Heating the garage.

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by Bugeater281, Nov 26, 2018.

  1. Bugeater281

    Bugeater281 Tele-Meister

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    How are you guys heating your garage? My garage is detached, currently I don’t have 220 or gas hooked up to it. It’s been too cold to work on anything. Just curious what you guys use and like, I was also thinking about a wood burner. I’m not sure what codes are on wood burners and how long they take to warm up a garage. Garage is a single car.
     
  2. Mouth

    Mouth Tele-Holic

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    What kind of construction and insulation?

    I had a cement block garage that was pointless for me to try to heat. A $600 electric bill never got me above 68 degrees.
     
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  3. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I have carhartt construction coveralls and also a cheaper Dickies blue coverall for auto mechanics. Basically I can't afford to insulate and heat the garage so I dress for outdoor work if woodworking there in winter.
    A halogen lamp is good for periodic hand warming, but running an electric heater was like shoveling sand against the tide.

    The old Monitor kero heaters are pretty good, but they may be out of production now.
    They vent out the wall so you don't need a chimney.
    Codes require insulated double wall metal chimney pipe now, which is almost $25/ foot, so a wood stove gets expensive quick. Makes sense in a wood shop since scrap is fuel, and wood makes quick short term heat.
    If you can put a stove where you only need like 16' of chimney, the insulated pipe and a pot belly might do well, but the pipe needs to go above the highest point on the roof for code.

    I'd bet a wood stove would get a one car to 65 in half an hour, at say 30f.
    Oil drum stoves are cheap and heat fast, used those in some shops.
     
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  4. spellcaster

    spellcaster Tele-Holic

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    Years ago, I ran a car stereo install business out of my home garage. Wood framed, unheated, uninsulated space that got bitterly cold in the winter. The tools never heat up either! After a few years, I found what was a solution. Insurance wouldn't allow a permanent heater, so I bought a portable drywall rocket that ran on propane. Ran it about 10 minutes an hour and it kept things tolerably warm. A 20 lb cylinder lasted about three weeks, so it was reasonably comfortable.

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Lonn

    Lonn Friend of Leo's

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    3 car garage not heated I'm afraid. My work area is in the gym in the basement. A large space heater would do the job though and I'd really like to get my stuff out of the gym and into the garage.
     
  6. FenderLover

    FenderLover Friend of Leo's

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    I use a propane heater for the garage too. I think the thing is to circulate the air for best heating. The heat goes pretty much straight up (chimney type heater), so I leave the heater below a bench with a fan running. The thing with the propane heaters is that they burn all the oxygen in the room and your eyes start to burn if the space is sealed up. Best to have some fresh air intake for combustion. I learned to crack the back door and move the heater and fan next to it.
     
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  7. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I was going to suggest a portable propane heater but I think radiant propane heaters are for outdoor use. Personally I shy away from taking a chance on asphyxiation

    I have a 220 wall heater with blower in the basement if you investigate what it takes to put 220 in. I think it's a matter of tying in a couple 115 v lines in your box and having the correct wire size and breakers. It wasn't too expensive from what I recall.

    This kind of thing. It has a thermostat so you can dial in the level of heat you like and it'll cycle on or off.

    https://www.globalindustrial.com/p/...MIxNj7l83y3gIVR-DICh3SdwHIEAQYBCABEgJWIvD_BwE

    We are in an all electric house and that is pricy to heat so years ago we had a nice propane gas stove put in. That heats a good portion of our ranch house. It's vented outside and not a cheapie though:

    https://energy-house.com/product/tree-of-life-gs1-2009-to-2012/
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2018
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  8. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have an old fireplace insert I use like a free standing wood stove. It has a built in fan and will heat the garage pretty darn fast once you get it going. But cutting wood, splitting, kindling etc are a PITA. If I did it again I would just get a propane free standing stove kinda like a wood stove. Propane is cheap, clean, no chopping etc.
    For minimal expense get one of those propane radiant heaters that go right on a small propane bottle. They put out well. Dont get one of the tubular propane blowers, they heat real fast but are too noisy to think!
    Yes:
    https://www.wayfair.com/outdoor/hd0...lQdPnDHMLgYcyhtSvDCuTt2Kyjs8xMLBoCMqAQAvD_BwE
    NO:
    https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200178724_200178724?cm_mmc=Google-pla&utm_source=Google_PLA&utm_medium=Heaters & Stoves + Fireplaces > Propane Heaters&utm_campaign=Mr. Heater&utm_content=174338&gclid=CjwKCAiA0O7fBRASEiwAYI9QAigLqfeOJKxFdktua5eU6rauYPEVbRLt7OgSa3-o0BuAN2CUTwH0HxoC5pMQAvD_BwE
    Even Better YES:

    https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_5840_5840?
    cm_mmc=Google-pla&utm_source=Google_PLA&utm_medium=Heaters%20%26%20Stoves%20%2B%20Fireplaces%20%3E%20Propane%20Heaters%20%3E%20Propane%20Garage%20Heaters&utm_campaign=Mr.%20Heater&utm_content=17352&gclid=CjwKCAiA0O7fBRASEiwAYI9QAoJAoMUTXCtVNWJy_kMfL5Fx3UK_-em9vYFhBq97KDgPo-vFYWoQghoCv8IQAvD_BwE
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2018
  9. Bugeater281

    Bugeater281 Tele-Meister

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    It’s a small cedar garage and I do plan on insulating, already have foam. However I need to run a new circuit to the garage since currently it is not up too code and is piggybacked off my kitchen. I’m planning on running a new 8-3 wire underground to the garage which would support 220v. I was just curious of pros and cons, I heard gas is actually cheaper to run. But open flames in a room with sawdust seems like a bad idea. But I also hear electrics don’t heat well. I should also mention the fusebox in the house to the garage is around 10-15ft. And the gas line is about 5-6 foot to reach the garage. So both option would be fairly easy to do
     
  10. jsnwhite619

    jsnwhite619 Friend of Leo's

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    Electric oil-filled radiator heater, 300-900 watts I think. I do a lot of finishing work, so open flames and mineral spirits/polyurethane fumes don't mix. Well, they do, but only if you want to pass out on the concrete.
     
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  11. eallen

    eallen Tele-Afflicted

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    I have a fully insulated garage which helps greatly. I have a natural gas vent free heater I run as desired. I cut back to minimal finish work in the winter so I don't need it as warm. I am personally fine in the mid-upper 50s for wood work and my shop never gets much below until it gets pretty cold out.
     
  12. ftbtx

    ftbtx Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    Maybe try a pellet heater? Compact and lots of heat.
     
  13. darren7

    darren7 Tele-Holic

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    You can use a parabolic infrared heater to heat yourself and your immediate surroundings, but heating all of the air in a large, uninsulated space (and keeping it heated) is going to be very expensive.
     
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  14. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Electric heat ( baseboard) is very even feeling unlike a furnace and blower system. Brother in law had a pellet stove in his old farmhouse. Really hot. My father in law had a woodburning fireplace in his basement. Too freaking hot.. You'd go to sleep and have to open windows. Cheap heat isn't ideal from what I've seen.
     
  15. Commodore 64

    Commodore 64 Friend of Leo's

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    I have an uninsulated, single-car, detached garage. I use a kerosene heater. On a really, really cold day, I gotta run the heater for a couple hours to even have it tolerable in there. On a standard day in the 30s, I can sit out there in with the heater on in a sweatshirt and maybe stocking hat. I've built many amps this way.

    Just the plane jane 24k BTU: https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200664955_200664955

    Sometimes I hang a tarp to cut the garage space (staple a 2x4 to the bottom, and roll it up [or just leave it down all winter) in half, helps keep the heat in a little bit.

    PS: I cut a man(or woman)door in the side of the garage so I wouldn't have to open the whole big garage door front every time.
     
  16. drumtime

    drumtime Tele-Meister

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    Maybe a little more $$ to install, but I like ductless minisplits for small buildings. I have two in different buildings, and they're great. Heat and AC, and very efficient - relatively cheap to run, compared to propane for instance. I did the install myself, and had the AC dude come out for $100 and release the freon or whatever it is these days. Total cost for my 450 square foot studio was about $900, and totally worth it. Warm in the winter, cool in the summer - Makes the studio the most comfortable space we have. If you spend a lot of time in your workshop/garage, I'd insulate and get a minisplit.
     
  17. LeftFinger

    LeftFinger Friend of Leo's

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    I have a fully insulated shop with a counter flow gas furnace from a mobile home. In the summer I use a window shaker to cool the big part.

    The old story was if you use wood heat in a carpentry shop
    You never have any mistakes lying around :lol:
     
  18. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    Buy a few ASIC Bitcoin Miners -- heat your space and earn coin too!

    They run about 1300 watts, kick air out the back that's 75-80 degrees. Just need to figure out how many you need to heat your space comfortably.

    Run them now, when bitcoin prices go back up, profit!

    .
     
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  19. telestratosonic

    telestratosonic Tele-Afflicted

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    We just installed a Williams 35,000 BTU natural gas free standing space heater (Model 3502522A) in a 15'x15' room (225 sq. ft.) that was an addition to the house we bought last year. It has a glass front and when fired up, it looks as if there's a wood fire burning. Pretty slick. www.williamscomfortprod.com. The unit is made in the USA (California). It can be vented up through the ceiling or out the wall and up the outside of the house. We went with the outside option. Way simpler. If you have a question, the Williams people are easily accessible by phone and are very helpful.

    The floor is insulated and there's a 12" unheated crawl space under it. The walls are of 2x6 construction and are insulated. The shed roof is 2x8 construction and is insulated as well. I installed a blower on the space heater (hi-off-lo) and it moves the air around the room to warm it up. The blower needs a 110 outlet to plug into. I also use an Ecofan UltrAir fan which sits atop the stove if I don't want to turn on the blower. It works off the heat from the space heater. It's like having a wood stove without the hassle of wood. Natural gas is really cheap up here. I'm on the prairies in Alberta and don't have ready access to wood. If I did, I'd be burning wood. But this space heater really heats up the room quickly.
     
  20. Milspec

    Milspec Friend of Leo's

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    Unless you use it daily, you just need a heater on occassion. A kerosene forced air heater is all that you need. I have a 3 car detached garage and a 75,000 btu kerosene construction heater can take it from 22 degrees to 70 in about 30 minutes. My garage has insulated walls, but I never got around to insulating anything else. Just choose one with an electric start and thermastat and you will be good. Cost isn't bad either as kerosene isn't bad and usage is minimal.
     
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