Help matching Sherwood Green metallic color

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by 1954 Esquire, Mar 20, 2019.

  1. 1954 Esquire

    1954 Esquire TDPRI Member

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    Have finished the body for a Telecaster build and want to paint it Sherwood Green metallic. Anyone know of a spray paint that you can buy off the shelf. Found a couple of different colors of Duplicolor at the local auto supply store. It is hard to tell if any of them would be close, I am having to look online at Sherwood green guitars to try to get the right color.
     
  2. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    Have you checked ReRanch? They are the only other possible source. I did some Sherwood Green years ago but had to mix it myself from bulk materials. It cost a couple hundred dollars in materials just to make the stuff.

    You just "finished" a body? Do you mean you built one? Terminology i important - the coating process is "finishing", so it sounds like you already coated it but want to re-do it. Bt I'm guessing that NOT what you mean.

    What kind of wood is if - and have you tested the moisture content? If not, get a $15-20 moisture meter and test it - if it's over 11% it needs to dry before finishing.

    You may already be aware of the following, but as someone who hasn't posted all that much, I'm guessing not. If you do I suggest reading it anyway - especially the last part about spraying metallics.:

    How are you planning to coat the body? You mention"paint" several times and paint is not a good guitar finish compared to lacquer. But coating a guitar body takes several different materials, specific temp/humidity conditions and dust control/ventilation,, odor control. safety gear (a cartridge respirator and full coverage goggles).

    It also takes quite a bit of research/reading - and practice spraying of the entire system on scrap before starting on the guitar. You'll make mistakes, ask questions, refine techniques and go through the whole learning process without having to strip/sand away parts of the body and spend tons of extra money on materials to fix something that shouldn't have needed fixing.

    Metallics also require special spray techniques. Always 90-degrees from the surface and always in one direction only (not left to right and then right to left, or up/then down - which cause lines).

    You don't just apply green "paint"
     
  3. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I also suggest ReRanch. I prefer cellulose lacquer because it’s forgiving, and spray cans aren’t the best.

    I’ve also used my local auto supply mega store to match a Ice Blue Metallic body, using the old Ford(?) paint code. They looked it up, and it wasn’t close (no surprise), but the dude who mixes up the paint was pro—we matched it by both our eyes. The flake size was off but not big deal. Point is: use your eyes and find a color you like. You really won’t know the final hue until you undercoat it, spray it, then clear coat it.

    05E6135D-64D0-425A-B6D2-642F02B81826.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2019
    Tonetele, DHart and Bruxist like this.
  4. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    ???

    ReRanch sells nitrocellulose lacquer in aerosols. You prefer cellulose lacquer to - "what" (there's a word missing)? And spray cans aren't the "best" what? I wasn't sure wha you meant, so I'm asking because the OP may not understand what to ask.

    I'll add - aerosols aren't the best application system, but are not the worst by far, especially with the improvement in tip quality over the last 10 years. A cheap conventional rig (a small compressor - or even a large one) with a $25 gun is harder to use to get a decent finish job than even aerosols.

    Normally the metallics at auto supply stores are nitrocellulose or acrylic lacquers, or blends. Either is fine and can be applied over each other (water based lacquers are totally different, rarely encountered - and only in bulk). But avoid all "enamels".

    What auto supply store do you have in Phoenix that tints bulk lacquer? Around LA I don't know of any that even carry it in bulk, and even professional paint stores that carry bulk lacquer aren't allowed to tint it.

    Absolutely. FWW - the original colors from the 50's and 60's always varied - if they were one of the few colors actually stocked (usually at their main supplier, Fullerton Paint - which carried several brands) the batches varied from the manufacturing plants anyway. And if the store had to mix them from a tint base there was even more or a variation, especially if metallic pigments were involved - they had to be poured and measured by hand, not out of a semi-calibrated machine..

    It wasn't a real formal process - George Fullerton would sometimes walk the few blocks up there and kill time talking while the used the tint machine and shaker - just like you going into a store and buying a gallon of custom mix house paint, except the formulae were in a book - not computer. And tint machines are rarely cleaned - so they spit out all sorts of slightly off-quantity amounts of concentrated colors.

    They'd brush out a small sample on the top of the can, and use the hose from a hair dryer to "force dry" it - which ALSO changes the color. So you had color cards that were printed using inks with powders - not actual lacquer - tint bases that varied in formulation AND fill amount from batch to batch; several tinting colors (usually 2-4) each squirted into a can in amounts slightly different from the formula amount; and spray equipment in varied degrees of cleanliness from day to day.

    So ANY custom color guitars coated from ONE can looked similar when new - then underwent years of aging of different types. And guitars coated from a different can might appear slightly difference when new...and drift off in other direction.

    What's my point in this long , seemingly-pointless post?

    To the OP - WHICH "Sherwood Green" do you want? Because if you look at 200 vintage Sherwood Green Strats you'll find pretty darned close to 200 distinct colors. And of those 200 about 50will shift visually in distinct ways under different types of light and 50 another way, and 50 another...and so on.

    So it's critically important with metallics to understand that 1. You just have to pick some sort of standard you like out of the huge number of variations, and 2. You can't always get what you want.
     
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  5. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I’m saying that I prefer shooting nitro lacquer. I shoot cans because I dont have the space for a compressor and all associated equipment. I’m a painter myself, and have used airbrushes, so I understand a little bit about quality in this department. I can easily touch up the nitro lacquer if dust falls into it, and it will. Cans will spit, they are not even enough in pressure through their use-life span. All kinds of issues I just deal with by shooting another layer of lacquer and/or a little sanding. It will all get leveled and buffed in the end. So if I am shooting cans like the OP wants to, then I’m recommending ReRanch, nitrocellulose lacquer. Yes, I’ve done all the tricks, read plenty of threads, including your posts.

    I don’t know what I was shooting for the refinish and match job above but it wasn’t nitro lacquer. They made me the cans on the spot. It was one of my first refins, so I wasn’t as informed at the time. The refin wasn’t even done the ‘normal’ way because I had to preserve original spray can art work on the back. The shop I continue to use is Space Age Auto Paint Store in Mesa, AZ. Maybe it’s because you’re in Cali? In this store, I have to get out quick because of the smell. I wore a mask in the shop one day, and everyone looked at me, very dull eyed. There were no blinks.
     
  6. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    Have you checked out the compact YHVLP units? MNot the $120 Earlex that Harbor Freight and Rockler sells (it works fine, but is a "bleeder" system with air always running and has a cheap brass needle and air cap), but the step above? There are excellent $3-500 units lo larger than a Princeton Reverb that you can find used for $2-300. If you're a painter it'd be worth its weight in gold - I use my 25 year old Capsray at least once a week and for all sorts of painting - but it's unsurpassed on guitars. Compact, light, pinpoint control, little masking and what tiny amount of overspray there is can be swept up!

    Seriously - buy one. Exponentially better than spray cans - and you won't have to pay to have them filled.

    I'll look around - there are some auto paint places nearby, but didn't look like "stores" - more like nicer paint shops. I'm not able to do much nowadays because of some physical problems but I'd like to find a source to recommend. Thanks.

    Oh - and I'll wear my respirator when I go in :lol:
     
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  7. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity

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    I was there a couple weeks ago pricing paint for my truck. I used to go there just to look at the old teardrop Dymaxion type car that they have there in the showroom. I was a bit surprised how much automotive paint costs now... I guess I will primer it with spray cans again to get by for a while till I have the body prepped better. I picked up a spray can of POR15 top coat for some rust preventative stuff I was doing on the truck.
     
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  8. Peltogyne

    Peltogyne Tele-Afflicted

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    I have seen so many variations on what is called sherwood, some mid toned, others quite dark. I agree with Silverface's post about the amount of variation from one "official" version to another. This is Duplicolor's Metalspecks green. I think it could satisfy some versions of Sherwood on the lighter side and is an easy to find and inexpensive color.

    body-2.jpeg

    This is also called Sherwood by Sadowsky

    [​IMG]

    Now Lake Placid Blue, that name gets applied to anything blue. There's no agreement there anymore.
     
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