Help a tube newbie select an amp

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by davo8411, Jul 19, 2021.

  1. arlum

    arlum Tele-Holic Platinum Supporter

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    Will you be playing lead or rhythm. It's just my opinion but, I believe a lead guitarist needs a tube amp they can drive into breakup. If your fellow guitarist is playing rhythm with a 50 watt I'd look at a tube amp in the 30 to 36 watt range. It will break up at a volume that would compliment the rhythm player at comparable volume levels. If you're going to primarily be the rhythm player and you lead guitarist has a 50 watt amp I'd be looking for a cleaner amp between 50 and 80 watts or even up to 100 watts. Watts in a tube amp have more to do with how long it will remain clean before breakup. A Vox AC30, (approx 36 watts), dimed will be as loud or louder than a 60 watt Fender played clean or crunchy.
     
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  2. Lawdawg

    Lawdawg Tele-Afflicted

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    For Neil Young/Crazy Horse and within your budget I think a used Origin 50 combo would be a great choice. Just flipping through Reverb and I saw some used Origin 50 combos right around $500. It will definitely be loud enough and if you like it, you can always change the speaker or add an extension cab. The Origin50 is at the top of the list for my next amp purchase as I love the lower gain JTM45 voicing.

    If you like the Vox tone, you can probably find a used AC30 custom classic somewhere in the $550 - $700 range. Don't let the 30 watts fool you, a cranked AC30 will peel the paint off a wall. To put it in perspective, while my Hayseed30 (AC30 clone) isn't as loud as my 100 watt Twin Reverb -- which is stupid loud -- it's got more than enough juice to hang with it.

    EDIT -- just saw the post by @arlum and agree 100%
     
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  3. DaphneBlue

    DaphneBlue Tele-Holic

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    Neil Young and Crazy Horse with a les paul or a p90 yamaha?

    Don't waste your time: fender tweed. There are many available options and it depends on your budget.

    But remember: if you want to achieve that NY's grit, you'll have to crank your amp up. You don't need more than 30w to 50w.

    Anyway as you'll play gigs you might often be too loud for the venue if you play the way you describe it. So I'd recommend you start with the marshall and then see if it's too loud or not.
     
  4. Hpilotman

    Hpilotman Tele-Holic

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    I would choose either the BDville 2 x 12 or the Twin Reverb. The other band mates will not cover you up with those 2 amps.
     
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  5. codamedia

    codamedia Poster Extraordinaire

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    Marshall Origin 50. That Blues Deluxe will be cowering in the corner instantly :D.

    If you find the Marshall too loud.... there is a built in "powerstem" feature that works great and provides some different flavors to the amp. I find that in it's lowest setting I can coax out vintage Tweed Deluxe tones (Neil Young) quite convincingly.

    It's a one channel amp... so if you want variety of tones you will need some pedals. With a Twin on your list I didn't figure that would be an issue.

    Although the Hot Rod series is a huge seller and thought to be quite reliable over the years, there is certainly truth to what you say. The first 15 years of production had a serious design/layout flaw. In the auto world there would have been a recall notice.

    IMO a used Hot Rod (or blues series) would be too risky unless it's the latest revision.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2021 at 9:01 AM
  6. OldPup

    OldPup Tele-Meister

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    what production issues? I ask because I have an HRD from sometime in the mid 2000s.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2021 at 3:08 PM
  7. beachbreak

    beachbreak Tele-Meister

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    Buy the Twin Reverb and you'll never need another amp for the stage.
     
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  8. DeepDangler

    DeepDangler Tele-Holic

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    You should consider hybrid amps as well. A used or new Peavy bandit can be had for reasonable prices. Powerful 80 watt 1x12 with great dynamics.

    Used 100-300, new 430 I believe.
     
  9. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    Good questions to consider from the troops here, as always. What you play/want to explore determines what type of amp you'll most enjoy.

    I'd go the head + cab route. This way, you can make your own cabinets for quite varied sounds, or just one that you want to use with an easy-to-swap-out speaker, as that's key here. Your speaker will be very important, so you want maximum flexibility regarding it. This can be a pricier approach, but one very unlikely to leave you frustrated and spending even more money to replace/supplement.

    Plus, each part will be relatively light, compared to, say, a Twin.

    In terms of 30-50w heads, consider an older Bandmaster or Bandmaster Reverb (40w). (I have the latter, a '73.) Sounds great, easy to get serviced/keep running well. If you look carefully, you'll luck out. But have a good tech on-hand first, as any vintage amp you want to have checked out before you fire it up.

    A cheaper approach is the Ibanez TSA30H. About $350, used. I have the 15w version. Very fine Fenderish cleans. The on-board tube screamer (thus the "TS") is okay, but since I play clean to edge of dirt, I just use the on-board boost. For the Neil Young saturated sounds you play, that tube screamer will work well. You can get a pedal for it.

    Good luck, and post again when you've chosen something and can review how well it works for you....
     
  10. castermike

    castermike TDPRI Member

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  11. paulhealey

    paulhealey TDPRI Member

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    Twin is a great amp… if you never need to move it. It’s going to be pushing 100 lbs. Peavey Classic is another nice one. If it was me and I was going to the amp in one spot and not move it - I’d do the twin. If I was going to play with people the Peavey.
     
  12. paulhealey

    paulhealey TDPRI Member

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    Or if you’re handy, I’ve seen people mount Twins into a head and can setup. My main amp is basically modeled after a Twin a head and a 1 x 12.
     
  13. Lynxtrap

    Lynxtrap Tele-Afflicted

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    A Twin Reverb would probably be last on my list for playing Crazy Horse stuff. I would look at Tweeds or Marshalls in the 40-60W range.
     
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  14. gazzie

    gazzie TDPRI Member

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    Hear hear. Hot Rod Deluxe is a great amp. especially for cleans/slight break up. Very loud too if you want it to be. Though I don't play it loud in my band - I got over that decades ago! But nowadays I'm finding it way too heavy for my knackered back. My Blues Junior is easily loud enough for my band (rockabilly/country/surf) bit even that's getting too heavy for me. Probably going down the tone Master route if we ever get back to gigging/rehearsing! My friend has a 22 watt Fender Supersonic that is really loud and sounds fabulous- and of course a Deluxe Reverb will cover a lot of ground too!
     
  15. gazzie

    gazzie TDPRI Member

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    I have a different experience. I've gigged and rehearsed mine for about 15 years. Never let me down. Never even changed tubes.
     
  16. gazzie

    gazzie TDPRI Member

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    I disagree. I bought a used Hot Rod Deluxe over 15 years ago. Regularly gigged and rehearsed ever since. Never let me down. Still has the same tubes.
     
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  17. Rip

    Rip TDPRI Member

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    In my opinion it's hard to beat the Deville.... awesome power, very useable drive available and great Fender clean sounds. You really can't go wrong with any variation....the Hot Rod DeVille 2x12 is also excellent. Twins are good but much less versatile in different situations.... good luck
     
  18. Auherre756

    Auherre756 TDPRI Member

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    This might be heresy to the tube purists, but you should check out a Fender Stage 112SE. You can pick one up on CL or Reverb.com for under $300. It's got a surprisingly decent tube-like tone with lots of headroom (read: great with pedals). It's also LOUD as hell. I never got mine above 4 without everybody's ears bleeding.
     
  19. MrNoTalent

    MrNoTalent TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

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    I think the new Fender Custom Pro Reverb would be a nice amp for you....40 watts, but only weighs about 35 lbs and I think you could buy a brand new one for around $1100....I think it would be plenty LOUD.
     
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