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How do you work through the winter?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by lbridenstine, Dec 10, 2013.

  1. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    You're on the right track. Most of those type heaters have bi-metallic type thermostats that spark when they make or break the circuit, just like the spark plug in your car's engine, that ignites the gas vapors in the cylinder.

    An oil-filled radiator type heater with an electronic thermostat (non-sparking, but does such a thing exist?) would also have no exposed heating element, and might be a good choice, but again, most of the ones I've seen in that price and heat capacity range draw 1500 Watts, which at 120 Volts nominal, eats up 12,5 Amps of a typical 15 amp household circuit. Your garage may have a 20 A circuit, but that still leaves a very slim margin for running power tools, lights, etc.
     
  2. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    I had a large portable IR heater on a stand with wheels, which was designed for spot heating in commercial spraying/finishing situations. It draws 15 amps 110v. By itself it is not sufficient to heat my garage, and we don't get as cold here as you do in Michigan. Just my .02. IR will be OK if you work right in front of it, but I don't find it comfortable. I get too hot standing in front of it, and the rest of the space is cold. To heat a larger space, I think you would need a large 220v unit. I used it a lot the first winter I got it, and it nearly doubled my electricity bill. I gave it to my neighbor because I quit using it after that first winter.
     
  3. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Feets, don't fail me now!

    Yes, and sawdust, being an excellent insulator, makes your feet get warmer and warmer, and warmer. . . .:lol: Just kidding, in Rob's case, it would probably be stray coils of copper wire these days.


    I had the same experience in my basement--nothing like just having fed a board into your table saw when the whole place suddenly goes completely black, silent (except for the saw winding down), and cold, then trying to extract the board while keeping your fingers attached, and stumbling as best you can, through the basement junk to find the breaker panel.

    After a few years, I could finally afford it, and I over-reacted and put in an additional 220V and two 20-A, 120V branch circuits, and it sure is sweet. So glad I listened to my electrician and installed extra capacity when we built the house. Lights don't even dim any more when I switch on the big tools. :cool: But you really only need 2- 15 AMP 120 V circuits for a small, simple shop, one for the heater, one for the tools, and use either for the lighting.

     
  4. Bentley

    Bentley Friend of Leo's

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    -10 to maybe -15 Celcius.
     
  5. Shawn B

    Shawn B TDPRI Member

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    I work in my father-in-law's insulated shop (he has a ceiling-mounted space heater in one corner and a sealed oil space heater in the opposite corner... no spraying of any flammables when the open coil space heater is plugged in, so no spray finishes in the winter...). The floor of said shop is a concrete slab, and it sucks the heat out pretty quick. It was 7°F last Saturday with a wind chill of -13°. Ugh.

    Before that I used a sealed oil heater in my small insulated shop out back, and toughed it out in my uninsulated/unheated garage when using the planer or the bandsaw. I have also been known to do some work in my basement, or in the kitchen (I did some epoxy pore-filling in the kitchen last week... My wife was less than pleased, but that stuff needs a solid 70°F to cure properly and in a decent time).

    John - I've been following your work on the MIMF for the last 15 years or so, I'd guess. You, sir, are a miracle worker, your garage must be magic, producing all those beautiful instruments. I don't envy you that Canadian cold... It's bad enough here in Idaho. >.<
     
  6. Lunchie

    Lunchie Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm new to having projects but I do everything in the mudroom. Its not heated but we keep the door open to the kitchen because our washer and dryer is out there so if we didnt we would end up with frozen water lines.

    But since I havent touched any of my projects since about October, I dont think my post counts :D
     
  7. dazzaman

    dazzaman Tele-Afflicted

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    From the other side of the pond...
    At the moment I am lucky that much of my work gets done in a workshop at my workplace, but that will change next year. I also work out of a garage at home. I laid a new floor last year and the intention has been to properly insulate it, but I haven't got around to it yet, since there is no pressing need just at the moment. I have a space heater in there and an IR one. I turn the space heater on about an hour before I intend to start working. They are fine for keeping me warm if I am near them (but it isn't that cold here anyway, typically it will be in the 30s F).
    The bigger problem here for me is humidity which goes way,way up in winter to 80% or higher. I have the majority of wood stored in the garage, but if I am working on something I bring it into the house to acclimatise for a couple of months, and then take it out to work on it as needed.
     
  8. Barncaster

    Barncaster Doctor of Teleocity

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    Pine saw dust is excellent at masking all kinds of odors..............
     
  9. jkingma

    jkingma Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks, you're making me blush...

    :D
     
  10. Crafty Fox

    Crafty Fox Tele-Afflicted

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    I feel your pain Ron, I too once had to wear long pants; took me ages to find them amongst all the shorts and T shirts. Socks?
     
  11. funkymann1

    funkymann1 Tele-Holic

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    Just like Ron I live in SFlorida which is even hotter then were he is....my issue is right now is the BEST TIME to work!...in the spring summer & even some of the fall my garage gets way to hot!!! worst feeling in the world is cutting wood while your sweat is dripping down on it...I didnt marry a musician wife so since now is the time & I work for the school board so I have ample time off whenever I want...with that said there are some days I'll drive to dennys for breakfast & wait till she & the kids are gone, the go home & have 8 hours of bliss! jamming to good tunes while making sawdust...does it get any better???
     
  12. jstream

    jstream Tele-Holic

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  13. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

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    I saw those, but that's a bit more than I would want to spend. :-/ Looks like I'll probably just have to put up with the cold until I move out (assuming I find a place where I'll be able to work inside).
     
  14. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

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    Floor mats ordered. I went with amazon even though Harbor Freight has them for ridiculously cheap, because when my dad and I went to buy our workbench, HF's system got broken into and they stole my dad's credit card number. I'm sure it's fine now, but just in case...
     
  15. 6942

    6942 Poster Extraordinaire

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    For small jobs.....kitchen table.

    For big jobs........kitchen table.

    I'll cut wood or metal on my workbench, in my unheated garage.
    Then I'll bring the finished product inside, to my..............................
     
  16. Model T

    Model T Tele-Holic

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    The cold doesn't bother me, but the massive inside/outside/inside/outside temperature and humidity changes are really tough on the wood. My strategy for this winter will probably be to keep the wood inside until I need to do something, go out to the shed to do it, and then bring it back in.

    I have a small, well-sealed greenhouse that I built, and that I'm going to try to use for spraying lacquer. The inside is painted flat black, and between the passive solar effect and a small space heater, I can get it up to about 60°F even when it's single-digits outside. Unfortunately, it's way too small to do any woodworking.
     
  17. XxJoshxX

    XxJoshxX Tele-Holic

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    Too cold? Its too hot here.
     
  18. es125tcd

    es125tcd TDPRI Member

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    Live in east central ohio, heat a 26 by 40 2 story garage/family room / studio upstairs the old school way... airtight woodstove, lotsa red elm , locust and sugar maple... the wood stove was the first "major appliance" the wife and I purchased 32 years ago, and has proven to be the best investment we have ever made ( paid $ 348.00 + tax in 1980 for it.. only 5 moving parts , the only real expense is new stove gasket about every other year( $10.00) and keeping the flue clean... we have acess to 2 large and one small woodlot, and only cut up downed , or dead standing ( usually red elm, killed by the dutch elm blight years ago... some of these beasts are over 40" at the base, when they fall on hard frozen ground, it sounds like a broken bat single at jacobs field !!!) garage stays about 74 degrees down stairs , and 70 to 72 on the second floor... nice place to park the wifes suv and the plow truck in the winter...
     
  19. Omiewise65

    Omiewise65 Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Like this . :(
     

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  20. thecableguy

    thecableguy Friend of Leo's

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    I installed one of these in my garage:

    [​IMG]

    Just waiting on a part for the vent pipe and then I can fire it up. Haven't done anything out there since October when the weather went to hell.
     
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