How Distortion Works in Music

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by wyclif, May 20, 2020.

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  1. wyclif

    wyclif Tele-Afflicted

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    "In the digital world, distortion is commonly created using a technique called wave shaping, which is a cool concept that I thought deserved a blog post. You can use wave shaping to create a simple clipping distortion, but it can do a few more things as well."

    https://benmosheron.gitlab.io/blog/2020/04/26/distortion.html
     
  2. ricknbaker

    ricknbaker Tele-Afflicted

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    Hmmph.

    Get off of my lawn pesky kid.
     
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  3. fasteddie42

    fasteddie42 Tele-Afflicted

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    HURUMPH!!
     
  4. stormsedge

    stormsedge Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Very cool. Plainly a lot of thought and work...I check my laptops later to see if they will run the JavaScript since ole Mr. iPad won't.
     
  5. AxemanVR

    AxemanVR Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    `
    FYI...

    "Distortion" is a major factor even in the cleanest guitar tone. It's what gives a guitar its fat, round, smooth, sweetness.

    A guitar amp that is devoid of distortion would sound shrill and sterile.

    I once had a conversation with an engineer at a television studio and I was talking about a tube guitar amplifier and brought up "response" and "distortion". In his world these things mean something significantly different and he couldn't wrap his head around why you'd actually welcome distortion in an amplifier - because of course any amount of it in a signal being transmitted for TV is "bad".

    I had to clarify that I was talking about "player response" not "frequency response", and that the "euphonic distortion" I was discussing is wholly dis-similar to the "THD" or "Total Harmonic Distortion" that most sound design engineers try to keep as low as possible.

    I think I finally got through to him... although I still wouldn't want him designing a guitar amp for me... ;)



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    Last edited: May 20, 2020
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