Has HOW We Consume Music Destroyed It?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by 4pickupguy, Sep 25, 2019.

  1. Twang Deluxe

    Twang Deluxe Tele-Meister

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    In the 90s I spent a lot of money for albums with just one good track.

    I only bought records from bands that were played on MTV and on the radio

    Thanks to youtube I discovered so many unknown bands from the 60s and 70s.

    I'm happy to live in the 2010s
     
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  2. CK Dexter Haven

    CK Dexter Haven Friend of Leo's

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    Classical albums were great for telling you what gear was used. The Mercury recordings of the Eastman Wind Ensemble were crazy detailed down to what head was used on the mastering lathe.
     
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  3. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Friend of Leo's

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    Yep. Black T-shirts collect Chihuahua 'glitter'.
     
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  4. Mick Sullivan

    Mick Sullivan TDPRI Member

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    There are positives. I pay £10 a month for an Apple Music subscription. It’s allowed me to amass and digest an album collection that would not have been affordable or even sometimes accessible for me prior to music subscription services.

    And the use of YouTube as both a source for music and as a musical educational tool is a godsend.
     
  5. studio1087

    studio1087 Telefied Silver Supporter

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    I think I'm part of the problem.

    Our family of 5 has the Apple sharing plan. For $12 per month we have access to everything on iTunes. The only time that I "buy" a CD is when I hear a great band in a club and they have a merch table.

    I have about 600 albums virtually stored in my phone and I haven't truly "bought" one of them.

    I have an Amazon Echo unit in my office, bedroom, great room and in my studio. The one in the studio is hooked up to my PA. When I'm learning cover tunes for the band I simply ask Alexa to play the song. I haven't bought a song on my phone for the band's sake in years.

    I'll pay $120 for a great seat to see a band live but as far as paying for recorded music is concerned I must be part of the problem.

    The times they are a changing. I've embraced the technology.
     
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  6. 4pickupguy

    4pickupguy Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I should add. I do not own a vinyl record player. I listen to all my music digitally. The tattered vinyl records I listened to as a kid now adorn my studio walls like forgotten portraits. I do still listen to music in a quiet room start finish as if it were still on the old Marantz. I listened to Tres Hombres the other day through the monitors start to finish and pulled the tattered LP out of its frame. That liner photo still makes me hungry.

    B9170171-3CC8-456E-BC13-77B9ACA8688F.jpeg

    I completely failed to communicate or express the concept I was after for the thread. I can see now how it became a “vinyl was better than today’s newfangled gobbletyguk, *shakes fist at cloud” kind of discussion. A collection of songs and material (which happen to include liner notes, pictures of Mexican food whatever) being greater than the sum of its parts, enjoyed in a way not unlike quietly reading a book, was missing. I still think there is value in it even if I’m alone on this one. MP3s are individually tossed into the raging info river and that’s how we listen to them.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2019
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  7. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I’m sure everyone here has seen the Tower Records documentary. One of the people they interview said that they felt so lucky to have been right in the center of the music business at its commercial apex.

    There’s no “normal” or “regular” - there’s just what is “normal” or “regular” for a period of time.

    The album era and the “The record company gave us $200,000 to make a record and we’re still trying to pay it back” era lasted for a little bit and then it was over.

    Make no mistake, the record companies destroyed the record business* . And, as others have said, we the listeners are reaping all the rewards of that.


    *by having not a clue how to react quickly and successfully to Napster/file sharing. Among other things ! :lol:
     
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  8. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    4B12B21F-B931-4869-906A-06026E32E96D.jpeg

    Great minds think alike !
     

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  9. codamedia

    codamedia Friend of Leo's

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    ^^^^ This ^^^^
    Note the moderators... we need an "applause" emoticon :D
     
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  10. GuitarKid

    GuitarKid Tele-Holic

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    It seems to me that every big artist these days is a fabrication, and made to play only within the safe boundaries that are pre-determined by those who select and turn them into big stars. It's become a safe game to them and they can't lose. They decided somewhere along the way that it was dangerous, for multiple reasons, to allow really creative, deep and powerful people to make the music they wanted to do.
     
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  11. Cerb

    Cerb Tele-Meister

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    So in other words; same as always...
     
  12. ElJay370

    ElJay370 Tele-Holic

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    Destroyed music? No.

    Altered it? Obviously.

    The delivery systems have changed, but art is art and those who seek to be creative will use the currently available mediums to be creative within.

    The 45 minute vinyl LP with liner notes and artwork was the preferred medium 40 years ago. That's no longer the case. Whether or not that format was "better" or offered a more satisfying musical experience is purely subjective.

    I would agree that most modern music is mixed and over compressed in order for it to sound good in your car or through cheap earbuds. but that's how the majority of consumers listen to music now. Nobody has big speakers and tube driven stereo amplifiers in their homes anymore. But as far as the quality of the music itself, I don't think that's suffered at all...In fact it's freed up the artist's creativity in ways that didn't exist before. You can produce high quality recordings very cheaply and distribute them digitally on your own. The major record labels with their huge recording budgets and monopolized distribution systems have been rendered irrelevant. It's never been easier to do your music the way you want and get it out to an audience.

    Is the market flooded with music that sucks? Sure, but it always has been. If you care about good music, you'll seek out those who care about making good music.

    My listening habits have certainly changed, but how I choose which music to explore hasn't. When I hear something I like, my first question is "What do their other tunes sound like?" I have a tendency to purchase entire albums instead of just a song or two...which I guess is an old habit carried over from the LP/CD days. If you can't give me 8 to 10 good songs, you're not worth my time.

    Thing is, I'm an adult who is over 40, and the way I consume music and the role it plays in my daily life are different from the demographic that most new music is aimed at.
     
  13. Jhengsman

    Jhengsman Tele-Holic

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    Back in the mid 70s songs started being longer than one side of a 45 single and we had to buy the album to get the song. By the time CDs were getting in our hands we couldn't even be assured that the album had the song we wanted and there wasn't a remix that radio played
     
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  14. tlsmack

    tlsmack Tele-Afflicted

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    Remeber saving all your allowance and Raking leaves to get a Marantz receiver with the big fly wheel tuner? Confirmation money towards some Advent speakers or a Technics turn table? Now overly compressed files through microspoc headphones is how most people listen to music. Is that progress? Now get off my lawn.
     
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  15. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    No. You can't kill music.
     
  16. 4pickupguy

    4pickupguy Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I appreciate everyone whose chimed in on this subject. It’s been pretty enlightening. Some great observations and information.

    That said,

    I think (for me personally) this is just about the most depressing thread I have ever seen on TDPRI.

    Tonight, I’m going drink some beer and listen to Two Against Nature...
     
  17. GuitarKid

    GuitarKid Tele-Holic

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    I don't see anything as powerful as The Who, Cream, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Queen, etc etc, making it big these days.
     
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  18. Cerb

    Cerb Tele-Meister

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    Powerful is subjective.

    What I meant is that the music always had to be deemed commercially viable or the record lables wouldn't have signed the artists. Complete creative freedom never existed.
     
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  19. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Friend of Leo's

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    What? You don't like Imagine Dragons and Florida-Georgia Line and, of course, Lil Nas X?

     
  20. Skydog1010

    Skydog1010 Tele-Afflicted Platinum Supporter

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    Downside to YouTube is the distractions they throw at you. Not that I don't spend 99% of my time there, I miss the media, the album's in particular, the sections of music types, the categories of artists. I've gotten lazy and don't dig through the bins of cassettes or CDs anymore.
     
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