Honk's General Observation #1, after nearly 20 years on the gear interwebs...

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by GeorgiaHonk, Jan 24, 2015.

  1. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I gigged for years with a Rockmaster preamp in my rack. Bought it new in the early nineties, and it has seen over 500 bar gigs and probably that many weekend jams as well. Still have it, and have never had any issues with it other than the shorting jacks for the effects loops getting dirty and cutting out (easily fixed with jumper cables). I also have the matching Classic 50/50 power amp that is about a year newer than the preamp, and it has been completely trouble free.
     
  2. Dan R

    Dan R Poster Extraordinaire

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    When I was a teenager, you owned a Peavey if you couldn't afford a Fender. Most of my friends had Peavey amps and a couple had the T-60 guitar too. Of course, I wanted anything but a Peavey. They were considered second rate products, and nobody gets excited about that. Nobody would buy a Peavey amp when they could own a Fender Deluxe Reverb, or the like. Nobody was ever in awe of a Peavey anything. Later on, Peavey started making better quality products, and I think they are pretty respectable. Nothing wrong with Peavey, but it was not top quality. Peavey's come a long since then though.
     
  3. Shane_B.

    Shane_B. Tele-Meister

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    The first amp that I ever owned was a Peavey Heritage VTX Series 2 x 12 combo. All tube, built in Phaser and Parametric EQ. It was, by far, without a doubt, the best sounding amp I ever played.

    The problem was, it was too heavy. I'm a big guy. I used to put our Peavey SP-5 monitors on the stands, way over my head, by myself, and I had trouble lifting that amp. And that's why I got rid of it and regretted it ever since. The weight is why you see a lot of them retrofitted with casters.

    I replaced the Heritage with a Peavey Classic Chorus 2 x 12 and regretted it from the first gig.

    Replaced it a year later with a Mesa Dual Rectifier Tremoverb 2 x 12 100w tube. Had it almost 20 years and never did like it but I made due because at the time, the next step up was much more expensive. I sold it a couple weeks ago and don't regret it or miss it one bit.

    I'm more than happy with my ART tube pre and tube comp now running in to Guitar Rig and out my Yamaha HS80's. I don't see myself ever buying another amp if I decide to play out again. I'll just use a laptop and run direct to the PA, or get one of those Kemper units.
     
  4. christhee68

    christhee68 Friend of Leo's

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    I'm new to bands and gigging and equipment and all that, but I had a friend in the 80's who played in bands and I remember him mocking someone's Peavey stuff once and for the longest time I thought their stuff was inferior.

    I've gotten advice on another thread suggesting the Peavey Classic 30, so I've been looking for deal on one lately.
     
  5. cyclopean

    cyclopean Friend of Leo's

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    The 5150 amps are pretty well respected for metal.
     
  6. Gnobuddy

    Gnobuddy Friend of Leo's

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    I don't currently own anything made by Peavey, but I would have no problem buying one of their products if it met a need I had.

    I bought one of their little mixers once...but returned it two days later because it had neither mute nor solo buttons, and at a live jam I found it extremely difficult to solve sudden issues ("My guitar isn't making a sound!") without them. Basically you had to turn every other volume knob to zero to trouble-shoot the problem input, which meant ruining the mix you had spent the previous 30 minutes fine-tuning.

    Dunno if it qualifies for your litmus test or not, but I do own a Nady product, an SPC-25 handheld vocal condenser mic. It costs half the price of the most popular handheld vocal mic, and sounds very clear, natural and neutral, meaning it has a wide and relatively flat frequency response.

    Link to the Nady mic: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/cond...pc-25-condenser-microphone?_requestid=1701296

    Personally I quite dislike the famous, class-leading handheld vocal mic, the Shure SM58, with it's thin bass, screechy midrange, and rolled-off high treble. The Nady (not exactly a revered brand these days, is it?) is in fact a huge improvement over the Shure as far as sound quality goes.

    I'm told the Shure SM58 is tough enough to hammer nails in with. Maybe that's actually the best use for one of those things. :p

    -Gnobuddy
     
  7. stnmtthw

    stnmtthw Friend of Leo's

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    I had an old 50 watt Bandit when I was first starting out, and I honestly never heard anything bad about it until that newfangled internet came along... I grew up on the poor side of town, too. Maybe that had something to do with it. Marshalls and Mesa-Boogies were the cool amps to have back then. Fenders were for the old guys.

    Nowadays, I would take any of those brands. I sound the same no matter what I'm playing through anyway.
     
  8. studio

    studio Poster Extraordinaire

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    Peavey Products are awesome!

    Behringer is awesome!

    Rolls is awesome!

    Samson is awesome!

    Seems like these days, thinning the herd
    is Vox products and Fender products taking
    on the same plastic example as all the other
    survival first manufacturers.

    Nobody has "raised the bar" in quite a while.

    Hughes and Ketner maybe?
     
  9. bun malaey

    bun malaey Tele-Afflicted

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    Peavey is

    Affordable

    Reliable

    Sound good

    Anyone who knocks Peavey, spends more time on the internet than they should.
     
    4 Cat Slim likes this.
  10. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    I like the way you think.
     
  11. soulman969

    soulman969 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Rather than be a copy cat I'll just affirm what Dan R posted as having been my experience over the years as well. Since Peavey gear first appeared I've played through many pieces of it but bought almost none. It was just not all that impressive to me.

    Since then I come to appreciate the fact that they're produced some very dependable "bullet proof" gear that while being unimaginative still sounded decent and got the job done. I have a feeling that's what Hartley Peavey was after from the get go and for the most part he succeeded.

    In the last year I bought and sold a Peavey guitar that I was actually very impressed with. The fact that I didn't "bond" with it though doesn't change the fact that it was a quality instrument that should have been worth far more in comparison to some others than it was.

    Over the years Peavey has definitely upped their game.
     
  12. Boomhauer

    Boomhauer Friend of Leo's

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    My very first guitar was (still is) a Peavey acoustic. When I picked up my part-time gig at the guitar shop a few years back, all the guys said things like "It's not even worth setting up; it's just a piece of junk." Then, when it did get a proper setup, they were all quite impressed with the sound and overall playability...Not bad at all for a sub-$500 acoustic. Actually, most of the guys I worked with in the shop preferred my Peavey to most of the Ibanez's that we sold.

    My first amp was also a Peavey. I keep thinking I need a new one, until I refer to Honk's General Obsevation #2, and realize that what I have is a made-in-the-USA (mine's old enough to still wear that badge), solid-state amp that's really damn good. It'll go from silky smooth to rough-n-ready, with a "feeling" that's been proven to mimic the tube "feel" in quite a few blind tests I've read.

    But yes, there is a bit of a nose turn-up whenever I tell someone about my Peavey gear.
     
    JGOCTO likes this.
  13. BobbyZ

    BobbyZ Doctor of Teleocity

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    When I started playing in a band in the early 80s I thought Peaveys were really good amps. Sure I had a white knob Princeton but that stupid thing wasn't loud enough.
    I did like the niehbor kids late silverface Pro Reverb but a second hand Peavey head and 4x12 cab just had to be better.
    And none of those stupid vacuum tubes!

    Played Peaveys through the 80s and my only new amp was a Classic Chorus 2x12.
    Then some guy told me I needed a real amp. That started me down the tube amp road about 90 91 or so.

    Didn't get on the intenet till whatever it says in the upper left corner of this window.
     
  14. JGOCTO

    JGOCTO TDPRI Member

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    I know this is an old post, but I just had to join in- a year or so later. LOL!!! I have had my Peavey Heritage VTX amp since 1983- when I was a young teen. She has been thru lots of rehearsals,gigs and recordings. I haven't played her in almost 20 yrs.I had been playing strictly Marshalls since the early 90's( JCM 800 and JCM 2000 DSL 100). She was stored away with all of her beer, wine and melted wax stains.

    I just recently- FINALLY-had her tuned up and she sounds AMAZING! All original except for the Power Tubes. I'm now just getting re-aquainted with her tones. I am very surprised in what I am hearing out of her. I'm not familiar with the new Peavey amps, although I am interested in the Valveking for it's variation.

    One silly thing, I feel about the line is that the logo is waay too much of a High School design. I believe Mr.Peavey designed the logo in H.S. and unfortunately it looks like it as well. I bet, if you were to take the logo off and place the Peavey next to another amp(one that is considered a decent amp now), and do a blind ear test, you would get a big surprise. I never liked the lightning logo, I think it's waaay to cheesy and it degrades the viewers perception of a decent amp. But, they really were made like tanks back then. So, here's my late(year later response). Have a Great year- or half a year! LOL!
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2016
  15. wayloncash

    wayloncash Tele-Afflicted

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    My practice amp is peavey out of the pawn shop. Got it for 50 bucks. I won't complain its not my first choice, but its fun to mess with all the effects. The British amp( usually considered Vox) is what helped me decide what real amp I wanted.
    Doesn't seem to be many starving artist type musicians here. I'm poor so I take what I can get.
     
  16. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    :):):)
     
  17. 4 Cat Slim

    4 Cat Slim Friend of Leo's

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    Years ago, friend of mine stored his Peavey Foundation Bass at my apartment for several months.
    I didn't play much bass the and I still don't, but it was a good playing and well-made instrument as I recall.

    I draw a comparison to beers, Peavey being probably most like Budweiser is to beer snobs. There are better choices, but there are also many more worse choices.
     
    Stingfan73 likes this.
  18. String Tree

    String Tree Doctor of Teleocity

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    Sorry, I have to start with Fender Tube Amps as my Benchmark.
    IMHO - Peavey never came close save for a handful of Amps.
    Many people made good music with them and that's fine with me.

    Good Bass and PA gear. Those first CS-800 rack-mounted Power Heads could really take a beating.
     
  19. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    true that it's a way to ferret out cork sniffers, but I don't like the whole working stiffs vs patrician wannabes setup

    what happened to supporting the little guy? a boutique is a bodega...
     
  20. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I love my Delta Blues 210. I also have a Fender Blues Jr., and even though you can't really compare such different amps, I prefer the Peavey. However, a friend of mine has an old Mesa Boogie Mk III that I would take in a second if he offered it.
     
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