Hit a road block in guitar

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by Tazz3, Dec 14, 2014.

  1. Flat6Driver

    Flat6Driver Friend of Leo's

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    Oh. I agree, I was sort of referring back to my other thread.
    Also, I used to see stuff like that written in tab on the web all the time and couldn't make any sense of it since I could think of how I was supposed to finger that. When I realized it was just like a Dm7 it all clicked.

    So my point was that there's so much on the web, it's far better to see/hear something and then you realize how it's not to mysterious and confusing.
     
  2. Tazz3

    Tazz3 Friend of Leo's

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    I do scales s the minor pentatonic in A,I start off with them to warm up.i have to soak all this in lol.i will let the hang of it in a year I will be laughing at my self I hope lol.
     
  3. mikhett

    mikhett TDPRI Member

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    I like justins begginer course

    Also.Im self taught but decided to go back to begginers course and ive learned a lot.I also paid 19.00 for a one month Jamplay course. There is A LOT OF INFO to ingest from Jamplay!
     
  4. Brett Fuzz

    Brett Fuzz Tele-Holic

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    I find if I take a break from guitar, even sometimes as long as 2 weeks, When I come back I find myself playing better than the day I put it down.

    Weird how that works.:confused:
     
  5. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    Here's my thinking on this. Much of what I do throughout the day is similar to what I did the day before. On the guitar, this can be manifested in the way my hands move in little cliches. When I play a descending run, I might end it by jumping up a major 6th for the last note. Without thinking about it, little moves like this can populate my playing, with the result that I seem to get in a rut. By taking time off, I think that such little finger cliches or stylistic fads that I had been doing sort of fly away, because they weren't substantial. They were more like little nervous tics. What remains is the deep structure of my knowledge, ear, technique, and mature stylistic traits.

    One solution, for me, is to play along with a YouTube live performance of a blues artist or band. I allow myself to copy the guitarist. After the clip ends, I sound like I have a greater range of expressivity, because I have found alternatives to the micro-fads that populated my playing.
     
  6. Tazz3

    Tazz3 Friend of Leo's

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    I belive this sometimes I don't play for 2 days I think iam better
     
  7. Gnobuddy

    Gnobuddy Friend of Leo's

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    Most of our thinking happens below the level of consciousness. It's amazing how much stuff happens when you don't know you're thinking. In college, when I had to study something really difficult, I would read it through before I went to bed totally confused. Quite often it would be crystal clear when I woke up the next morning.

    Nowadays if I notice myself getting into a rut in my guitar playing, I might switch to messing around with keyboards for a while, or a bass guitar, or even a very different type of guitar - say, switch to a nylon-string classical guitar, or an electric guitar if I've been playing acoustic a lot.

    I have absolutely no skill whatsoever on keyboards or bass, but often when I go back to my guitar after one of these little sabbaticals, I'll be playing a little better, not quite so stuck in my previous rut.

    That's the funny thing about the subconscious. It's very powerful and can do things your conscious mind can't. At the same time, it's a little bit silly, and so you can sometimes use your conscious mind to trick your unconscious into doing something for you! :)

    -Gnobuddy
     
  8. MilwMark

    MilwMark Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Took a few months of lessons from a great, practical teacher. I knew some basics by then (open chords, barre chords, alternate picking). Spent most of that time on the triads. What a tool. Teaches you how chords work in a key. Teaches you to see things all over the neck. Teaches you that in a band, a three note chord often "fits" better than a 5-6 note chord, especially if you have multiple guitars. Teaches you how to solo musically (rather than a scale pattern - not to say those can't be musical, but it can be tricky to make them musical instead of "scalish"). Such a great tool.

    And Chuck Berry is kind of the same thing - maybe he's using 4 note voices (?) but a lot of it is really just triad-like chord shapes, with the same shape serving as rhythm and lead with a few extended notes added in. And the rhythm. Don't get me started.

    With the triads and a couple Chuck Berry tunes, a guitar player can conquer the world!
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2015
  9. MDMachiavelli

    MDMachiavelli Tele-Afflicted

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    You tube is great place to learn, unfortunately it wasn't available for me in the early 80s. That being said, I've reach numerous plateus in my playing. The first rut I hit was basically the same as yours and what I did was start playing with people around my community who were better than me. It kind of like running track, you always get better and your time improves when you run with someone that is faster than you.

    But every time I get in a rut I change things up. I jam with different people, and most of all no matter how long I've been playing I'm not ashamed to say that I'll take a guitar lesson.

    Once I do something to get me out of that rut, I'm amazed at the progess I make and also the speed at which I make it.
     
  10. Journeyman22

    Journeyman22 Tele-Meister

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    I accidentally found "My Twangy Guitar" one day on YouTube. I kind of liked this guy's style in presenting his lessons. So I ordered a DVD for Rockabilly Rhythm lessons. I figured it will just wind up being a waste of time. Well 3 months later, I have gone from 1/2 to 1 hr. a day practice to 4+ hours a day (yes, retirement is wonderful). It's amazing how one mans way of teaching can hit home with certain people. I just sort of took off. I figure I will have this lesson nailed in 6 months or so. I will then order the Rockabilly Lead guitar DVD.
    So, what I am saying is just keep searching, something will turn up that will unlock your enthusiasm, and you too can take off and never look back. "Necessity is the mother of invention" Good Luck! Just my 2 cents.
     
  11. Tazz3

    Tazz3 Friend of Leo's

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    Hi all i have not given up yet, aim still practiceing every day,
    But I realize I will never be good lol. But I have to start geting more in to it.
    I might go take lessons but iam not sure yet.
     
  12. Lunchie

    Lunchie Poster Extraordinaire

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    You will always be better then some and worse then others. I was at the ma and pa shop today putting a Am Standard Tele on layaway. I sat down and plugged it into a '68 DRRI and started playing around. There was some dude that sat down and was listening to me play. My initial thought was he had a death wish but I guess he must of been enjoying it. Well another dude sat down 10 feet away from me and plugged a strat into a Bassman RI and started cranking out Sultans of Swing. The guy quickly got up and went over and to him. So I guess I was good enough until a real player came along :lol::D.

    If you are constantly comparing yourself to your idols, your always going to be greatly disappointed in your playing. The trick is to play what you like and not give a hoot as to what others think. Just do it at respectable volumes in public :D.

    Usually all you have to do is spend 10 minutes at your local GC and you will find someone your better then. :cool:
     
  13. Journeyman22

    Journeyman22 Tele-Meister

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    Bulldust! Practice, will turn you into a very good guitar player. It just doesn't happen fast for most of us. If it was easy, everyone would be grand master guitar players. All it takes is a lot of practice. Try to find songs and lessons that are "fun" for you. In a year or two down the road, you will be so happy you stuck with the guitar. It will sooth your soul, and give you calm, cool, confidence. Trust me on this one. I felt the same way when I first started out. Keep on rockin', Buddy.
     
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