guitar heater

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by s_tones, Dec 26, 2018.

  1. s_tones

    s_tones Tele-Holic

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    Addressing the problem of curing lacquer in these cool winter months.
    Being Calif, I can usually get a decent window of warmth and sun to spray lacquer but that lasts about 2 hrs in the afternoon and then it's too cold to cure the lacquer. And its too smelly and toxic to be indoors of course. Voila! The old water softener tub gets a new lease on life! This maintains a nice blanket of 85-90 deg air. (I cover the top with a piece of cardboard).

    Last coats on. Should be ready to wetsand/polish in a week or so.

    Steve




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  2. Greggorios

    Greggorios Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Great ingenuity. I love seeing old stuff like your water softener tank getting rehabbed. Please send pics when completed!
     
  3. teleman1

    teleman1 Tele-Afflicted

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    What planet are you from? That is his 2nd space module capsule. He never used it. Good to re- purpose.:rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2018
    Greggorios likes this.
  4. 2blue2

    2blue2 Friend of Leo's

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    The white thing with the nob set low, thats the heater?
    This guitar is super cool, thus the need for heat.


    Brings new meaning to ~Some hot guitar work
    then later you can take a bath in it.
     
  5. s_tones

    s_tones Tele-Holic

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    Yep. Got a little fan. Nice uniform temp. Figure the electricity costs be $5/day. 1000 watts. Basically a short circuit. Just need a couple days though I reckon
     
  6. HockeyPop98

    HockeyPop98 Tele-Holic

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    Great idea! I'm going another route, and decided to approach it though chemistry. Just ordered a product that cures when exposed to UV light. I have led and florescent uv lights laying around, and ordered this product from Solarez:

    https://www.solarez.com/product/i-cant-believe-its-not-lacquer-quart-only/



    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
     
  7. Sparky2

    Sparky2 Friend of Leo's

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    Steve,

    That is the coolest-looking guitar I have ever seen.

    And I have been playing and owning guitars for nearly 50 years.

    SO GOOD!!

    :)
     
  8. Tonetele

    Tonetele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Opposite problem Downunder where I live. Lucky if the nights get down to 22C ( 72F).
     
  9. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

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    Great Idea Steve and a superb guitar to test it.
     
  10. s_tones

    s_tones Tele-Holic

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    That solarez looks like it has real potential!
    I may try it too. Watching the video I do wonder how hard it is cuz it sanded off so easily. Some of the water based lacquers have been said to be too soft - easily dented.
    Sure worth a try though!
    Please post a threead with your results
    Steve
     
  11. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    FWIW this is a subject discussed extensively in "Finely Finished". BTW, that's a nice "warming " system. Can it be used during the whole process?

    Lacquer doesn't cure. It dries by evaporation of the solvents and other volatiles, which occurs (in manufacturer specified temperatures, which vary a bit ) in an hour or two. The common exceptions are Deft's lacquers, which are modified and dry very slowly, and brushing lacquers, waterbased lacquers (not to be confused with "acrylic lacquer" - which is usually the same thing as everyday, so-called "nitro" lacquers).

    To fit virtually every manufacturer's temperature requirements, ALL of these need to be inside that "temp range": the material; the item being coated; the ambient temperature during application AND drying.

    Many don't realize the material and guitar themselves need to be above 60 degrees or so. the material container - whether aerosol or bulk - can be soaked in a container of warm water and agitated every few minutes. Bulk material you can check with a common meat thermometer (if it goes that low); aerosols normally require a couple of hours in water not over 80-90 degrees F.

    AFTER coating is critical. "Cold dry" can cause all sorts of problems. If you can't maintain temp for at least 3-4 hours after coating (in case any areas are a bit too thick, common with those that don't do finish work that often - and almost all aerosol applications) you need to change the environment, wish for a whole bunch of luck, or wait for better weather.

    Much of this gets worked out during full practice application on scrap - from prep, sealing, filling to every regular lacquer coat to buffing. If you leave anything out it can affect how the REAL system will work.e If the test buffing starts to "gumball" the finish *something* was too cold, the lacquer skinned over - and solvents are trapped underneath.

    Also, your spray technique should be refined to the point where you go straight to buffing. Surface wet sanding is a "repair" operation, not a normal part of finishing. Professional finishers, techs that do sporadic finish work and spot finishing (both of whom often use aerosols for toners, spot work and such) only wet sand small runs - if any. Otherwise, it's finish completion and off to the buffing wheels the next day - or often within 3-4 hours for rush jobs.

    Hope that helps.
     
  12. s_tones

    s_tones Tele-Holic

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    Many good points there!
    I can't really spray in the "box" so I am constrained by the weather there, but generally I do get a nice afternoon window for spraying on most days.
    But it does make a swell place to keep her warm after. Kept it in there at 90 degrees after spraying after every round and then for about 3 days after final coats.
    Got a very nice finish. Will post pics soon when she's all assembled.
     
  13. Mase

    Mase Tele-Meister

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    It gets hard enough to polish, I've used it on surfboards.
     
  14. John Nicholas

    John Nicholas Friend of Leo's

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    I did the same, it's being shipped as we speak!

    You can cure it in the sun as well... just be careful with UV lights.

    I've used Solarez grain filler in the past. It was dry and I was sanding it within 10 minutes!! This stuff is tough!!

    Can't wait to test the "lacquer".
     
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