Home Repair Woes

Telekarster

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If it were my home, the first thing I'd do would be to make sure that proper grade, gutters, etc. are all in working order and taking water away from my home. I would then start tackling anything structural, especially termite and critter damage. I'd be getting an exterminator out there STAT and rectify that situation, and then start repairing anything they've damaged. I'm a big fan of using treated wood, even if it's not going to be exposed to the outdoors i.e. if I have to replace a few 2x4's, 2x8's, plywood subfloor, etc. I spend the extra $ and use treated. I'd get with a brick mason and find out what the best way would be to shore up that brick. You might find that it's not as bad as it appears i.e. might only need a little XYZ to get that fixed.

Once everything is structurally sound again, I'd tackle the other stuff and/or do those things in tandem with the structural work if that's possible. FWIW I replaced my hot water tank a few years ago. The tank was about 400 and the plumber installed it along with a new water softener that I had purchased at the same time, and it was about 300 total. Not bad in my book vs. me doing it myself (which I could've but frankly I didn't feel like it LOL!). Most big box stores will not only sell you a new tank but will also line you up for install too, if you so desire, so that might be helpful in your situation. Good luck to you man, and hope everything works out for you!
 

teleman1

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I think your lowest priority is your water heater. Is it leaking anywhere, pressure relief valve OK. It is clanking cause no one ever drain it and the sediment is now above the drain ****. But, I question anything of issue with the clanging other than it is heat bubbling through sediment. The clanging in the walls is a noise level inconvenience. BUT, you could get one of those ex-ray things on your phone and look in the way where you hear the Nosie.. You need to see if there is equity in your home where you can do a refinance adding on another $30,000. Or some equity line. You have to do this work to the home and heir a good engineer contactor. You could leave the house and screw up your credit and have a host of a new can of worms. I'm just shootin ideas from the top of my head. Have you check what your home owners insurance covers?????
 

teleman1

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And this my seem crazy, but with all the demo work, it may be a thought to do small upgrades around what you are doing for repairs.<<maybe energy saving stuff/improvement. Again call your insurance agent. And look for those containers to hold your belonging's.
 

ReverendRevolver

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I'd move.

Plumbers aren't cheap, but those pipes are a problem. Spent more than I should have to get my main cast iron drain pipe worked on so the washing machine didn't shoot water all over.

Given all of what you've mentioned, several of these problems were apparent before you bought the place and withheld. I'd worry you have an uneven foundation due to what's under the house.

If you can't move, divide problems by priority and go from there. Even dividing the plumbing work up into sections to determine what's failing the pressure test might alleviate some of the cost of that.

I feel for you, I think most people who own a home have many things they try to pace around thier budget before fixing.

Water heaters are possible to do yourself, especially electric ones. Hardest part is getting the old one out.

I'd avoid anything caused by foundation or plumbing before fixing the root cause, and make sure water is set up to go away from your foundation. Gutter and downspouts are cheaper than plumbing or foundation work.

But that's alot of problems. Moving may cheaper and equal or less stress.
 

Milspec

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See, another person who like to punch Bob Villa in the face for encouraging the purchase of old homes.

First off, don't get overwhelmed, it is all part of home ownership and you have time...there is a reason a mortgage is a lengthy time period as it takes that long just to get things fixed up to the point of selling it.

The key is to remember that the only way to eat an elephant is with small bites and that is what you have in front of you...an elephant. Identify what you can fix quickly yourself and start with those items. Let the process snow ball to the more major things so you can reduce the list and reduce anxiety. You will get there, just take a lot of small bites.

I purchased a house built in 1860 by the railroad as living quarters for station manager. They over-built the place using redwood timber for the structure, but every repair was a fight due to non-standard dimensions. I have been at it for 17 years and it still needs the kitchen re-done and the hardwood floors restored, but that is too expensive right now. I just enjoy that the roof doesn't leak in the rain, the heater works in the winter, and the A/C is good in the Summer. Everything else is just showing off.
 

Milspec

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I love this. I love old homes built in that era especially! ;)
I did at first as well, but time was worn me down a little on the subject. It is crazy finding what wood they used for this place though, pretty much what-ever came off the rail cars. It served as many things over the years and is the 2nd oldest building in a town that didn't exist for another decade.

Best part is that it supplied the wood for my pine telecaster build...didn't want to let old timber go to waste.
 




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