Guitar Trade

Discussion in 'Other T-Types and Partscasters' started by Hpilotman, Jul 30, 2021.

  1. Hpilotman

    Hpilotman Tele-Holic

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  2. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    Reverends are fantastic. They arrive with a great setup. Go Zeke!
     
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  3. Fendereedo

    Fendereedo Poster Extraordinaire

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    Nice looking Reverend. If you're happy, and I would be, then that's where it counts. Hngd.
     
  4. horax

    horax Tele-Afflicted

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    How would you compare the playability, feel, and quality of the two?

    I like the reverends but nobody has one nearby
     
  5. Tenderfoot

    Tenderfoot Tele-Afflicted

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    Strat for a Tele? Seems logical trade to me:) Of course nothing against Strat players, it just boils down to personal preference.

    Don't know if this is your first tele but, I'm sure you will find it a great guitar to play.

    Enjoy!
     
  6. Hpilotman

    Hpilotman Tele-Holic

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    After 3 days still with the honeymoon here is what I like better about the Reverend.

    1- 10-14 Compound Radius Neck. The Strat neck 9.5 R was good but I like the CR Neck better already and wishing all my Telecaster guitars had the 10-14 CR Neck.

    2- Sustain plugged in. Hit a 1st position E Chord and it just keeps ringing and ringing until I palm it. Once again the Strat was decent but no match for the chambered body Reverend.

    3- Pickups - Neck has more clarity that lots of OEM Telecaster pickups and Bridge has the great classic Telecaster twang. 4th option with pull pot [out of phase].

    4- Nice balance and fit and finish. The Strat also had a good feel and fit and finish.

    Overall 1-10 - I rate the Reverend Pete Anderson Eastsider T guitar 8.5-9.0
    Worth the $1000 at today's prices. I see them mostly listed for $1099. but mine was New and Priced at $999.

    I have never played a 10 guitar in my lifetime and probably won't. I use to deal in guitars and amps and owned and played many different models thru the years.[1990 -2005]

    I would rate the best Telecaster I ever played and held a 9.75 and it was a Tom Anderson T guitar in the late 1990's-early 2000 at a Texas Guitar Show.

    Hope this helps.
     
  7. Milspec

    Milspec Poster Extraordinaire

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    Never seen one in person and not sure how much of their design is strictly a marketing tool and which actually make for a better guitar. For example, I really have a hard time believing a 6 bolt neck plate would add anything of real value. If it did, why stop at 6 and not 8 or 12?

    I have dealt with Korina wood however and to me it just sounded like mahogany, so not sure if Korina is just a marketing tool as well.

    Don't get me wrong though, I would make that trade all day as an American Strat are a dime a dozen out there today and can be had for $800 quite often. You definitely got the better end of the deal.
     
  8. Hpilotman

    Hpilotman Tele-Holic

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    Ernie Ball uses 5 Bolt Neck on some of their models.
    Why stop at 12 and just go ahead and make it a neck thru body?
    I did not trade for the guitar because it had a 6 bolt neck but loved the feel of the compound radius and the tone of the guitar. I own a Telecaster with an Ash body and like it very much also. The playability and tone sold me over any marketing schemes.

    You are correct that Korina wood is a form of mahogany.

    Here is a quote from another source:

    "The mere mention of Korina wood in the same breath with a guitar makes many guitarists and collectors drool. It is, after all, the wood used to build some of the most legendary Gibsons of all time—the original Flying V and the Explorer. Guitar builders, however, usually have a totally different reaction; Korina tends to make them reach for the nearest bottle of aspirin in order to ward off the headaches working with it causes.

    Considered by most experts to be a “super mahogany” or “mahogany deluxe,” Korina wood bears a strong resemblance to mahogany in both tone and grain characteristics. Those same experts also agree that Korina has a sweeter midrange, with enhanced responsiveness, which would seemingly make it more desirable as a guitar-making wood. So why isn’t Korina—more commonly known as Limba—used more extensively to make guitars?

    “It’s a very good wood for guitars,” said Edwin Wilson, Historic Program Manager/Engineering at Gibson’s famed Custom Shop. “It’s typically lighter in weight than mahogany, and tonewise it’s a bit brighter. But mahogany is the accepted standard. It comes down to tradition.”
     
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  9. Smokin OP

    Smokin OP Tele-Afflicted

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    A win, IMO!
     
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