Graveyards / Cemeteries

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Eric Karonen, Mar 3, 2010.

  1. charlie chitlin

    charlie chitlin Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    My father's parents are planted there.
     
  2. gmann

    gmann Friend of Leo's

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    As a kid I used to hang out in cemetaries, not for morbid reasons or anything but I thought they were pretty cool, serene, quiet and yes a little spooky. The thing that most attracted me to them was the fact that so much history was there, if you took the time to read it. In Charleston S.C. there is a beautiful cemetary called Magnolia. It's on the Cooper River. Beautiful place with many of the graves going back 200 yrs or more. Alot of the history of Charleston can be found here. This cemetary contains the resting places of all 3 crews of the CSS Hunley, the 1st submarine to ever sink a warship in battle. This was during the Civil War. Also I used to spend alot of my summers in the mtns of N.C. and Tenn. when I was a kid. There are cemetaries in the Smoky Mtns National Park fm a time when it wasn't a national park. It's not used anymore but still maintained by the National Park Svc. Alot of these graves go way back in the 1800's. A thing I noticed and was always affected by was the birth and death dates on the graves, often no more than a yr or two apart. Also, many birth and death dates are the same date. Children died in childbirth or a few hrs later. Times were hard in the Mtns back then and the headstones tell the tale.
     
  3. dickey

    dickey Tele-Afflicted

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    The one in Boston is pretty fascinating. I think it's called "the Granary Burial grounds" where Paul Revere & Al Hamilton are buried.
     
  4. Eric Karonen

    Eric Karonen RIP

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    That is one cool graveyard, and if memory serves me right, it's beside the Boston Common. I used to visit it in 1970 on my way to the Combat Zone once in a while.
     
  5. TeleDrifter

    TeleDrifter Tele-Afflicted

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    Visited the war cemetary at Gallipolli in Turkey in 02. THis place brought tears to my eyes......
     
  6. 8painting

    8painting TDPRI Member

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    I live .25 Miles away from the local cemetery.

    I usually drive/walk through once every few months, like looking at all the really old headstones.

    Part of me thinks its kind of ridiculous that we have to dedicate places so serene to people who aren't even there to appreciate them.
     
  7. 64Strat

    64Strat Friend of Leo's Vendor Member

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    the serenity isn't for the benefit of those that are six feet under, it's for those still treading on the surface.




    I'm surprised nobody has brought up Arlington National Cemetery. An amazing place that will really touch your soul.

    Anybody see the documentary called "Section 60" on HBO about ANC?
     
  8. bo

    bo Poster Extraordinaire

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    I did, but sorta obliquely. It's great when the tourist season is over.
     
  9. DennisMc

    DennisMc Tele-Meister

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    I grew up in one, and worked there from age 14-20. My dad is the caretaker (50 yrs this January).
    Besides my dad's cemetery, my biggest memories of being in a cemetery are my Ancestors family plots in Tipperary Ireland, and Gettysburg PA.
     

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  10. Telarkaster

    Telarkaster Friend of Leo's

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    Higgy, that's a good question and no, it's not a typo. The older cemeteries in Montreal were dug up as room was needed to expand the city. My favourite Montreal historian Edgar Andrew Collard (author the column "All our yesterdays) explains:

    http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~qcmtl-w/downtowncemeteries.htm

    Catholics and Protestants both established new cemeteries beyond the walls. Neither foresaw how rapidly the city would grow. Much of the new Catholic cemetery acquired in 1799 is now Dominion Square and Place du Canada. Much of the new Protestant cemetery is now the complexe Guy Favreau. Meanwhile the erection of buildings, where the old cemeteries "within the walls" had been, unearthed the remains that had been left. As the demand for real estate on St. James Street increased, many of the first buildings erected were torn down and replaced by bigger ones.

    The urban legend is that to this day every time there is landscape or roadwork around Dominion Square old bones are dug up. Hard to believe if you've ever sat in Dominion Square in the heart of downtown, surrounded by all those buildings.

    Some say that the older poorer cemeteries in the east end weren't even dug up, that they were simply built upon...
     
  11. Dan German

    Dan German Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Thanks, Telarkaster! So the cemetery is not as old as the bodies!

    The nearest graveyard to me is at the Anglican cathedral. Until 1850, there was no Presbyterian church, so everybody went to the Anglican church, and services were modified. When it became a cathedral, the new Bishop decided to consecrate the churchyard, which would have meant no more Presbyterians buried there. They weren't really happy about not being able to be buried with family, but the Bishop was pretty stubborn about it. The HBC Governor Eden Colvile (an Anglican himself) pointed out that the churchyard was only on one side of the church, and perhaps the Bishop could turn around and do his consecrating in the other direction.

    The most interesting grave (to me) is that of Samuel Bedson. He rose from Quartermaster Sergeant in the 2d Quebec Rifles to Warden of Manitoba's first Penitentiary, built Manitoba's first golf course (gotta keep those prisoners busy), and was eventually appointed Aide-de-Camp to the Governor General. Unfortunately, just after he arrived in Ottawa to take the job, he died. He was so popular here in Winnipeg that his body was shipped back from Ottawa for burial.
     
  12. arakele

    arakele Tele-Holic

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    Grandview cemetery in Johnstown, PA is really nice, I have some family buried there.

    Historic Oakwood cemetery in Raleigh, NC is nice as well, a lot of local history in there. There are 3 or so historic cemeteries in down town Raleigh.
     
  13. 64Strat

    64Strat Friend of Leo's Vendor Member

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    my parents are at rest there.... have spent many an hour there.
     
  14. Scott deC.

    Scott deC. TDPRI Member

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    I Am a Gravedigger!

    I have been a gravedigger for 20 years. Peaceful work. But when I travel I like to do a little research and find some celebrity graves in the area. I've stood at the grave of Johnny, Elvis, Jimi and Leo to mention a few. Does anyone know why there is not a marker on Leo's first wifes grave. He is buried beside her at Fairhaven in Santa Ana... Another of lifes mysteries.
    Great Topic. I know more about Boneyards than Teles, but sure am learning alot from you all!
     
  15. 8painting

    8painting TDPRI Member

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    I know, I should have pointed out the irony that these aren't frequented by people more often for this fact.
     
  16. 6942

    6942 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Animal cemeteries can be interesting also.
    I've seen bigger and more ornate headstones, than in human ones.
    People who never had a good dog/cat, will NEVER understand the unique bond between creatures of a different species?

    Steve
     
  17. Tdub

    Tdub Friend of Leo's

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    This is outside the Houchens grocery store where my mom shopped when I was a kid. I never really thought about how odd this is. I don't really know the story behind this, but a shopping center was built around this small gravesite. Some of the graves date to the 1800's. This is in Elizabethtown, KY.
     

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  18. E5RSY

    E5RSY Doctor of Teleocity

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    Here's a few from that little cemetery I mentioned above near Leander, TX. I noticed today that the place is half kids. It just tears me up, especially the last one below (mother-daughter).

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  19. Stevie 202

    Stevie 202 Tele-Afflicted

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    :p
    they're all bone orchards to me!
     
  20. Stevie 202

    Stevie 202 Tele-Afflicted

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    :p
    Naw your way's better.
    You got all the green leafy stuff outside the cemetary where the live people are, and all the paved and concrete stuff inside where the dead guys are.
    Much better.
    :p
     
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