's ranch hands had disassembled the transmission, powershift, clutch assembly and engine out at his farm. I had to go out and sweep up parts off a dirt floor shop to put it back together.

When I finally got done with professional mechanic work I was rebuilding a transmission in a John Deere tractor in July down in a carrot field outside Lamont California. When I wrapped the job, and the day up, I decided I was never going to work as a professional mechanic again, and I never did.
 

Fiesta Red

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Nov 15, 2010
Posts
8,867
Location
Texas
With most purchases, I have a 30/60/90 policy.

I wait 30 days and re-assess.
Then I wait 30 more days, reassess and start saving.
Then I wait 30 more days and then decide if it was a passing fancy/impulse buy or an actual want.

I don’t really need anything else, so it’s all “want” and/or maintenance on what I have right now.
 

Happy Enchilada

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Mar 25, 2021
Posts
3,068
Location
God's Country
1.Become a procrastinator and say you’ll buy them tomorrow.

2. PRETEND that you bought them, like you’re waiting for Amazon to deliver them…and see if the urge passes.

^^^^Much wisdom here - especially #2. I do that all the time. I put something in my Amazon wish list, and then forget about it. It's the next best thing to actually buying it. And it costs nothing. And that way, if time goes by and I find I really need or want it badly, it's all there ready to be ordered. Sometimes the feeling I get from this is as exciting as actually spending the moola - and like a bad taco, it passes and I feel OK again without it. 🦬
 

Happy Enchilada

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Mar 25, 2021
Posts
3,068
Location
God's Country
I don’t really need anything else, so it’s all “want” and/or maintenance on what I have right now.
And remember, the more guitars you own, the more cases you have to humidify, the more strings you have to change, etc.
I have gone through decades with only one guitar - first with my Yamaha FG180 as a kid, then with my Guild J30 as a college kid and young adult, and following that as an adult with a double cut LP Standard. Having multiple guitars - and multiple Telecasters - is honestly something I picked up from this forum. I'm currently going through "detox" and "rehab" and thinning the herd I accumulated, and it feels great. Doubt I'll ever get down to just one electric and/or one acoustic, but I could see if I ended up in "assisted living," it'd be just me and my Guild D40, my wooden BFF.
1652469993431.png
And I could certainly live with that.
 

String Tree

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Dec 8, 2010
Posts
18,144
Location
Up North
Probably a foolish question. But I’ve recently noticed I have a bad habit of getting into something, while jumping head first into the deep end lol. I’ve played with pedals a bit in the past. I’ve had a few boards. But just recently said hey! Let me sell what I have and build a legit board and get to know it fully. Needless to say. I didn’t pace myself. I didn’t collect over time. I just went and got what I wanted. Most being 150-200 a piece. I build guitars here and there. Parts teles. But I can’t just pick up pieces as I go. I have to have it all then and there haha.

Anyway. I really noticed it moving into our house. I had a few tools (hammer, couple screwdrivers and pliers.) mainly for guitar stuff. And the few odds and ends. We lived in an apartment. Didn’t need much. That’s why I pay for maintenance right? Well my dad helped us move out. He asked for a channel lock plier, “I um.. don’t have one.” The look he gave me haha.

Anyway. Moved into our house May 1st. I as of now have most tools I’d need (minus the specialty stuff) and a recent restraining order from lowes, put in place by my wife 🤣. Unless she’s with me. Now we have the money per say. We both do very well with our jobs and she’s definitely CFO (I think I saw this from @Jakedog. “Chief financial officer”). Anyway. So I don’t ever put us in a bind. But know it would be better to build up. Rather than spree it all.

But on the bright side. I like my setup 🤣
I remember when I bought my first Skill Saw.
I was pretty upset when I found out it didn't come with any Skill.
NOPE!!!
 

Kandinskyesque

Tele-Holic
Joined
Dec 6, 2021
Posts
885
Location
Scotland
Generally I find wearing boxing gloves is an effective remedy for impulsive thoughts.
It's very difficult to put one's hand in one's pocket while wearing a pair of 16 ouncers.
Marquis of Queensberry rules of course!!!
 

getbent

Telefied
Gold Supporter
Joined
Mar 2, 2006
Posts
47,712
Location
San Benito County, California
Something funny there is realizing scale makes bicycle projects more manageable than stuff with engines and 100% more wheels. It burns off a beer a little better. I can't hang autos or pickups in the garage. This week my wife said I'm cute when I project and I thought she'd think differently if I was standing at an engine stand in the driveway.

:)
for me, it isn't money, it is time. I can't have a jalopy hanging around. Bad for my vibe! makes me mad at myself. I have about 4 projects ahead of it and Ima get them done... then, I'll buy what I think I want and order all the stuff and blast away on it. Just not quite there yet.
 

Nightclub Dwight

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Aug 12, 2016
Posts
2,630
Location
Pittsburgh
When I finally got done with professional mechanic work I was rebuilding a transmission in a John Deere tractor in July down in a carrot field outside Lamont California. When I wrapped the job, and the day up, I decided I was never going to work as a professional mechanic again, and I never did.
I had to look up where Lamont is because I love geography. I should have known. Just north of Weedpatch on 184. I always learn something from TD's posts.
 

buster poser

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
May 1, 2018
Posts
6,295
Location
Tewa Land NM
Truthfully though, I don’t really work on stuff. I’m not handy and I have no desire to be. At all. I hate broken stuff, and I hate fixing it more. I grew up in a situation where money was scarce, and everything was crappy/cobbled together. Cars were always garbage, so you either learned to wrench, or you walked. It didn’t teach me to be thrifty, or resourceful, it forced me to be. I hated it. I always said that when I grew up I wasn’t fixing screwed up stuff anymore.

It was a huge day for me when I reached a point that I could pay a mechanic to fix my car and not mess with it myself. It was a huger day when I reached a point that when I’d had enough of the car misbehaving, I just went and bought a new one.

Now I have a guy for everything. I’ve got an army of guys. Plumbing? I’ve got a guy. Electric? I’ve got a guy. Carpentry? Drywall? Fence? Paint? I’ve got a guy for all that stuff. And I pay them happily, so that I can spend MY time doing things I actually enjoy.
Love all of this.

I can wrench a bit on cars, do some intermediate level Harry Homeowner stuff, but I want to tend to a garden over a house. My dad has long told me "every job, you gotta ask, do I want to learn how to do this over a span of days or weeks, or do I want it done in a matter of hours by someone who's done it hundreds of times?" He actually chooses the former quite a bit and always has.

Me? Later for that. Most stuff beyond component swapout or screwing something into a stud... I'm out, man. Tell me how much and if you guys need to hit the head or need some water or anything.
 

Midgetje94

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Jun 22, 2021
Posts
2,179
Age
29
Location
Texas
See I like to tinker. I like to fix things and work around the house. Lol. I was a big Lego kid growing up. I’m happy with my Pitmaster gig now. But wonder if I should move on. Not many retire from kitchen work lol. I’ve bounced the idea of auto mechanic trade school.

I get I’m still “young” I’ll be 30 in January. We are doing well financially now. But no retirement plan here, no 401K. Nothing other than personal saving for the future
 

wrathfuldeity

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Apr 25, 2011
Posts
1,942
Location
Turdcaster, WA
A cure for impulsiveness...you are 30...wait 30 years...the impulsive things will change from what's the latest tool, toy, tele to get to knowing and mapping out the nearest toliet/outhouse. Most days it just pays to stay at home and when the impulse hits...ya know where the head is.
 




New Posts

Top