Hammer one/pull offs while creating licks in scales

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by Mission6_OG, Aug 1, 2021.

  1. Mission6_OG

    Mission6_OG Tele-Meister

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    So this maybe one of those “no real answer” type of questions. But this kind of pertains to speed inside of smoothness?

    So if I’m improvising it creating licks, let’s say while playing this using a pentatonic scale, whether minor or major, is it common to hammer on/pull off in half steps? Does this make sense in what I’m asking?

    Lets say I’m in A minor, position 1. And my index finger, or 1 finger, is on the D note. I pick that string and hammer on pull off using the D, D#, and E notes. Instead of just D and E. I’d that Something that is common practice? Or is it play it by ear and see if it sounds right kind of thing?
     
  2. Leon Grizzard

    Leon Grizzard Friend of Leo's

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    Yes – that is a common thing to do. A lot of players think in order for it to sound like you’re a good player, you have to pick every note but it just ain’t so. Hammers and pulls can add to smooth phrasing, or rich, expressive phrasing, and let you play stuff you might not be able to.

    And your specific example of chromatically connecting the D snd the E is very common, whether you pick it or slur it.

    I remember seeing an interview with some top-notch Bluegrass flatpicker, he said that it may sound like he’s picking every note but in fact there were a lot of hammer ons and pull offs in there. And that is true with Tele-gods like Albert Lee.
     
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  3. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Silver Supporter

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    I have a couple warm-up scale runs that include both hammer ons and pull offs. I like to include sliding into a scale note as well. Not sure how much this helps me with songwriting/lick development, but I have always thought that I should remind myself daily of these techniques in a scale perspective. I’m glad you mention it though, because I probably do them without even thinking anymore, so this reminder will insure that I make a fresh mental note of them. Thanks.
     
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  4. Mission6_OG

    Mission6_OG Tele-Meister

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    I guess to be a little more specific is let’s say how a scale will go in whole, whole, whole and a half. Now I’m playing a lick and part of this lick I hammer on pull off in half steps to make up the whole step or whole and a half. Using 3-4 notes that normally would be 2 notes.
     
  5. Mission6_OG

    Mission6_OG Tele-Meister

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    I do
    Understand what you guys are saying however. And definitely benefit from your replies for sure.
     
  6. NoTeleBob

    NoTeleBob Tele-Afflicted

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    I think it's a slightly different sound... which sometimes matters, sometimes not. I think in slower moves where you're trying to emphasize a walk down or up, etc, picking is the way to go. But if you're doing sort of a chromatic roll up/down into a chord, the hammer on/off is better.
     
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  7. JL_LI

    JL_LI Poster Extraordinaire

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    Hammer ons, pull offs, and slurs are all valid techniques available to guitarists. I can’t say I try all of them when working on a particular solo but when I have an idea, my brain knows how to play it. And my brain tells me to try a different technique if something sounds off.
     
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  8. NoTeleBob

    NoTeleBob Tele-Afflicted

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    If I understand what you are saying, you're just making a move up or down more chromatic. It will work sonic-ally sometimes and not others. Usually I find out of scale notes (assuming you're talking out of scale) are OK to fill in with, but don't play too many in a row or too often. If it sounds good, do it.
     
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  9. tfarny

    tfarny Poster Extraordinaire

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    The scales are more like guideposts than rules. Play any note you want, but if it’s not in the box it might sound pretty bad. Or cool...
     
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  10. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    In an A blues, the chromatic space between D and E, has a bazillion microtones in it. Some of those notes and microtones have some really cool uses in a lot of music.

    I think everything else in your post concerns some techniques to achieve that and more. Blues is such a feel-oriented sound, that the sky is the limit for developing technique for that. You also have free reign to adopt some more personal ways of goosing a note.
     
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  11. Mission6_OG

    Mission6_OG Tele-Meister

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    EXACTLY what I was getting at. LOL! I didn’t know exactky how to word it. Basically, if it’s right for what I’m going for, then it’s right. If not...we’ll...it’s not. Just depends on what I’m trying to do/play over/write if it works or not.
     
  12. Mission6_OG

    Mission6_OG Tele-Meister

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    Thanks a ton everybody! Even through asking this pretty basic question, you get a bunch of really good input from you guys and in turn, a few more ideas/motivation. You all have been a tremendous help.
     
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  13. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Clapton does this a lot, little trills here and there. Jerry Garcia uses chromatic runs constantly, sometimes across two octaves. He has a knack for getting them to end up in just the right place.
     
  14. Rockinvet

    Rockinvet Tele-Afflicted

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    Another good spot to add a double chromatic hammer on in A pentatonic is from E to G use first finger then hammer all fingers up to the G. Even A to C, also anywhere there’s a whole step as long as it’s used in passing or you hit a clam!
     
  15. LOSTVENTURE

    LOSTVENTURE Friend of Leo's

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    It's very refreshing to hear the term "slur" used correctly/ Takes me back to the 60's.
     
  16. LOSTVENTURE

    LOSTVENTURE Friend of Leo's

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    During the creation of a solo, I seldon design slurs into the phrasing. But during any resulting performances, I alway find myself adding them to the mix. It just seems to make the actual performance flow more naturally.
    And I seldom let the scale get into the way of getting to where I want to go. Lots of accidentals along the path.
     
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