1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Help thinning down headstock!?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by jtoul2, Jan 7, 2012.

  1. jtoul2

    jtoul2 Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    287
    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    Location:
    Australia
    hey guys

    i am currently working on a rickenbacker 4001 bass for someone and am pretty much ready to sand down and start finishing. except for the headstock :/ i have never done a neck before this but because it is a neck through style bass i didn't have much choice other then jump in and try it. one thing i am struggling with it thinking down the head stock i has to have about half of the wood taken off and then wings added. below are a few old pictures but they show the problem well enough.

    View attachment 108270

    View attachment 108271

    View attachment 108272

    I have a bandsaw but the blade is really thin and basically it's just not going to work. ha have most hand tool and a drill press, jigsaw, router, router table and other power tools along those lines.

    if anyone has any suggestions they would be greatly appreciated. or if someone in the brisbane area could give me a hand that would be awesome even just letting me use your bandsaw to get it down to the right length.

    cheers

    Jordan
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2012
  2. joshwertheimer

    joshwertheimer TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    93
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2010
    Location:
    Brooklyn NY
    I use a router table, but not on angled headstocks. You'd need some kind of jig. Do you have a sanding drum for your drill press?
     
  3. joshwertheimer

    joshwertheimer TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    93
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2010
    Location:
    Brooklyn NY
  4. jtoul2

    jtoul2 Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    287
    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    Location:
    Australia
    nah i don't have a sanding drum but im definitely investing in one soon.
    yer the only problem with that jig is i need the waste off the bottom of the headstock. :(
     
  5. Ben_55

    Ben_55 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    29
    Posts:
    70
    Joined:
    May 8, 2011
    Location:
    Leeds, UK
    Have you thought about just going for it with a hand saw then sanding? :rolleyes:
     
  6. Jack Wells

    Jack Wells Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    18,425
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2003
    Location:
    Albuquerque, USA
    I think a good sharp handsaw may be the best choice. Saw along all sides you have access to so these kerfs can act a guide for the saw when you start sawing from a corner. Does that make any sense?

    By the way, how did it manage to get that thick?
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2012
  7. Picton

    Picton Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    46
    Posts:
    2,666
    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2009
    Location:
    Reading, Massachusetts
    If you like using handplanes, a scrub plane and 10 minutes' vigorous effort would get you most of the way there... the difficulty would lie in figuring out how to secure the workpiece while you plane. A rasp would take care of the transition area between neck and headstock.

    A long spindle-sanding drum, either in your drill press (as mentioned) or on a ROSS, would also do it, but I'd find the amount of dust annoying. There's also a Saf-T-Planer tool you can buy for your drill press, though you'd still have to solve the problem of securing it safely. It would be a bit easier if the edges were parallel.

    FWIW, this task is always a toughie for me, too. Even though I start off with a whole lot less waste.
     
  8. bubba105

    bubba105 Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    159
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Location:
    New York City
    Get a thicker blade for you bandsaw. Make sure you're comfortable with the task before you start. If you need help with the unwieldiness of the guitar body/neck, get someone to hold it in place while YOU move it forward. Do a dress rehearsal of what you want them to do & make sure they know you'll be doing the manipulating. Most importantly, let the tool do the work, don't force the wood into the blade & you'll get a much straighter cut. Slow & steady wins the race.

    What are you going to do with the waste from the bottom of the headstock?
     
  9. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    23,498
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
    You've seen the pictures of simple router planer jigs here on the forum.
    http://www.leestyron.com/sled.php

    http://woodzone.com/tips/planerjig.htm

    They have two "rails" taller than your peghead thickness and are attached to some base material. The router is mounted to a wide plate that sits on the rails. Add a little piece of material to the veneer side of the peghead to elevate it so that the fretboard clears the base, and you can rout it off after cutting some of the excess off on the bandsaw. Note you'll have to put something like wedges under the neck to hold the neck upward since you don't want it flopping around.

    Another thing would be to use double sided tape on the veneer side and tape it to a longer, straight board that you can position next to a fence on the bandsaw and then just cut it off and sand it down.
     
  10. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    37
    Posts:
    18,974
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2007
    Location:
    Garland, Maine
    This is what I was going to suggest.
     
  11. Shepherd

    Shepherd Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,113
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Location:
    Maple Ridge, Canada
    ^^ This. Spend the $20 and get a better blade which you can always use later. Using a fence hold the body and guide the neck along the fence. Done in less than 20 seconds.
     
  12. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    23,498
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
    Easier said than done unless you have somebody to hold the end of the neck and body up.
     
  13. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    61
    Posts:
    11,631
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2010
    Location:
    East Tennessee
    My lord that's thick :eek:. Well, at least you've learned to thin the peghead before you glue the neck in the body. Guitarbuilder's suggestion is the best. I use a variation of this, I built a small adapter for the baseplate of my laminate trimmer, U-shaped. It's roughly 6" long by 4" wide and the trimmer mounts offset on top of the "U". The maximum depth it can achieve is 9/16 from the bottom/open end of the U (the average peghead thickness). The peghead must clamped/taped flat on the front to a level surface (I use a 3' piece of 2 X 10 floor joist :lol:). The tail end of the neck is clamped up in the air to various adapter boards/wedges I cut to fit and zip them down to the 2 X 10 with sheetrock screws (such wonderful inventions :)) then run my little router over the back of the peghead until the trimmer bottoms out. This leaves the majority of the peghead 9/16" thick with only the transition to be worked down with a rasp. This all sounds MUCH more complicated than it actually is in practice. It's just what I came up with to use the tools I already had :rolleyes:. Good luck to you whatever method you use ;)

    Dave
     
  14. Shepherd

    Shepherd Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,113
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Location:
    Maple Ridge, Canada
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Shepherd
    ^^ This. Spend the $20 and get a better blade which you can always use later. Using a fence hold the body and guide the neck along the fence. Done in less than 20 seconds.

    Easier said than done unless you have somebody to hold the end of the neck and body up.

    Never had a problem with it, it's not rocket science.
     
  15. jtoul2

    jtoul2 Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    287
    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    Location:
    Australia
    thanks guys im sure i will be able to figure something out between all the suggestions.

    cheers
     
  16. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    23,498
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
    Never had a problem with it, it's not rocket science.



    No but there are some phyics involved. The guitar is like a lever and nut area is the fulcrum and the peghead is like the load you are trying to move. Any slight movement of the body by your non fence guiding hand is transmitted easily to the peghead.

    My point was that holding 99 percent of the mass of the maple bass guitar with one hand ,while pushing the 1 percent up against the fence makes it likely that the peghead won't come out consistantly one thickness ( flat) unless somebody else can help hold it up and yes, I've tried this similar thing a few times with less than perfect results. They were wavy. As always YMMV....:)
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.