Hay for the Horses--> and thoughts on heroes...

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by getbent, Sep 3, 2019.

  1. unixfish

    unixfish Poster Extraordinaire

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    Nope. Just "standard" bales; 18 x 18 x 36. Stil, they are around 25 or 30 lbs each. One job I use to do was load them onto the elevator so someone could stack them in the loft. You know how many bales fit on a hay wagon, and we would do two or three wagons a night.

    Sometimes I still miss the hard manual labor. Mostly not.
     
  2. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    I hear you! I miss the neighborly comraderie when rain is predicted. Everyone goes to get the hay in around the "farmerhood". All day. We didnt have elevators then, toss them onto an, often moving, 4 wheel trailer. At about 3pm the women have made up fried chicken dinner outside. Then back to work. Good times, even though they nearly kill you. I hated it when I heard they were buying alfalfa hay, I dont know how they made those solid heavy bales...

    Prior to that we brought hay in on a truck from the field unbaled. Big tackle and hook powered by the side output on a John Deere, Hook drops down onto the truck load, when you lift it pulls shut and grasps a big ball of hay. Then up to the barn top, and it cliks on the ridge rail and slides to the back of the barn. Jerk the tail rope and it releases the hay. repeat as necessary!
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2019
  3. telleutelleme

    telleutelleme Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I lived in an apartment next to a Bandido MC member in the early 70's. He was always in colors. I use to sit out by the pool partaking of a smoke and watch him walk his toy poodle around the apartment complex. He always nodded to me as he walked by. I wanted to ask him why he had a toy poodle but couldn't figure out how to enter into the conversation. I think it would probably have been something simple like it was his old lady's or he just liked poodles. I would surely have been disappointed. My imagination however was amazingly satisfied watching a full on biker walk a toy poodle.
     
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  4. P Thought

    P Thought Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Reading poetry aloud is a skill separate from writing it. I keep meaning to read Gary Snyder more seriously.
     
  5. getbent

    getbent Telefied Ad Free Member

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    here is another favorite for you my friend!


    Soy Sauce
    Standing on a stepladder
    up under hot ceiling
    tacking on wire net for plaster,
    a day's work helping Bruce and Holly on their house,
    I catch a sour salt smell and come back
    down the ladder.

    "Deer lick it nights" she says,
    and shows me the frame of the window she's planing,
    clear redwood, but dark, with a smell.

    "Scored a broken-up, two-thousand-gallon redwood
    soy sauce tank from a company went out of business
    down near San Jose."

    Out in the yard the staves are stacked:
    I lean over, sniff them, ah! it's like Shinshu miso,
    the darker saltier miso paste of the Nagano
    uplands, central main island, Japan–
    it's like Shinshu pickles!

    I see in mind my friend Shimizu Yasushi and me,
    one October years ago, trudging through days of snow
    crossing the Japan Alps and descending
    the last night, to a farmhouse,
    taking a late hot bath in the dark–and eating
    a bowl of chill miso radish pickles,
    nothing ever so good!

    Back here, hot summer sunshine in dusty yard,
    hammer in hand.
    But I know how it tastes
    to lick those window frames
    in the dark,
    the deer.
     
  6. stanger

    stanger Tele-Meister

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    I did some hay bucking in my youth, but I avoided it becoming my way of life.

    I've also known some famous people too. I'm not one who gets star struck, so that could be the reason why I got along with most of them just fine. The others were people I probably wouldn't have liked even if they weren't famous.

    One thing I noticed is fame brought them all an amount a cautious reserve everyday folks don't have. None of my first meetings with any of them were surprise visits or an unexpected deliberate encounter, but in general, the better known they were, the more stand-offish they were at first.
    At least, that was true for the actors, writers, and artists. The musicians were often really happy to be recognized most often, especially if they weren't up at the top of the Top 40, and as long as some stranger was respectably polite, the musicians were happy to have a little chat with them.

    I was working overtime at Gibson one Saturday morning when Marty Stuart showed up and got a factory tour. There really wasn't much action to see in the factory, as a couple of us were the only ones there, but Marty was so tickled I recognized him and mentioned how much I like his new album, he talked to me for about an hour, really excited and pleased.

    Gave me his phone number and told me to look him up if I ever came to Nashville. I never did, or called him, but he's the biggest standout famous guy in my memory.
    In everyday life, most of the movie stars I've met aren't really all that interesting. Or glamorous. The writers tended to be either gracious or grumps.

    Marty and I were just two Joes who liked to play the same kind of music, and I don't think his fame changed him much at all.
    He's also a really good story teller. Even the boss, who just stood there and listened, loved his lyrical way with words. (and he never said a word about an empty extra hour's worth of overtime for me, either)

    Thanks for this thread, GB. It's a good one!
    regards,
    stanger
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2019
  7. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Maybe it's just statistics, man: There are only a few people that I care for as people, and only a few artists that I can possibly "admire most", so maybe it's natural that the subset of "most admired artists that I care for as people" is extremely small.
     
  8. mrbdxmpl

    mrbdxmpl Tele-Meister

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    getbent - your post immediately caught my eye - "Hay for the Horses" hangs on my bedroom mirror, along with some postcards, mementos of a few good trips, and a diverse collection of snippets by other favorite writers and artists - the photographer Robert Adams, Warren Zevon, Stephen Bodio. Gary's (OK, Mr. Snyder's) poem is especially poignant to me because it was sent by a good friend and ex-girlfriend, who taught me to ride and be around horses, and it allows me to imagine a particular rural existence that I never had (born and raised in the San Fernando Valley) but that I still somehow long for...

    I have also spent the last 30 years as a museum curator, and have had the pleasure of meeting almost every artist I admire in my field. Most are pretty good folks. A few - a small percentage - a dicks. Some are difficult - it comes with the territory. And many of them are truly lovely in one way or another, and I am privileged to call them friends. So, with that experience in mind, one thing I might say about the reading is that he was 80 at the time...I haven't met Mr. Snyder, and I was surprised at his easy demeanor, but he had also been a hard core, intense, serious scholar, poet, teacher, outdoorsman for 60+ years by the time he read that poem. You can't always run flat out. Maybe he was a little cool that evening. Maybe at 80, his flame runs a little lower. At the end of the day, however, he is still a Top Ten American Badass!

    Just a comment, not an argument!!
     
  9. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    My hero is not known for his poems, but nevertheless he did write some great ones: IMG_4076.JPG
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2019
  10. Harry Styron

    Harry Styron Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    My impression of highly skilled artists—whether painters, sculptors, poets, or musicians—is their concentration on craft. They are really good at sharpening their pencils, cleaning their brushes, and preparing their blank surfaces.

    In dealing with the public, as Stanger pointed out, those who are famous may be a little guarded. So are the rest of us, on those rare occasions that strangers act interested in us. Like us, the famous ones labored in obscurity for years. They weren’t studying public relations.
     
  11. getbent

    getbent Telefied Ad Free Member

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    all good points and probably likely true... I have been a snyder fan since the 70's and have seen him read several times (and play guitar and sing) and I was a friendly acquaintance of wendell berry and guy davenport when I lived in Ky so, had a connection there as well.

    Only a couple of times in my life have I been 'oh wow, this is something'... most of the time it is just 'they are a person who makes cool stuff.' Maybe this thread is mostly about my ambivalence toward both snyder and my favorite folk singer who I knew pretty well (invited to be in the front row/family row at his funeral) and knew both his his humanity and humanness (if that is delicate enough)....

    In my regular life, I do really well with difficult people. Over the years, I have worked with, for and managed some folks who were both geniuses and afflicted with all manner of stuff that made people not be able to tolerate them... and brilliant, driven personalities that mean no harm, but are bulls in a china shop in interpersonal interactions.... and I have thrived with them... taking them as they come....

    But with Gary (and the folk singer) I read them so closely (and EVERYTHING THEY WROTE) that their 'written self' far outstripped their actual actions.... as if their writing was their superego and the rest rolled out (as expected as a human) but in a measure that made me cringe.

    Stanger, thanks for your post too.... I have had similar experiences... I guess it is a little like when you see a girl who SHOULD be perfect for you and you even have it all figured out... only to find out that they aren't who you thought she'd be and maybe you aren't either... I dunno... I have the poems and the songs... (btw, Wendell Berry, Harry Caudill, Guy Davenport were all AMAZING people who I admired and adored. I was a young man in a foreign land and learning their world and they were gracious and while known for 'challenging' interactions, I dug them.)
     
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  12. getbent

    getbent Telefied Ad Free Member

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    very cool.... sometime I will share my experience having hunter thompson come onstage at the woody creek tavern to help us sing Take it Easy... I believe the kentucky boy may have had a nip or two that night.... great time though..
     
  13. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Wow, now there is a person I would have loved to sit down and have a conversation with. Better yet, with you @getbent at the same table too.
     
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  14. P Thought

    P Thought Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Noice, that Snyder. The Edward Abbey too. He's a STUD. Well anyway he was.
     
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  15. P Thought

    P Thought Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I don't think this is too uncommon. That's kind of what serious writing is about. . . ?
     
  16. stanger

    stanger Tele-Meister

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    Ed Abbey was a legend down in those sandstone deserts in Utah & Arizona.
    When I was much younger, I spent some time down there off and on, and I once spotted him in Fredonia, Arizona. I really didn't meet him- just saw him having breakfast in a Mexican joint there.

    His favorite SUV to go cruising in the desert was a huge, really beat-up, red Buick Special convertible with an enormous engine. The back seat was full of trash, beer cans, and old pieces of roadkill (or something that looked like it).
    regards,
    stanger
     
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  17. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    most of the artists I know are small businessmen

    they have to hustle

    it's been rare that we actually talk about art, and when we do, it's either about technique or about what a fraud or chiseler some other artist is

    the ones I know are only happy when they're working or eating -- and they're REALLY happy when you're paying
     
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  18. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    Thanks for the post. On occasion poetry hits me like the times I realize I should read more history books.

    Burning Man and "just showed up" in the thread sent me on a tangent.

    Some acquaintances actually made it big in entertainment and I went to a university that was legendary for some events and parties. That made me wish an showing up at Burning Man would be a Bewitched nose twitch to quickly get there, look around and leave.

    On just showing up, I had a few experiences being with stars or celebrities where I was glad it happened but also glad I kept my cool. This includes Hunter S Thompson, happening on Grateful Dead members north of San Francisco, special tickets to a Rolling Stones concert, and a decade when a famous park and resort area sort of a second home. As dumb and as talkative as I can be, again, I was glad I mostly shut up and took it in. Some asked why I don't have autographs and such, but it was cool to just be.

    All the time I spent in the Tetons and a Caribbean location left me more and more disappointed in many celebrities and well known people. That was learning many are or were not as great as their art or work when you hoped it would be the opposite.

    I guess that's a variation of shouting get off my lawn. It took age to realize I was more impressed with the art than the people.
     
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  19. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I can take the artist being less than the art or even indifferent to their own work but, mean to the help ? That’s always the straw for me and I’ve seen it countless times. I think it’s much more rare with those that have risen from low work and have actually experienced the seeming inescapable monotony of being poor.
     
  20. nvilletele

    nvilletele Friend of Leo's

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    I expect all fans of Snyder may (should?) know this already, but in case some do not: Japhy Ryder, one of the two main characters in Kerouac’s “Dharma Bums” was based on Gary Snyder.

    I always liked Dharma Bums even better than On the Road. Give it a read if you haven’t read it before. Or, like me, go and read it again now . . .
     
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