Help me identify Wood

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by WrayGun, Jul 3, 2018.

  1. jimbo735

    jimbo735 Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,472
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2011
    Location:
    Michigan
    Still looks like popular!:)
     
  2. jimbo735

    jimbo735 Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,472
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2011
    Location:
    Michigan
    Poplar is properly popular in parts of Pennsylvania.:)
     
  3. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,667
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2012
    Location:
    North of Boston
    that's plausible
     
  4. NotAnotherHobby

    NotAnotherHobby Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,594
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2015
    Location:
    Da' Magic Mittin'
    I'll got with Poplar for $400, Alex.

    The knots sort of give it away.

    Best way to distinguish between a light Poplar and Maple is that Poplar will dent easier than the Maple. When it comes to toughness, in general, Maple > Poplar > Pine. Pine usually has sap pockets somewhere on the wood. The knots in pine are often large, tend to check when they dry, and tend to have sap pockets (or crystalized sap) in them.
     
    eallen likes this.
  5. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    9,837
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2003
    Location:
    Lawndale CA
    True, But we could not touch the wood in the pictures to try to dent it. But physical testing IS part fo actual identification.

    As far as knots, clear pine doesn't have them nor sap pockets. It's very common on the west coast.

    That piece could simply be taken to a local lumberyard for identification. And it may very well be poplar (not "popular").
     
  6. NotAnotherHobby

    NotAnotherHobby Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,594
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2015
    Location:
    Da' Magic Mittin'
    1 - It has three small knots, and they are very visible on the pictures.

    2 - It is not clear pine, given that it has knots that are clearly visible.

    3 - Not all pine that is shipped to a store is cut locally. Most store inventory, unless you are a local mill, gets their supplies from a "broker" or a "wholesaler" (as generic terms). Your pine in California could be coming all the way from Sweden or eastern Canada. Michigan has LOADS of pine and does LOADS of milling. Not every piece of wood that appears in a place like Rockler is gotten locally. Then again, if the wood was gotten from a place like Rockler, the OP wouldn't be trying to identify the wood.

    4 - The fact that some pine does not have sap and sap pockets is noted by my use of the conditionals "usually," "often," and the phrase "tend to." Even sappy wood, sometimes (conditional), does not have sap pockets or is sappy. Sometimes you get a "dry" piece.

    5 - I did not use the word "popular" to describe the species of wood. However, for future reference, it is advisable that you not misspell the word "of" when correcting someone's spelling.
     
  7. Count

    Count Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,207
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2009
    Location:
    Tenterfield, Australia
    Isn’t Poplar light in weight?
     
  8. eallen

    eallen Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,435
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2013
    Location:
    Bargersville/Indianapolis, Indiana
    It varies greatly between trees and area. I did a tele build 2 years ago from poplar that was 7 lbs complete. I just finished another tele that is 8 1/4 lbs. I bought the wood at the same time, from the same place, different trees.
     
  9. Count

    Count Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,207
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2009
    Location:
    Tenterfield, Australia
    Thanks, in Oz we don't have native Poplar trees nor any milled Poplar. I have self milled Lombardy Poplar which grows in some places as an introduced ornamental tree, it was extremely light.
     
  10. drmmrr55

    drmmrr55 Tele-Holic

    Age:
    66
    Posts:
    874
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2017
    Location:
    Federal Way, Washington
    Definitely Poplar, the neck on my '58 Silvertone looks exactly like that, and it's made of Poplar. IMG_0212 (2).JPG
    IMG_0212 (2).JPG
     
  11. Hobs

    Hobs Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    287
    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2011
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    Sure looks like tulip poplar to me. Which isn't really a poplar, but that's another issue.
     
  12. ftbtx

    ftbtx Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    1,587
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2016
    Location:
    The west side of Texas
    I see a market for wood DNA home test kits.
     
  13. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    9,837
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2003
    Location:
    Lawndale CA
    Maybe it would be helpful to decide what is poplar and what isn't. Generic wood names have become badly mixed, especially in the last 15-20 years.

    "Poplar" is one of those, one reason being that the name is often applied to other wood. Mahogany is another. If everyone isn't on the same playing field different rules will apply.

    Descriptions commonly differ by geography, where common names (like "poplar") are applied to similar woods that are locally available. "Tulip poplar" is commonly called just "poplar" in the eastern US when it's not poplar at all. Out west we see wood labeled "poplar" or "whitewood" that is spruce, douglas fir, white/clear pine or poplar. The label "poplar" is only common if it's plain looking with (or without) brown, gray or dirty-green streaks.

    Doesn't matter if it's softwood or a soft hardwood - marketing departments use generic names. wood labeled "poplar" wasn't even found in southern California lumberyards until the advent of the nationally-marketed "big box" stores 25 years ago or so, and only became common 10-15 years ago.

    To muddy things even more, "yellow poplar", aka "tulip poplar", aka "tulipwood" is the one with green streaks. And isn't actually poplar.

    Again - my point is it's nearly impossible to precisely identify some type of wood by looking at a picture, and you have to decide what identification rules apply so everyone is on the same page.

    http://www.wood-database.com/wood-articles/poplar-cottonwood-and-aspen-whats-what/
     
    collapsing wave likes this.
  14. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,803
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2017
    Location:
    corner of walk and don't walk
    Although there have been attempts to muddy the waters :), we are talking about one specific piece of wood here.

    Wraygun asked for help to identify it, and posted a clear picture of it.

    Although it's nearly impossible to identify a type of wood from a picture ;), several forum members defied the odds and correctly identified the piece of wood as . . . . . poplar!

    I raise my cup and drink to your health, all of you helpful and daring unsung heroes of the visual wood identification world!!! :D



    Best Regards,
    Geo.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.