Help on RR Blonde Nitro

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by ahebbert, Feb 22, 2018.

  1. ahebbert

    ahebbert NEW MEMBER!

    Posts:
    2
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2014
    Location:
    Cape Town, RSA
    Hi,

    I am doing a blonde tele ('59) and am using Reranch blonde nitro cans and have run into an issue. (This is my first time using Reranch cans and a transparent finish)

    I have read many great things about Reranch so I am sure this is my mistake! But not sure what I am doing wrong, and more importantly - how to fix!

    After the first coat (thin and dry), I tried to lay the second coat wetter but it went on dry and left the surface rough, and not very transparent - is this overspray?

    How do I deal with this? Sand out with 1200 wet paper, steel wool, or 320 and start all over?

    I bought the can a couple years back now - would this be an issue? The weather was perfect so I don't think it was that.

    Any help would be appreciated!


    IMG_4374.JPG
     
  2. poolshark

    poolshark Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    554
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2011
    Location:
    Tallahassee
    Shoot for the correct amount of color and opacity with your color coats. Getting a smooth finish isn’t a big deal at the color stage. Follow up with clear shot wet, and it’ll even out the finish texture.

    It’s tough to tell on my phone, but your color looks a little speckly and uneven. Clear might blend it if you shoot wet enough. You could also follow up with more color, but your finish will be more opaque. If you want less opaque, you’ll need to sand back and redo it. Ideally, you’d mix the color thinner so you can shoot wetter coats with less opacity. You’ve got limited options in a can.

    Edit: Just looked at this on a desktop. I see the dry bumps you're talking about. The phenomenon is called overspray, but it's kind of a misnomer in this case since the body was your target. You're really just shooting too dry. I'd brush or lightly sand the bigger pebbles off, shoot a wet clear and hope for the best. Your color is still pretty speckly, so if the clear doesn't homogenize it to your satisfaction, sand back and shoot color again.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2018
  3. philosofriend

    philosofriend Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    983
    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2015
    Location:
    Kalamazoo
    You don't need to strip it but you do need to level it. This doesn't need to take a long time but you have to make sure your tools are not causing more damage. If you use sandpaper it has to be backed with something truly flat. This is for the top back and the flat portions of the sides. Use the finest sandpaper that knocks the high spots off quickly. If the sandpaper gets hard spots of melted finish on it you need new sandpaper, though sometimes a steel brush can knock the "corns" off the sandpaper. Some people can level a surface quickly with a razor blade used as a scraper. Either grind the corners off the blade or put tape on both outside portions of the blade. Me, I usually cause more damage with the blade than it is worth. Some people level as they go layer by layer, some wait until there is a lot of finish built up. Sounds like you want to take some finish off now to keep it more transparent.

    Your nozzle might need cleaning. Soak it in a closed jar with lacquer thinner, scrub it with a toothbrush, soak it again. When you get a nozzle that works great store it in the jar of thinner.

    Get good lighting and stare at the finish as you apply it. If it runs, go faster and/ or hold the nozzle farther away. If it is dry and gravelly, slow down. If it is not going right you have to make quick decisions. With a spray gun you have a lot of adjustments but with spray cans it is mostly keeping the nozzle clean and knowing when to throw a can away.

    Just think about the guys who decorate train cars. They travel with a pocketful of nozzles.
     
  4. kidmo

    kidmo Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,660
    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Location:
    Funkytown
    My first experience with RR was similar with transparent white. It was a bit rough and I took a piece of brown paper bag and rubbed it down smooth. Worked ok for me but then I did'n't do a clear coat a la Vince Gill's tele.
     
  5. ahebbert

    ahebbert NEW MEMBER!

    Posts:
    2
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2014
    Location:
    Cape Town, RSA
    Thanks for the input - I will wet sand the rough off lightly and try a coat of wet clear and see what happens this weekend!
    Much appreciated
     
  6. bullfrogblues

    bullfrogblues Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,146
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2011
    Location:
    Southeast Florida
    I wouldn't wet sand if it were me. Just dry sand with a block, 400 grit and a light touch.
     
  7. koolaide

    koolaide Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    519
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2009
    Location:
    south carolina
    The lacquer is drying before it hits the surface, could be weather is too hot, or not the right thinner or amount. Most likely your technique, given it is a spray can. As others have noted you will need to sand the surface just enough to level it and remove the dried overspray. Use a small flat block say 3x3 inches. The finest sandpaper that gets the job done. I would use 400-600. Be careful if you wet sand, as you could cause moisture issues. If you choose to use water, use very little. I would soak the sandpaper is water with a drop or two of dish soap, shake off the excess water, rinse and repeat. Also I would use a 3m rubber block- thin black one.It is made for wet sanding cars.

    As for technique, you should get closer, and move quicker to keep the finish transparent, as opposed to moving farther away. It is the distance that is letting the lacquer dry before it hits the surface. By being closer the finish stays wetter. Practice on paper or cardboard taped to the wall to get your technique down.

    Good Luck,

    Jim
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.