Gretsch question

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by kelnet, Jun 24, 2019.

  1. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Hi guys. I tried a Gretsch G5122 today. It has a rosewood bridge. Does anyone here know if that's a floating bridge, and if so, does that present any problems that I should know about?
     
  2. jimash

    jimash Friend of Leo's

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    I believe that one is floating. It isn't a problem till you really flail it. Then it might move a bit. Locating it isn't that hard.
     
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  3. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    You mean the base is rosewood, right? like this
    [​IMG]

    ...with a chrome actual bridge setting atop, like this
    [​IMG]

    These generally are in fact floating. String tension *should* be sufficient to keep it in place
     
  4. 3-Chord-Genius

    3-Chord-Genius Poster Extraordinaire

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    Some people tack them down, but I think that's unnecessary.
     
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  5. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I owned a walnut G5122 for awhile, it has a floating bridge. I used violin rosin on the base to keep it from slipping, with 11s. I also sanded the base to match the top. Great guitar, made me feel like I had a Country Gent but with a smaller lower bout and a manageable neck heel.

    5AAB5A31-413D-4886-A2F9-59C3BDEDD9BE.jpeg
     
  6. jimash

    jimash Friend of Leo's

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    I have an old double cut 6120 that went a bit sideways on me during a performance. I was going to try double sided tape ,(yuck) but I found a tiny hole in the top, and a corresponding indentation on the bottom of the bridge foot, and was able to cut the head off a glasses hinge screw and invisibly pin one side. That nailed it.
     
  7. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    My 6118, the bridge would get whacked out of place from time to time, but I used to be quite a flailer. I used some double-sided tape and that cured it. I was worried about reduced "liveliness" but I found it to be a non-issue. I mean, that's already a rosewood base that any string vibrations would have to fight through, to make contact with the top.

    It's all in the FilterTrons
     
  8. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Yeah, I saw you mention it in some old threads, but I didn't want to go zombie, so I started this one. I was hoping you would see it.

    Did you find the guitar versatile enough for different styles? I didn't get to play it very long today.
     
  9. kubiakl

    kubiakl Tele-Meister

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    I bought a 5422T two years ago and it has little pins to hold the bridge in place. A buddy has the 5122 and his doesn't.

    I like the pins myself but his never gives him major trouble. Once you find the correct position for intonation you could use double-sided tape like blowtorch said, or just tape it down when you're changing strings so it doesn't shift.

    Depending on the price difference you might want to look at the newer models with the pins - they also have better pickups. His Gretschbuckers never sounded great, he wound up replacing them with some GFS Retrotrons.
     
  10. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    It was a bit of a howler, so loud volume and gain will have it’s practical limits. I replaced the Gretsch buckers with Filtertrons, in my case it was a HS Filtertron in the bridge and a TV Jones classic in the neck, a more versatile combo I guess. If you’re a Gibson HB fan you might the like the G-buckers, as they are pretty similar in construction, not sure about sound. I prefer high end twang, bright tones, so Filtertrons are my thing. If this idea appeals to you but modding doesn’t, then check out the G5422, a better guitar out the box, with Blacktop Filtertrons (Filtertron lite). More recent G5422s have ‘secured’ bridges, which is not the same as a pinned floating bridge. Think of it more as a steel post mounted ABR type bridge, the rosewood is merely cosmetic. Hope that helps ya.
     
  11. Glen W

    Glen W Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    You can also try a little rosin to make it a bit more grippy if it tends to move around.
     
  12. Dacious

    Dacious Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have a 97 Setzer Hotrod. Although people say the floating bridge is stable I found it a pain. I pinned it (some people use double-sided tape) very easy job.

    New Gretsches past I think 2015 have pinned bridges on the MIC and MIK stuff

    I use my 6120 at gigs with distortion and yes you do have to watch it for feedback but it's a great live guitar. Really cuts with chimy crunchy goodness. I fitted alnico 2 and 4 magnets to the stock Filtertrons - sounds great.

    I use the Bigsby a lot so I fitted a TOM-style roller bridge. Pins and roller - very stable with stock Grover G-badged tuners. Sounds great through every amp I've plugged it into, had interest from others to buy it.

    I love it - had a black 335 59 Dot Fatneck with aged finish/nickel, vintage PAFs in black, sold it once I got the Setzer. Everyone needs a Gretsch at least once.

    IMG_20190401_194139.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2019
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  13. knavel

    knavel Tele-Meister

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    I gigged Gretsches as a main instrument for 30 years before switching to a Telecaster. All vintage models are floating bridge.

    When I was younger and much more agressive I had examples with pinned bridges, double sided tape and fine grain sandpaper.

    All approaches worked well even with my Joe Strummer like playing. I suppose if I had to do it again in a stage of life where I cared about the finish under the bridge, I would consider violin rosin as suggested.
     
  14. DekeDog

    DekeDog Tele-Meister

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    I had one on my G6120N, and it was never a problem while strung. If you change all strings at once, then you'll have to reset the intonation. If the strings are exactly the same, and the intonation was set correctly on all previous strings, then you'll only have to reset the intonation on the first and sixth string. String changes get easier on the Bigsby once you get the hang of it. Place a 90 degree bend a quarter inch from the ball end and keep tension on the string while tightening.
     
  15. DavidP

    DavidP Friend of Leo's

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    A little bit of double sided tape is yer best friend in this situation. I could never keep that floater stable enough for my playing... YMMV, but this is easily reversed vs pinning.
     
  16. Cysquatch

    Cysquatch Tele-Meister

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    I second the recommendation for the blacktops. I have them in my 5420T and love them. Can get pretty sparkly and Filter'tron-y or plenty of standard humbucker growl with a little extra articulation to my ears. Everything about that guitar is just spot on. Excellent instrument.
     
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  17. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Thanks for the input everyone. The price was good, the guitar is gorgeous, and I liked how it felt, but the sound didn't knock me out. You guys have mentioned some other things that could bug me, so I just emailed the guy who was holding it for me, and told him I wasn't going to get it.

    I've been gassing for a Gretsch for some time, and now it's a weird thing to find what I wanted and then decide against it. I might just have to wait until a higher level model comes along.
     
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  18. bcorig

    bcorig Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Delicious
     
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  19. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Good move, IMHO. The G542xT are the better deal for a real-deal Gretsch with a full hollow body. The Electromatic G5622 seems very nice for a semi-hollow, but it overlaps with offerings by Guild, Epiphone and others. I once owned a couple G5420s and a MIJ G6120--if pickups are equal, there is very little to no appreciable difference between the two. One is just finished much better than the other.
     
  20. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Just as a little reset, having owned a 50s Gretsch when they were just used guitars and then having played many Korean and especially Japanese models in the last decade ?

    The only real vintage 50s models anyone should be pining for are the ones that have had extensive work done on them.

    I have a Chinese Corvette I’m wAiting to pick up and I know it plays better than my old ‘57 Country Club.
     
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