Guitar method books

Discussion in 'Other Guitars, other instruments' started by markblues, Aug 24, 2019.

  1. markblues

    markblues TDPRI Member

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    I'm currently considering writing a guitar method book. Does anyone have any opinions as to what is routinely missing? Or any other useful tips of what you'd like to see?

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  2. zeedoctour

    zeedoctour Tele-Meister

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    Lot's of instructional books have the "road-maps" that seek to visualize the theory they are trying to explain in words. The single perspective I find most lacking again and again and again (having played enough now to know what I'm about to say, as a beginner I did not have this experience and thus, understanding) is .... relating the lesson to making it work within the actual playing inside the framework of a song. In small chunks a beginner could take and work on as one little bit of a new idea, into a song structure immediately, before they lose patience to make it through what will always be a struggle, initially.

    Does that make sense ?
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2019
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  3. markblues

    markblues TDPRI Member

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    That's a really very helpful reply. Thanks for your time. I guess bite sized approach to playing a song...the different voices for example played apart and then together.

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  4. zeedoctour

    zeedoctour Tele-Meister

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    Yeah ... every song is made up of parts and sections.

    Usually as a whole way beyond the "make enough progress quickly enough to remain focused and positive about that progress" level they are at in the beginning. It's in the beginning where most are lost or form the self image of themselves as a guitar player that might remain with them for years, and hold them back if that self image wasn't a good one.

    I always feel (now that I have some experience and understanding of this musical thing we're all pursuing) ... that if a new player could take a piece of a song and relate the theory of the chords and the melody and the licks and the harmonic alternatives that would work in that little piece ... directly to his fingers on the fretboard and process the sequence of these parts relative to each other, in a chunk he could work over and over on and get a grip on fairly quickly ... then they would be better able to eventually take all the little pieces and get to the "complete song" level with greater confidence. Perhaps even grasping the reasons why some of the alternative harmonic ideas work.

    If I'd had that when I started out, my progress would have been a lot more positive and I'd maybe have reached a level of skill playing, that helped me to fuel even more progress. With a better self image than the really poor one I shouldered for about 10 or 20 years.

    I hope this is making sense.
     
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