Grounding - No Pickguard, No Control Plate

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by nelsonizer, Jul 2, 2020.

  1. nelsonizer

    nelsonizer TDPRI Member

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    I am into my second build and I am preparing to wire up my guitar Tele-Deluxe style.
    The wiring diagrams seems pretty straightforward, but I am not clear on how the grounding and shielding would have to work since I am rear-routing the control plate and not using a pickguard with copper tape

    Ignore the knobs the picture. I changed the design to:
    Stacked 500k : Volume- Volume
    Stacked 500k : Tone - Tone
    Les-Paul Style 3-Way Switch
    Output Jack

    I am guessing that this would have to work similar to a Les Paul, where you must run a little jumper wire connecting the bridge or trem plate (aluminum) to the back of the volume pot? However, I see just as many forum posts where people don't do this.

    Would I have to do anything special because I am using stacked control knobs?

    - Thanks All

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I would put a ground wire from the bridge mounting bushing. Drill a hole into the control cavity using a 1/8" aircraft ( long) bit. at an angle. The long bit will keep the chuck from rubbing on the body and allow you a more acute angle.

    A stripped end of the conductor goes down into the hole before you tap the insert into the hole. That's how Gibson's are grounded with their bridges and tailpieces.

    see post 4

    https://www.mylespaul.com/threads/epiphone-dot-deluxe-grounding-issue.400152/


    I bet you could also put a wire under your trem as long as it is making metal to metal contact.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2020
  3. Peegoo

    Peegoo Friend of Leo's

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    Stacked control knobs require no special treatment.

    Line your control cavity with copper foil to improve RF noise rejection. If you're using metal-covered humbuckers that have shielded cables, there's no need to shield the pickup routs.
     
  4. Meteorman

    Meteorman Tele-Holic

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    your shielding foil should be grounded - if your pots impinge on your shielding, you're good - if not, drop a ground wire to it and spot solder it.
     
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  5. kbold

    kbold Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    To ground the bridge, perhaps a long bit to drill a hole from output jack (or control cavity if there's space) to bridge cavity.
    Otherwise, a copper strip running overland from the bridge to the bridge pickup cavity.
     
  6. physicsteach

    physicsteach TDPRI Member

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  7. nelsonizer

    nelsonizer TDPRI Member

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  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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  9. Peegoo

    Peegoo Friend of Leo's

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    That statement refers to ground bond between all metal hardware (bridge to control plate, control plate to metal pickup covers, shoelding to strings, etc.).

    You have a DMM? Set it to continuity beep and test for continuity across all hardware and shielding. A beep means your ground bond is good. No beep means there's no connection.
     
  10. nelsonizer

    nelsonizer TDPRI Member

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    Ok, I think I'm starting to get the hang of this.
    When I see these signals, it means go to ground, but all the diagrams just have the symbol hanging there.

    Where do I solder this wire?

    Back of one of the pots? Does it matter which one since they all have spots labeled ground. Or I have to run this ground wire to the bridge like we are discussing?

    I am getting the impression that proper grounding just means every metal part is in some way connected to every other metal part and the order doesn't matter.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    Back of the pots. All your grounds go there or end up there. Look at the diagram that Marty posted above. The pots are grounded together, the pickups are grounded to the pots as well as the jack. The only thing not shown is a ground wire from the bridge which goes to the back of a pot. As long as the pots are grounded together it doesn't matter which one you go to. Same with the Fralin drawing. The dotted lines are ground, the outside of the braided pickup wire is ground and it doesn't show a bridge ground wire. The simple rule for me is all grounds to a pot and ground the pots together.
     
  12. Peegoo

    Peegoo Friend of Leo's

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    If you didn't shield the little tunnel that runs to the output jack and you didn't use shielded wire to the jack, run two wires in parallel to the jack and twist them fairly snugly, three or four twists per inch. This is called a 'twisted pair', and it helps reject noise in a circuit that feeds a gain stage.
     
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