Grits! Love'm or hate'm?

Do you like grits?

  • Yes

    Votes: 120 82.2%
  • No

    Votes: 16 11.0%
  • maybe if I was starving

    Votes: 10 6.8%

  • Total voters
    146

Hamstein

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Northest Yorkshire
MMMmmmm, I love grits, it's another thing that's hard to get in the UK, it is ground cornmeal a bit like polenta, - and yet completely different!
 

0ct0Pr0n

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South Carolina
I've never heard of grits before. What is it/are they?

Grits are made from hominy - this is corn (maize) that's been cured with lime. It's an old process dating back to the pre-Columbian Americas.

The hominy is ground/milled, and you make porridge from the meal that results.

Not all grits are created equal. The instant/quick grits ain't it.

Stone-ground is best - the non-uniform size of the grits results in the best cooked texture.

it's impossible to cook them too long -- the longer you simmer them, the silkier they get. Just make sure to add liquid as needed (I make mine with 1:1 water and whole milk, then add cream or half and half as it simmers).

Putting anything sweet on grits is punishable by death in South Carolina.
 

0ct0Pr0n

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I'll add that if you live in uncivilized parts of the world, polenta, though not quite the same thing, is pretty damn close. Closer than quick and instant grits, to my taste buds. Just cook it like porridge instead of doing the log thing. Though we make grit-cakes here that are similar to baked polenta.

Friends from here who moved to Europe were able to keep themselves sane this way.
 

basher

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Washington, DC
I learned of a agricultural business in South Carolina that specializes in bringing back heirloom produce, Anson Mills, and the type of corn that has historically been used, is one of them, as well as Sea Island red peas and Carolina Gold rice. I decided to place an order, as several recipes that I had saved called for the peas, and others for the rice. Anson Mills posts some great recipes on their web site.

Anson Mills is great! I also order from Nora Mill Granary and Old Mill of Guilford.
 

bluesfordan

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Joined
Jun 1, 2006
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Location
Nashua NH
as a New Englander, I grew up with zero exposure to grits. I knew that it was part of a signature catch phrase of a sitcom waitress and that's about it.

on my first trip to South Carolina, I had breakfast at a Shoney's. I ordered scrambled eggs, hash browns and sausage. On my plate was this mysterious blob.

I asked the server "Hi, excuse me, but what is this on my plate?"

She busted out laughing "Oh, sugar, you ain't never seen grits before?"

I didn't dislike them, but they were oddly tasteless. I expected them to have some flavor. If I ever get to try them again, I might try putting pepper or hot sauce on them. I think people put butter on them, too.
 

yegbert

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Sep 28, 2004
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Location
Maryland
A couple years back we drove from Virginia down to Savannah...and back...on minor roads through North and South Carolinas.
The shrimp and grits we had along the way were awesome.

I was born in Loris, S.C. about an hour from the Grand Strand and now live in southern Maryland. An older sister still has the house in Loris where I grew up. When I go there to visit I like to start south on 301 until around Richmond, where I take 95 until around Fayetteville, then take 87 until just past Tarheel, then 131 to 410 and 701 to my (old) home town of Loris. The backroads “take me back home” figuratively and literally. It used to be tobacco fields I saw, now those seem to have been replaced by cotton. :)
 

KyAnne

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Oct 8, 2011
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Swamps of Louisiana
I love grits. I started eating them in my 20s when I realized it was cheaper than oatmeal. I'm lucky the stores even sell it this far north. Now my four year old loves them too. I like butter and paprika on mine, and sometimes a little egg yolk spilling over on them.
WUUUUUUUUUUUU!!!! That egg yolk on grits is a beautiful thing!
 

Ronzo

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South Florida, USA
All the Northerners need to be advised that they’ll be expected to shake the grits out of the Grit Tree before they’ll be served…
 

bottlenecker

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Joined
Dec 6, 2015
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Wisconsin
All the Northerners need to be advised that they’ll be expected to shake the grits out of the Grit Tree before they’ll be served…

Now where do you think most of those grit trees are located?
I just never knew that thing I was getting paid to do was called "shaking grits".
 

0ct0Pr0n

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I didn't dislike them, but they were oddly tasteless. I expected them to have some flavor. If I ever get to try them again, I might try putting pepper or hot sauce on them. I think people put butter on them, too.

Not properly seasoned. Salt, black pepper, and butter is all they really need.
 

Obsessed

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Montana
I've only tried them a few times but haven't been impressed. I'm in Oregon and they're not common so perhaps I've never had good grits.
Ditto for me too. I had them a few times working on projects in Mississippi. Meh. It is edible, but too man other options to choose from. Probably most people would say the same about my homemade oatmeal though, so maybe it has to do with what you grew up with.
 

KATT

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Essex, England
Grits are made from hominy - this is corn (maize) that's been cured with lime. It's an old process dating back to the pre-Columbian Americas.

The hominy is ground/milled, and you make porridge from the meal that results.

Not all grits are created equal. The instant/quick grits ain't it.

Stone-ground is best - the non-uniform size of the grits results in the best cooked texture.

it's impossible to cook them too long -- the longer you simmer them, the silkier they get. Just make sure to add liquid as needed (I make mine with 1:1 water and whole milk, then add cream or half and half as it simmers).

Putting anything sweet on grits is punishable by death in South Carolina.
Thanks. I want to try some now!
 

imwjl

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Joined
Mar 21, 2007
Posts
11,871
Location
My mom's basement.
Dozing off last night I thought this was asking if I loved or hated Girls. With morning and lunch caffeine I see it's grits. I'm fond of girls and grits but kind of picky - both need to be just right for me, and I prefer consumption at home.
 

Jared Purdy

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Jan 26, 2010
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Toronto, Ontario.
Anson Mills is great! I also order from Nora Mill Granary and Old Mill of Guilford.

Never heard of the other two, but I'll look them up. The first time I ordered from Anson, I actually got a phone call from Glenn Roberts, the owner of the company (who was interviewed in the Netflix documentary "High on the Hog). He wanted to know what my connection to his produce wsa given that I'm from Toronto, a long way from the south. I told him it started with my wife's and my "discovery" of Sapelo Island in Georgia back in the early 90's and that I follow a South Carolina chef who's mentioned Anson Mills in his Insta posts. Turns out that we know some of the same people who are or were responsible for the resurrection of these heirloom crops. Fascinating history. Yummy food.
 




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