Homemade cab for new 5e3 build

Discussion in 'Shock Brother's DIY Amps' started by TonyOz, May 12, 2021.

  1. TonyOz

    TonyOz TDPRI Member

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    I've posted variously about my 5e3, a big shout out to everyone who helped when I was in strife. All seems to work now, the first gig with it is next week. Can't wait.

    Part of the DIY vibe was building my own cabinet, more or less to the original 5e3 dimensions. I'm a measure once cut twice sort of woodworker, but with considerable assistance from various power tools I got the job done.

    Covering the cabinet with tweed was beyond me. A clear finish on the new pine planks would have highlighted my wood working skills, so I opted for blackboard paint. This is designed to display whatever lands on it (including chalk), so it has a worn look from day one. I don't mind this. I put an aluminium sheet on the back cover to shield the chassis, an idea copied from my '81 Fender Champ.

    The pics below show the story. The bug has bitten, I've ordered the parts for a RobRob Champ micro. I will have a use for this, I play on the streets a lot, so a Champ which draws minimal power will be a welcome addition to my setup.

    Raw 1.jpg

    Raw II.jpg

    Back.jpg

    Finished front.jpg

    Finished back.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2021
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  2. SerpentRuss

    SerpentRuss Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

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    Looks good, I like the finish. I'm going to guess you don't own an oscillating spindle sander. If you don't, you should. There are lots of curves to sand smooth on an Amp cabinet. I purchased a cheap benchtop unit about 20 years ago and it's one of the most used woodworking tools in my shop.
     
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  3. Ess Eff

    Ess Eff Tele-Afflicted

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    Is that another name for a router?
    .
     
  4. Preacher

    Preacher Friend of Leo's

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    Great job. I can tell that you haven't worked with wood a ton, but guess what? It will get better. Each project you do will increase your skill set and as you get new tools you will see stuff get better.

    Suggestion, Tweed is a little rough, but you can also do an upholstered finish which might be a little easier starting out. Enjoy!!
     
  5. Preacher

    Preacher Friend of Leo's

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    nope, he is talking about a OSS, an Oscillating Spindle Sander.

    [​IMG]

    It will allow you to have a number of different sanding spindles to sand those curves and such. I use mine so much now that I don't use my router body pattern jigs on my guitar bodies. I just stand to the line with the sander now.
     
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  6. Preacher

    Preacher Friend of Leo's

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    One suggestion if you haven't already done it.

    Put a block in the top area if you can at the joint for the top and the sides to re-enforce that joint. There will be a lot of weight hanging on those four screws.
     
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  7. Ess Eff

    Ess Eff Tele-Afflicted

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    Haha..... I was being facetious.

    A router is the right tool for that job!
    .
     
  8. jondanger

    jondanger Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Looks like it is going to get the job done, and you can write your set list on it!

    @Preacher ’s suggestion is a good one. Is it glued and screwed, or just screwed? The chassis is hanging off the top board, so that’s most of the weight. That P12N weighs a little over 6 pounds? You probably have 3-5 pounds hanging off each of those screws if there’s no glue in the joint. I would either reinforce with a small cleat in the upper inside corners, or if possible, pull the top screws, brush some Titebond in there and screw them back in. I think you can get away with letting the screws hold it together to set and skip clamps.
     
  9. TonyOz

    TonyOz TDPRI Member

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    Thank for the feedback. The sanding machine looks great, maybe I should get one.. The cabinet is glued and screwed.

    Actually the top panel sits on top of the side panels, the screws face downwards. So the side panels take the weight of the chassis. rather than the screws. As per the pic below.

    To hold the chassis, I used the thickest bolts I could find which still fit the chassis holes. I also used fat countersunk washers to spread the load of the chassis bolts on the top panel. There was an odd buzzing noise when I first played the amp, turned out to be the back panel rattling against the chassis. A self tapping metal screw into the chassis secured the panel and removed the buzz, as per the 2nd pic below.

    Top detail.jpg

    Bolts.jpg
     
  10. Musekatcher

    Musekatcher Friend of Leo's

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    You aren't kidding. Gotta be the most useful fixed tool in a woodworking shop, and so few folks know about them. They are, magic.
     
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  11. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    That came out great! The blackboard paint reminds me of the look that some of the cheap Valco/Silvertone amps had, even when they were new. Nice vintagey vibe on that cab.

    If you like the look of Tolex (vinyl covering) but the thought of doing it strikes fear in your heart, use spray-on truck bed coating. It looks and feels like perfect, seamless Tolex.

    Carefully fill all dings and cracks in the surface and sand everything smooth before you shoot it on. Use several really light coats for the best result. It looks really good on amp and speaker cabs; it's really tough stuff and easy to repair if it takes a hard hit (fill dent, sand flat, shoot a coat over the repair).

    This is the stuff I use.

    [​IMG]

    Example:

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. jondanger

    jondanger Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I assume that @Preacher was talking about weight distribution when the amp is being carried by the handle, as was I. If it’s not traveling very often, and the cab is screwed and glued, I think you’re probably okay but a butt joint is the most susceptible to stress. Next time you have the chassis out, you may as well cleat the upper corners.

    Once again, very cool cab!
     
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  13. Preacher

    Preacher Friend of Leo's

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    Correct, if you are not going to put a handle on that amp you are good to go like you have it. But if you do decide to put a handle on it you might beef up the inside of that top joint with a small cleat and some glue and screws. Realistically a small 1/2" x 1/2" cleat glued into the corner will give you 1" of glue joint coverage.
     
  14. TonyOz

    TonyOz TDPRI Member

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    Sounds like an easy fix. I'll do it.
     
  15. TonyOz

    TonyOz TDPRI Member

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    The truck spray looks like my kind of stuff. I'll look it up.

     
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  16. Nickfl

    Nickfl Friend of Leo's

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    A router is the right tool for rounding over, the spindle sander is the right tool for refining the curves on things like the radius on the chassis cutout and the rear panels. Also great for template making.
     
  17. NoTeleBob

    NoTeleBob Tele-Afflicted

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    Nice job.

    Tweed is hard. Tolex, OTOH, is just seriously challenging.

    A drum sanding spindle in a drill press is another way to work the curves. Router, of course, for round over. OR old school with a rounding plane. Or old school inexpensive with a wood file and some time. A Sureform tool can cut out much of the rough in time.
     
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