Help me country

ndcaster

Doctor of Teleocity
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Any and all suggestions on where to start, both listening and playing, are appreciated.

Jimmie Rodgers
Maybelle Carter and The Carter Family
Bob Wills
Jimmy Bryant (just because)

Ernest Tubb and the Texas Troubadours
the Lester Flatt run (from bluegrass)
Hank Williams, Sr
Lefty Frizzell
songs by Hank Cochran

early Willie Nelson and the Nashville sound
check out country crooners from the 60s, including George Jones
the Bakersfield sound: Wynn Stewart, Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, etc.

Willie Nelson's album, Red Headed Stranger
Waylon Jennings
Kris Kristofferson
Dolly Parton
Emmylou Harris

the 80s? I don't know what to recommend other than Merle Haggard and Marty Stuart, I was listening to metal

Dwight Yoakam and Pete Anderson
many, many artists from "90's Country," especially Randy Travis
Alan Jackson
George Strait

Tyler Childers and anyone from eastern Kentucky
Colter Wall and Corb Lund from Canada
Sam Outlaw, southern California
Zephaniah OHora, Brooklyn

The list is actually pretty huge and varied.
 

burtf51

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I'm 70 started learning when I was 10, went through the popular genres of the time as a teen in the 60's, then I discovered blues in my middle to late teens, played country which is called classic country now, on to western swing and jump blues, some jazzier things and I guess when I turned 60 and stopped playing out I went back to my beginnings and started working on traditional music trying to learn to play it the right way...there's an old saying "you got to learn to walk before you run" ....laugh if you want but playing the melodies to old nursery rhymes, traditional songs like Wildwood Flower, Ole Suzanna, Little Liza Jane on and on all the tunes and artist that established the genres will take you to new heights as a player, now you're playing with feeling, soul and emotion and that's not learned by working up a new standards.
 

John_B

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Watch all of the reruns for the Marty Stuart Show (RFD Channel) which shows two of the best country guitarists showcasing 1930's acoustic country finger picking up to and thru 1970's outlaw country. This would be fun homework you can do every day or every week. Quite an education. Eugene Moles Jr's playing on The Merlin Gene Show is in the same category!!! Eugene has royal blood in his veins. He is a 2nd or 3rd generation Bakersfield guitar slinger.

I HIGHLY suggest you visit guitarist Ken Carson's website - Country GuitarChops.com. He teaches country guitar playing starting with beginning country 101. He is an extremely talented ex Nashville guitar monster.

I love watching Dale Watson play his telecaster!

James Burton- WOW!!!

And of course Redd! How can I not mention Redd Volkaert? As mentioned, he offers DVD lessons but I do not know if he offers beginner lessons. Just watching him play with Heybale on youtube will show you what a real country guitarist still does today. HE replaced Roy Nichols in Merle Haggard's band- The Strangers !!!

The guitar playing in all of Nashville's 1960's country music is what it is all about. This leads me to Bakersfield.

Last but not least, to me, is listening to the first two albums by Merle Haggard and Buck Owens. Roy Nichols, Don Rich, Phil Baugh and James Burton show the way country guitar is done, period.

Glad to read you want to look into country guitar. It is a blast and you can proudly play it when you are old, just like a lot of us did when we were young.
 
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2HBStrat

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Four Rivers Area of Middle America
Alright, folks, I need some help, and figure there are people here who can direct me.

I want to start learning and playing some country.

I've never really listened to country...I've always been a rock/hard rock/metal guy (or classical/orchestral); grew up with the Stones, Queen, and Zeppelin, took a hard right turn into metal around the time Master of Puppets and (especially) Rust In Peace dropped, and never looked back.

I've accidentally heard some country or country-ish noises, of course....the Stones had their country-ish period (Little Red Rooster, even Wild Horses to a degree), and of course I love me some Johnny Cash (because it's Johnny Cash and I'm not a monster). I'm also a child of the 80s and early 90s, so I was in high school when the Garth Brooks "arena country/rock" thing happened, and I couldn't help but hear some of that.

Outside of that, I'm not sure where to start. What I'm trying to do is get that "shock" of motivation and inspiration from jumping into the deep end of a genre I know nothing about, and country is the modern genre I know the least about. I'm comfortable truly going deep end....don't feel like you have to bridge the gap for me and make it an easy entry.

Any and all suggestions on where to start, both listening and playing, are appreciated.
Start listening to your local country music radio station, the modern country channel, not so much the oldies channel, although that's fine, too. Listen to Brad Paisley, Vince Gill, Brent Mason, Brent Rowan, Marty Stuart and The Fabulous Superlatives, too. Chicken pickin' is your friend
 

Jazzcaster21

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Redd is an inspiration to me, not just because of the amazing playing, but the fact that he does it with those little sausage fingers. :lol:
He was super cool when I met him at the last gig he played near me. Funny too. He told me whenever I am ready to look him up on Skype for some lessons. Once I get through is True Fire course, I might have to do that.
 

Jazzcaster21

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That's where you start. Saying you want to learn country is like saying you want to learn rock music. What country? Traditional, Outlaw Country, Bro Country, Country Rock? The first thing you need to do is identify what genre of country you want to learn. The second thing is to start listening to it. The third thing is to start transcribing it and learning it. It's like learning a new language. You aren't going to learn a few random licks and all of a sudden sound like a country player.

I'd also suggest lessons with a good country player. You can get lessons with world class players via Skype. I've had some lessons with Johnny Hiland, Daniel Donato and a DC guy name Dave Chappel who is probably one of the best guitar players you've never heard of.

Good luck
Yeah, you got to get it in your ears, whatever style of music you are trying to learn. I play jazz mainly and when I first started playing it I listened to nothing else and played nothing else for a long time. I was a 100% jazz snob. I still listen and play jazz at 90% of my gigs, but not 100% like I used to. Same thing with classical guitar: when I wanted to get a certain proficiency of classical guitar skills together, I listened to a lot of classical guitar music and realized how many different ways one player can interpret one classical piece.

Right now, I am listening to traditional, classic, outlaw country 90% of the time, because that is the style that I have been working on A LOT over the last few months. I don't really go past these genres right now because that's the stuff I like and can't stand bro-country. Even if the playing is top notch, the subject matter is just awful.

You gotta find what you like, what speaks to you because that is what will keep you motivated to show up and put the work in. If you do anything just because someone says "you need to" and you don't feel a connection to it well then, you won't last for long.
 

Jazzcaster21

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All good advice! Here are a few more ideas:

- Listen to the pre- and anti-"Nashville Sound" folks — folks like Roy Acuff, Jimmie Rogers, Loretta Lynne, Lefty Frizzel, Hank Williams, Buck Owens, Patsy Montana, Hank Williams III, Roy Orbison, Carl Perkins . . .

- Listen to some of the sixties and seventies hippie acts that introduced a younger generation to country, like the Dead, the Byrds, Graham Parsons and the Flying Burrito Brothers, Buffalo Springfield, the Lovin' Spoonful, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Dan Hicks and his Hot Licks, New Riders of the Purple Sage, Commander Cody and the Lost Planet Airmen, Asleep at the Wheel . . . . There's a ton of inspiration in there.

- I'd be hard-pressed to call "Little Red Rooster" country: Blues doesn't get any bluesier than Howlin' Wolf! On the other hand, there's plenty of country blues out there. Doc Watson, John Hurt, Ry Cooder . . . .

- Pay attention to the go-to sidemen and sidewomen, like James Burton, Cindy Cashdollar, Albert Lee, Brent Mason, Amos Garrett . . . .

- Listen to some hot-licks innovators — Merle Travis, Danny Gatton, Roy Clark, Marty Stuart, Alison Krauss, Pete Anderson . . . .

- Check out some country singer/songwriters — Guy Clark, John Eddy, Ramblin' Jack Elliot, Jerry Jeff Walker, Willie Nelson, Patsy Cline, Mary Chapin Carpenter, David Allen Coe . . . .

(For what it's worth, Garth has never sounded like country to me. He's a great pop artist, but there ain't no twang in his thang!)
What Lovin' Spoonful is country-ish?
 

OlRedNeckHippy

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..... the sixties and seventies hippie acts that introduced a younger generation to country, like the Dead, the Byrds, Graham Parsons and the Flying Burrito Brothers, Buffalo Springfield, the Lovin' Spoonful, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Dan Hicks and his Hot Licks, New Riders of the Purple Sage, Commander Cody and the Lost Planet Airmen.......
That is where I come from, how I ended up in country bands, especially the Dead and the Riders.
I refer to NRPS as Cowboy Hippy music.
But - Skynyd, Outlaws, Tucker, Pure Prairie League, Charlie, hell, back in the late 70's I was fronting a band that did 7 Outlaws tunes and 9 Skynyrd tunes!
 

ArdeliasTele

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Darkthrone

I may have slipped a red herring in there to see if you're paying attentinoon.
:)

I mean...everyone keeps telling me there are many (very distinct and different sounding) subgenres of country.

What would you call this one? As a country noob I'd be tempted to call it Black Country, but I'm a pretty big noob.
 

bottlenecker

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Get an overview from the beginning.

Carter Family
Jimmie Rodgers
Hank Williams
Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys
Roy Acuff
Earnest Tubb
Merle Travis
Joe and Rose Lee Maphis
Jimmy Bryant and Speedy West
Wynn Stewart
Buck Owens
Merle Haggard
Dolly Parton
Willie Nelson
Loretta Lynn

and don't stop listening to Johnny Cash.

That's maybe the beginning of a good start.
 

ndcaster

Doctor of Teleocity
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familiarize yourself with the great steel guitar players

Leon McCauliffe
Joaquin Murphey
Buddy Charleton
Don Helms
Speedy West
Santo Farina
Ralph Mooney
Buddy Emmons
Norman Hamlet
Herb Remington
Eddie Rivers
Paul Franklin
Jon Graboff
Jeremy Wakefield
Zach Moulton

great musicians!

 

Tall-Fir

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I believe to start playing and understanding country style guitar, one should have a clear understanding of the playing of Mother Maybelle Carter. Her playing is the basis for all that was to follow.

I would like to make myself clear on something. Lynyrd Skynyrd, Keith Richards, ZZ Top, Gram Parsons, heroin addiction are not the musicians or activities one would look to to start understanding techniques of country guitar playing.
 

oregomike

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Alright, folks, I need some help, and figure there are people here who can direct me.

I want to start learning and playing some country.

I've never really listened to country...I've always been a rock/hard rock/metal guy (or classical/orchestral); grew up with the Stones, Queen, and Zeppelin, took a hard right turn into metal around the time Master of Puppets and (especially) Rust In Peace dropped, and never looked back.

I've accidentally heard some country or country-ish noises, of course....the Stones had their country-ish period (Little Red Rooster, even Wild Horses to a degree), and of course I love me some Johnny Cash (because it's Johnny Cash and I'm not a monster). I'm also a child of the 80s and early 90s, so I was in high school when the Garth Brooks "arena country/rock" thing happened, and I couldn't help but hear some of that.

Outside of that, I'm not sure where to start. What I'm trying to do is get that "shock" of motivation and inspiration from jumping into the deep end of a genre I know nothing about, and country is the modern genre I know the least about. I'm comfortable truly going deep end....don't feel like you have to bridge the gap for me and make it an easy entry.

Any and all suggestions on where to start, both listening and playing, are appreciated.
Although not truly "country", some would say Texas country folk, etc. Check out Townes Van Zandt (specifically Live at the Old Quarter), Guy Clark (Old No. 1) to start. Those two got me into finger-style in a big way. True poets. Robert Earl Keen, Billy Joe Shaver, Nancy Griffith, Lucinda Williams, Kacey Musgraves, Doc Watson, Jerry Jeff Walker. Have to mention Waylon, Willie, Merle, Cash, of course. Sigh, was trying to keep this short, but...
 




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