Heartbreaking mistake-- need to remove a fretboard

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by ppg677, Apr 19, 2019.

  1. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

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    I agree with Jupiter and a couple of others - measure the distance from the fret board side of the nut to the CENTER of the 12th fret, and place the bridge accordingly, the same distance from the 12th fret. That's the new scale. In the grand scheme of things - crank it up and no one will hear the difference.
     
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  2. eallen

    eallen Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    My preferred method of fretboard removal on a tele/strat style flat neck is to jerk the frets, put in in my support jig, and run it through the plainer until the board is gone. When it gets close I run a utility knife down each side of the truss rod route and remove it to avoid chipping a planer knife.

    It won't work on most glue on or angle head stock necks but saves from chipping out a piece of neck while prying around. Plus the surface is good and flat for glue on. [​IMG][​IMG]

    Eric
     
  3. ppg677

    ppg677 Tele-Meister

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    So with a 25.58" scale, every fret lines up as near as I can tell except for the first fret which is perhaps 0.018" off. Which means the string length when fretted at the first fret is about 24.126" instead of 24.144".

    One idea is to yank that single fret, fill it in somehow and recut that slot. And I think the fret would cover up the old slot so it wouldn't even be visible.

    In any case, I think I'll temporarily mount the neck and bridge to a 2x4" and see how it sounds.
     
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  4. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's Vendor Member

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    Great idea. I bet it'll be fine. Given that this is allegedly how the frets ought to be if every one of them was to be "right", I doubt your 0.018" will be too significant, but yeah, you can pull it and move it if needed.
    True Temperament Frets.png
     
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  5. Itchyfeet1000

    Itchyfeet1000 Tele-Meister

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    I suspect by the time you adjust for optimum intonation you won't even notice the discrepancy.

    Your little booboo is minor compared the mine when I was building my Ric-a-like 12 string. I completed the build and couldn't puzzle out why I couldn't get the intonation set. it was only when I went right back to basics that I realised I'd mounted the tune-o-matic bridge at 25" rather than 25.5" I had to make a plate to cover the holes where the bridge originally sat and re-drill. Fortunately a scrap of dark brown tort pickguard matched well with the burr walnut. It's not a clean look but at least it plays well now.

    IMG_20190403_014509.jpg
     
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  6. Maricopa

    Maricopa Friend of Leo's

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    Printers, even high quality ones, don't print 100% to scale. They tend to stretch things in one direction. You need a plotter to do accurate stuff like that.
    Just buy a fret scale from Stew-Mac or a slotted fretboards and use it to make a pattern.
     
    John Nicholas likes this.
  7. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    You can also just use the stewmac fret calculator, a machinist's 6" ruler, and a try square to lay out fret marks. It won't take that long. Put masking tape down on rosewood, or draw right on the maple. Use a sharp pencil.
     
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  8. Mad Kiwi

    Mad Kiwi Friend of Leo's

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    If that was my "mistake" I would be very proud.....unreal. congrats.
     
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  9. tonyj

    tonyj Tele-Afflicted

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    Hey ppg667, you will now have reached the next level in your ability to build fine guitars.

    By sharing your dilemma with the fine people who support this forum, you will have expanded your own knowledge as well as allowing the rest of us to learn a few things.

    Good luck with this guitar. I'm looking forward to the seeing how it goes, and I'm sure the results will be positive.

    Keep up the good work, and keep us informed.
     
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  10. ppg677

    ppg677 Tele-Meister

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    It's no good. I tuned to E and set intonation. Using the VocalPitchMonitor Android app on my phone.

    First fret is way off. Like fretting the first note is F# instead of F. The second fret is also off. Third and fourth slightly off. The rest seem fine. But gonna have to yank it.

    IMG_20190423_203013.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2019
  11. ppg677

    ppg677 Tele-Meister

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    And how does one use a flush trim router bit to trim the new fretboard? My neck already has quite the curve such that I don't think a bearing has anything to ride on. Hmm...

    IMG_20190423_210043.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2019
  12. ppg677

    ppg677 Tele-Meister

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    Call me strange, but with these jumbo frets and way too high temporary nut...if I fret with less pressure the low fret notes are way closer to where they should be. Huh.
     
  13. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

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    The too high nut is a serious complication for judging whether you are still within tolerances! From your description, that is exactly what happens when the nut is too high, even on a neck where the frets are in standard places...

    All may not be lost!
     
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  14. G.Rotten

    G.Rotten Tele-Holic

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    2012-07-05 13.23.39.jpg 2012-07-05 13.13.45.jpg 2012-07-05 13.23.33.jpg

    The heat softens the glue, then just work it off.

    On a different neck I just pulled the frets & ran the neck through the jointer until the fretboard was sawdust.

    It was faster & you'll have to joint it anyway after you get the board off.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2019
  15. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Try jamming a nail/chopstick under the string in front of the nut, reducing the distance from the string break point to fret 1 and re tune ... see if bringing the nut a few mm closer will improve the tuning at fr 1/2... :)
     
    noah330 likes this.
  16. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's Vendor Member

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    If you're sure it has to come off, you use the old fretboard as a template for the new one. Rout it to size off the guitar than glue it in place with some precise indexing brads.

    Or, just glue on the new board, and cut it close them finish it flush by hand, no power tools involved.
     
  17. philosofriend

    philosofriend Tele-Holic

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    I would get a metal ruler long enough to cover all the frets. Then I would measure the distance from the second fret to the 14th fret (because the nut and first fret look like some additional screw-up factor is involved). Twice that measurement gives the scale if you started at the second fret. Use the fret calculator to find the location of the tenth fret, using the shortened scale. (That would be the twelfth fret of the long scale you started making.) Subtract that from the (short) scale length to find the distance from the tenth fret (of the short scale) to the bridge. Double that and you will have the best estimate of the (long) scale that will make your board play in tune.

    Get the measurements for your newly calculated best long scale. Take your metal ruler and line the measurement of the second fret location with the actual second fret. See if the higher frets are a good match. If they are, then see if the first fret and nut are as messed up as they appear to be, decide to fix them.

    I watched a guy lay out the fret locations once with a magnifier, a pin-point awl and a metal ruler. He told me that if I accidentally caused the ruler to fall on the floor I would have to give him $100 for a new one.

    It seems like every build has one thing that just plain takes a long time to fix. For us amateurs we think about it probably too much. I worked with a long-time Kalamazoo Gibson employee and he was remarkably relaxed about throwing a guitar away if the situation looked annoying and slow.
     
  18. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    If your fretboard is messed up, it'll be faster to make a new one than to replace the old one. I'd find the center line of the new fretboard and the centerline of the "old"neck. Then I'd clamp them together and do the brad location thing in new fret slot locations. From there, I'd rough cut the new fretboard oversize, glue it on, and scrape that to the old neck. Then you should be back in business. You can remove the old inlay and use it in another neck down the road. You'll be out the cost of the fretboard and your time. If you think that the frets are off on number 1, start again fresh with #2, and double check by measuring many of the fret spaces with a 6" machinist scale.

    Sometimes stuff like this happens. Many of us have a bin full of bad parts and know the feeling.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2019
  19. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    My box of shame overfloweth..
     
  20. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    If I have one more bad maple tele neck I can build a table out of them.
     
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