Hollow body LP? Solid Body LP? Dunno, both I guess

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Muzikp, Apr 15, 2015.

  1. nickhofen

    nickhofen Friend of Leo's

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    Nice to see the man work in his man cave.:D
     
  2. thecableguy

    thecableguy Friend of Leo's

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    Fantastic work James, as usual!
     
  3. oldrebel

    oldrebel Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    That is great James. Is that water you are spraying on it? You seem to have a way of making everything look easier than it really is. Another great job!!
     
  4. Muzikp

    Muzikp Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks Mac. Yep I think I will glue in a block in the horn. I'll wait to see how tight the kerfing will go first. I'm going to my good friend who is proper luthier to use his resaw saw this weekend. I think I can cut the veneers for molding the top on it, it's a really nice saw.

    Lol yes the pipe is waaaayyyy too high. The height was mostly driven by the angle I put the torch at. I hadn't anticipated it ending up that high. I think I will take the 3/4" vertical piece out and just go mostly straight out of the torch to the 1/2" piece. That will reduce the height some although it's still too high.

    I have to say it was pretty simple. It was actually kinda fun once I was done practicing.

    Thanks guys. Good times for sure.

    Yep it is water. Without the water the wood doesn't relax the same. Plus it keeps it from burning the wood. I was happy I had no black burn marks inside the horn. Like I said, it is easy. Everyone should try it once. Makes me realize all these acoustic builders aren't full of magic and wizardry :D.
     
  5. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Mac, that's exactly what I thought. Like a master class from a Master who's done thousands of these things! :D

    Something that struck me, too. Don't know if was accidental or well-founded and thought out engineering, but that rig looks to be at perfect height to have a perfect view of the bend, watch for and correct twisting, and achieving excellent precision.

    Great video, James!

    EDIT: we were typing at the same time, but so much for good engineering:D I still like it being up near eye level so you can really see what's happrning!
     
  6. Muzikp

    Muzikp Friend of Leo's

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    Center block is in. I didn't really document the process, it's just a long block glued at the ends :neutral:

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Muzikp

    Muzikp Friend of Leo's

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    Lol, no it's too high. But now that you mention it, twisting is a big deal. I realized early on that I had to be very careful not to twist the side and get it all wonky. That would be really easy to do if you weren't paying attention.
     
  8. barbrainy

    barbrainy RIP

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    He really does. Between this and Rick's 335/Casino build, it makes me think the following things, usually almost simultaneously:


    • hey, I could do that!
    • hey, I could really mess that up!
     
  9. macaroonie

    macaroonie Friend of Leo's

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    The mystery of the little brown block

    Capture.JPG
     
  10. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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  11. Muzikp

    Muzikp Friend of Leo's

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    It bugs me that I don't know why there is a little piece of mahogany like that on the 335's. So I basically did it just because that's how the 335's are done. I still think it's odd to have an end grain to end grain glue joint. I all the sudden just realized that doesn't have to be end grain to end grain... hmmmmm.
     
  12. macaroonie

    macaroonie Friend of Leo's

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    Brown block.JPG


    How wide is your centre beam James ? Do you have enough there to allow for bridge mounting posts ?
    Looks kinda narrow to this spectator 6000 miles away.
     
  13. Muzikp

    Muzikp Friend of Leo's

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    No it's not wide enough, I'm planning on gluing blocks on for those. I wanted a narrow center block so I could do all the wiring through the pickup holes. Hoping to not have holes in the back.
     
  14. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire

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    You said not to watch it, so of course I watched it :rolleyes:.

    I'm thoroughly impressed, James. I'm really enjoying this build.
     
  15. twocup

    twocup Tele-Meister

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    James, great job on the sides and the video! Yeah, I think the "little brown block" is long grain for gluing the sides and attaching the strap pin, but I'm sure it will be fine. Nice work.
    Tim
     
  16. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I've seen some pictures of 335's with their guts open, and it seems like the end blocks are not end to end with the center block. I always just assumed it was mahogany because . . . well, I don't know why, but maybe it's easier to shape for end block purposes, and glueing to the center block. I'll have to go dig up some pictures of 335 interiors and check to see if those are as I recall them. Sandwiched in between the top and bottom, I doubt it's going to be stressed enough to cause any problems.

    Great build, James, as always, a tutorial in good work!
     
  17. oldrebel

    oldrebel Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Wow, looking good James. Great job!!
     
  18. Muzikp

    Muzikp Friend of Leo's

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    Made a little jig to help make kerfing. It's functional not a work of art.

    [​IMG]

    Basically the block with the dangerous razor blade attahed slides back and forth on bearings inside the two outer blocks. Clamp the contraption for desired depth to the bandsaw table and start cutting. That's a piece of sacrificial maple for testing my contraption.

    Actually before you can start cutting you need to mark some slots so you can cut them until the first slot reaches the razor blade.

    [​IMG]

    And before I did that I ripped an old piece of mahogany into 1/4" boards.

    [​IMG]

    And it turned out like so

    [​IMG]

    I'll rip that into 1/4" strips and then figure out how to get a 45 degree side on them :confused:.
     
  19. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire

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    Love it. We guitar builders are such an industrious, resourceful lot, yes? :D
     
  20. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Great jig, James. looks like a hybrid of Davecam's and what I remember of Rich Rice's--and looks like it works well.


    45 degree angle--veeery carefully! My first inclination would be to try and rip it through the table saw with blade at 45 degrees, but that might just rip the little blocks right off the kerf strip. If your bandsaw cuts straight, and the table can tilt 45 degrees (mine won't do either), it might work. Alternate 45 degree and 90 degree cuts to maximize your kerfed wood.

    You and Rick are really getting a lot of us fantasizing about bending wood, making kerfs, and other harder-than-it-looks guitar build stuff. :D !
     
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