Hey there, English folk

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by AndyLowry, Feb 10, 2013.

  1. jefrs

    jefrs Doctor of Teleocity

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    Chard is of course the birthplace of powered flight where John Stringfellow demonstrated his steam powered aeroplane in 1848.
    Not many people know that.
     
  2. Tony474

    Tony474 Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    I think you meant a queue of other drivers...

    You're dead right about driving in the USA, at least on the Interstates but also on many other roads. I love the drive from Atlanta to Nashville and on to Memphis, especially the part over the Cumberland Plateau.

    But then I grew up in Central London and learned to drive there. If you can handle that most other places are a piece of cake. In fact it used to be the case, IMO, that if you can cope with Hyde Park Corner you'll be OK anywhere. Now they've gone and spoilt it by installing traffic lights... I've only driven in two big(gish) cities in the USA, Houston and Phoenix, but they're a breeze compared with London. I've also driven in Prescott (nice town)...

    Thing about London most of the time is that the majority of drivers there seem to know what they're doing and don't faff about. It's easy to spot the "outsiders" who are the timid, hesitant, over-cautious ones who hold everything up while they waste time, struggling to cope. It's actually worse out of business hours and at weekends, though at least (or maybe because) the £10 daily "Congestion Charge" doesn't apply then.

    Mind you, from what I've heard, I'd much rather drive in London than, for example, Istanbul or Delhi. However, Andy wasn't asking about them.
     
  3. GigsbyBoyUK

    GigsbyBoyUK Friend of Leo's

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    With five days in the UK and starting in London I would save Kendal and the Lakes for another time. November will almost certainly be wet and cold and if all you do is wander around town you are missing the whole point of going to the Lakes: getting out on a good long walk. Kendal itself doesn't have much to offer unless it's a base for hill walking.

    My vote would be a day at the British museum, a day exploring some of London's other sights and a couple of day trips by train to some lovely small cities or towns from this list:
    Cambridge - be sure to do 'the backs' walk to see the various colleges as just idly walking around town keeps the best bits hidden.
    York - ideally do an overnight stay there too. See York Minster (cathedral) and explore this lovely city. Try to go on a night when there's a folk club or open mic to visit. The locals are very friendly.
    Canterbury - another smallish city with a cathedral and lots of history.
    Bath - again this might benefit from an overnight stay. Lovely place to wander around and the Roman Baths to visit.

    By the way, what sort of music do you especially like? There are some good places where you are guaranteed an enjoyable night in London, if you like certain types of music. I can especially recommend a place for blues and a place for Gypsy Jazz if you like either of those.
     
  4. Tony474

    Tony474 Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    By the way, the original idea of roundabouts was for vehicles to alternate, the one on the roundabout allowing another to enter in front, and the next approaching vehicle slotting in behind, so that the streams of traffic meshed like cogs in a gearbox and kept moving. As traffic volumes increased this became impractical and now we have the familiar situation where in general traffic on the roundabout has priority and often traffic lights are installed too, finally defeating the entire object of the original concept.

    As recently as the 1960s or even later the Highway Code said simply "There are no rights of way in general at roundabouts".

    Ever tried the "Magic Roundabout" at Hemel or similar ones elsewhere? Fun, fun, fun.
     
  5. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I find driving on UK roads is wonderful. People are so polite.

    Want loonie driving? Come here.
     
  6. Markdett

    Markdett Tele-Meister

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    The Tudor Village of Lavenham, near Ipswich, East of London. Cambridge, and the US Military Cemetery just out of town. Nottingham, particularly my favorite Pub when I was there, Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem. If you were ever a Scout, Brownsea Island.
     
  7. ScottieHotrod

    ScottieHotrod Tele-Holic

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    You find a lot of History and countryside in Kent. Especially Canterbury which is a beautiful old city with a very interesting past (Tomas Beckett, the Canterbury Tales, etc.)

    And it's all just 1:45 from Victoria.

    In London it really depends what you're into. There are so many great locations that cost absolutely nothing. Getting around on the tube is easy as anything but don't try to have a conversation with anyone. Just read the 'Metro' or stare into your phone like everyone else.

    Apparently that's an unwritten rule around here.
     
  8. The String King

    The String King Tele-Afflicted

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    If you are driving in the country, don't forget to give way to horses, ducks, sheep, cows, pigs, cyclists, geese, deer, fallen trees, potholes, overgrown hedges, badgers, abandoned ford escorts, fly tipped waste (mattresses, washing machines etc), caravans which can stop anywhere they like for an unlimited amount of time, and lunatic farmers in surprisingly fast tractors.

    Bring you wellys, try jellied eels and don't mention Iraq and you should be fine!!


    If you're around Sussex come to my local jam night, that could be a laugh! Have a good time.
     
  9. markbastable

    markbastable Tele-Meister

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    Everyone's going on about how you've picked a bad month for it. Well, it's a perfect month for the Tower of London, which is at its best on a gloomy and damp winter's day. In the chill, flat grey of a November afternoon the very stonework seems to sag under the centuries' weight of accumulated menace and hopeless despair.
     
  10. slauson slim

    slauson slim Friend of Leo's

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    If you are into history, +1 for the Military Cemetary, and also The Eagle Pub in Cambridge - with graffiti on the ceiling from WWII flyers. Both will move you. Cambridge is also wonderful to walk around and visit the public areas of the old colleges.

    London off-season, in winter is great. We went to Tower on a gloomy, cold, damp day, and it was near dark when we got out, with street lights refelcting off the heavy fog. I learnt what bone-chilling cold meant.
     
  11. jimd

    jimd Friend of Leo's

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    The Eagle is a great pub. The RAF bar with the flying theme is in the back (it is not readily apparent when you walk in). Watson and Crick who discovered DNA supposedly were regulars. Cambridge is full of history with many extraordinary people studying and teaching there. If you are there in the evening, attend the evensong in King's College Chapel (more like a cathedral). Get there early. We were in the back near the door and were constantly annoyed by the rude folks who would come in for 2 minutes look around and then leave. It's a church service for crying out loud.

    As far as the weather in November goes, it is not too bad (but keep in mind, I'm from Cleveland, not Arizona). I was just in London and Cambridge in December (but have been there at all times of the year). It was in the 30's which I think was a little colder than usual, and damp. I never bring a heavy coat. I dress in layers, so I am ready for anything and it is easier to pack. The top layer is usually a rain jacket, because it will rain and it breaks the wind. If it's cold, you have an excuse to stop in a pub to warm up.
     
  12. fuzzbender

    fuzzbender Former Member

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    just remembered,

    if you want an idea of the Lake District watch this tourist video



    contains strong language

     
  13. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    ^^^ November may not be the best time to go to the Lake District. When I was there I was surprised how small the lakes, or meres, or whatever they're called, were.
     
  14. Mid Life Crisis

    Mid Life Crisis Poster Extraordinaire

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    There not quite on the same scale as the Great Lakes, sure. :eek:
     
  15. The String King

    The String King Tele-Afflicted

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    That's not the Tower of London you've described. Sounds more like Gravesend.
     
  16. thinling

    thinling Tele-Meister

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    I would prefer going to the Lake District off-season, in the summer it get's crowded! I've stayed in Kendal in the fall, and I enjoyed walking in rain and in fog. You need boots you won't slip and slide in, I had to buy some there. Get a map and a compass, and plan your route the night before... aim to reach a pub at lunchtime, it's great to get in out of the rain, but don't drink so many beers you can't walk back, save that for the evening! I've met people there not taking it seriously and being totally lost and under-dressed for the cold. B&Bs are where I stayed, but an Inn might be good...
    I'm a Southerner though, London and Brighton are my 'hood!
     
  17. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    TO each his own. Sounds like you were an extra in Withnail and I.
     
  18. GigsbyBoyUK

    GigsbyBoyUK Friend of Leo's

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    An inn? There really hasn't been any inns in England for a century or more. We have pubs, hotels and B&Bs.
     
  19. sir humphrey

    sir humphrey Friend of Leo's

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    Yeah there has - an Inn is just a pub that does accommodation. Still plenty of those around!
     
  20. GigsbyBoyUK

    GigsbyBoyUK Friend of Leo's

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    Seriously, does anybody ever call them Inns? Sure, some pubs have inn in their name, but not all of them have accommodation. It's like a pub having tavern in its name - a leftover from when the word was in common usage, but in my 43 years I haver never heard anyone say inn or tavern.
     
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