Help With "All I Have To Do Is Dream"

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by hekawi, Aug 8, 2015.

  1. hekawi

    hekawi Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm fine with the chords to the Everly Brothers classic, but I need help with the 2nd guitar part...the electric is adding some neat little fills. clue me in please. thanks!

     
  2. jbmando

    jbmando Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    Use xx999 12 for the E, xx 11 9 10 9 for the A, xx 11 999 for the C#m, xx9897 for the G#m, xx7675 for the F#m, xx8675 for the F#, xx9877 for the B.

    Dream...(C#m A)

    I can make you mine = A G#m F#m B E

    Only trouble is= A G#m F# B

    If that don't help enough I can do a vid for ya.

    There's also an F#m7 or A6 in the verse: xx 14 14 14 14:

    When I want you (C#m A... E)

    When I want you (F#m7) and all your charms...
     
  3. hekawi

    hekawi Poster Extraordinaire

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    fantastic! thanks jbmando!
     
  4. bigfoist

    bigfoist TDPRI Member

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    random thread derailing time! i just happened to check this thread and i was pretty astounded by the fact that you worked out the exact chords rather than just the progression. so my question is: how did you learn to do this? i work on picking out various lines from songs i enjoy but picking out chords seems like magic to me at this point.

    i have heard of coordinating with the bass to figure out chords but this still leaves the question of figuring out which EXACT chords to play. obviously, i am sure the process (like everything else in guitar) is largely a ton of practice, but a bit of help to get on the path would be awesome!
     
  5. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    How to do what jbmando did?...ime, Learn scales in all of their patterns. That leads to knowing/seeing chords in various voicings. Learning how the chords are formed in various voicins and then listening to the song to hear the register in which the voices are being played is one key to finding what Jbmando shared with us, ime.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2015
  6. Jack S

    Jack S Friend of Leo's

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    This is exactly where ear training comes in. You need to learn to analyze a piece of music where you can pick out each instrument and its movement. The more you practice and analyze the easier it will become to find each note inherent to a chord shape. Learning to recognize the voicing of various chord shapes helps immensely in recognizing which shape is the underlying chord to a string of notes.

    What I stated above may sound like circular thinking, but it is actually two elements to work on simultaneously and they will start to gel over time.

    Also, I might add, a good player is always seeking economy of motion and smoothness of execution so if you figure out a section of music that is technically difficult because of the particular geometry, you are probably playing it in the wrong place on the neck. The original player probably found a simpler way of executing the passage.

    An example of this is the Elvis Presley song Too Much that has a crazy solo that Scotty Moore played on the record that I doubt he ever played a second time. I have heard an example of them playing it live and Scotty just leaves out the solo. I spent awhile figuring out that solo for a rockabilly band I was in and when I was struggling with it I found a tablature transcription of it online and tried to learn the transcription because I was still learning the notes and was trying to expedite the process.

    While the notes were correct, the physical layout was horrible and very difficult for me to pull off successfully. I struggled further until I decided there is no way Scotty played it like that. I looked for an alternate method, and suddenly it dawned on me how he played it. Once I found it, my solution was so much easier and I am sure that it is what Scotty played because everything lay comfortably under the fingers.
     
  7. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

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    You're probably right. Scotty was a fan of Chet Atkins' playing and Chet was all about economy of movement on the fret board.
     
  8. 13ontheB

    13ontheB Tele-Afflicted

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  9. jbmando

    jbmando Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    I simply listened to the video, KNOWING the song's chords, and I just plugged in the voicings I thought I heard to the changes. Look, recording artists don't deliberately do things the hard way. Usually, if something pretty simple sounds great, that is what will be on a pop record. All the electric did there was play the song's changes, with tremolo, in a higher register. Easy.

    Note: Actually, on closer listening, there are a couple of other changes they used in the song, just for variation, I guess. If you play the whole song like I posted it will sound great, but a couple times he went E xxx997 > A xxx9 10 9 after the first half of the second line, instead of C#m A; and for "All I have to do" it goes A (xxx9 10 9) > B (xxx877.)
     
  10. bigfoist

    bigfoist TDPRI Member

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    could you explain this a bit more? by each note inherent to a chord shape, do you mean the note that gives a given chords its distinctive color (e.g., the b7 on a 7th chord)?

    the way i understand this is this: you become familiar enough with chords to be able to hear one and distinguish its color notes, then have enough knowledge of the scale to pick out that note + the others in the chords.

    so if you were to hear a Gmaj7, you could hear it and recognize it as such, then use your scale knowledge to find G, B, D, and F# [or dropping one if you use a different voicing] and play it?

    lastly, what exactly is meant by 'register'? i have a vague idea of what the term means but not entirely.
     
  11. Mrbob135

    Mrbob135 Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Another way of saying register would be octave. Recognizing whether the Gmaj7 you mention is played in the 2nd fret with the major 7 on top, or in the 7th fret with the 3rd on top, or perhaps in the 10th fret with the 5th on top. That is what they mean when they talk about voicing and register...at least that is what I think they mean :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2015
  12. wenis

    wenis Tele-Meister

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    Speaking of Chet Atkins, I believe he played the fills for this Everly Brothers tune and many of their early hits.
     
  13. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    That is what I have read, wenis.
     
  14. DaveG

    DaveG Tele-Meister

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    Not to over-complicate this, or confuse our young friend but...

    Realize that Don Everly often (most of the time...) played his parts in an open tuning, usually G but sometimes D. So, that's "the sound" of a lot of these records. The intros to Bye Bye Love, Wake Up Little Suzy, etc. are open G. And thus his chord formations are gonna sound different from those on a regular tunes guitar (which, BTW, is what Phil was playing...)

    There are lot's of chord things and "transcriptions" for the Everly's tunes on the web, but I've never seen anybody do a comprehensive set of transcriptions that takes the open tunings into account. Hmm. sounds like an opportunity!

    And yes, it's Chet playing the little lead bits on a lot of the early stuff. Later it was Hank Garland.
     
  15. MilwMark

    MilwMark Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    QFT. This is gold.

    These guys had to play this stuff hundreds of times a year. As flawlessly as they could. Often while singing or at least "puttin on a show".

    Once you acquire a basic level of skill, if it seems crazy hard (aside from some very technical forms of music I guess) something's probably wrong.

    When a player unlocks this truth and figures out how to make it easy (hint: it's often not scale-based, but instead a partial chord shape - often a triad - tracking the changes, IME), everything just opened up.

    I wish someone had told me this when I started. But maybe I wouldn't have believed it or understood then anyway.

    *Edit - I don't read tab that well but I suspect the partial chord method is exactly how jbmando did it above.
     
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