Grateful Dead question...

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by beninma, Apr 26, 2019.

  1. ScubaGeek

    ScubaGeek Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    291
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2016
    Location:
    Someplace called Ohio
    Yeah, the written part of Slipknot is a bit tricky, and I do have one show on tape, I think from '93 or '94, where Jerry totally botches it. But if I recall correctly, didn't they go through long stretches where they didn't do Slipknot. I believe they only did it a couple times in '78, then dropped it until '83. They after doing it a few more times, they dropped it again until '89. But you do have a point that after '89, they did play it regularly until Jerry went home.
    Yeah, apart from my first show (I never did get a copy of my second show) and what's on the various official releases, I don't really listen to stuff from the 90's much anymore. There's a few shows I heard about in the 90's, like the ones with David Murray or Ornette Coleman, or the show where there was some sort of Tubular Bells allusion in Space, and the Gyuto Monks thing at the one show...was it '95? I know there's a comment in one of the Deadhead Taper's Compendium books where it's mentioned that the Gyuto Monks was one of the most profound moments in any Dead show ever, with one of the low points occurring a few minutes later, when Weir launched into Easy Answers. So I imagine those shows I might listen to if I had them.
     
    raysachs likes this.
  2. Chip

    Chip Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    51
    Posts:
    1,767
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2005
    Location:
    Macedonia, Ohio
    Can you guys do me favor and listen to some of this show? It’s from March 20, 1994 at the Richfield Coliseum. I think this show stacks up with any in the 90’s. The energy of the band and the crowd was unmatched and I’m not saying that because I was in the tenth row.

    Please give it a spin and tell me if I’m crazy

    https://archive.org/details/gd94-03-20.schoeps.ladner.15464.sbeok.shnf
     
  3. raysachs

    raysachs Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    2,020
    Joined:
    May 21, 2017
    Location:
    Near Philly
    You're not crazy at all, but being there DID have something to do with it! I had a tape of that show back when you needed tapes. That's about as good as they got in '94. I was pretty connected to the tape trading network and when word came down of a good show, I'd usually have it within a couple of weeks. If they suddenly reappeared in that form today and I could get a ticket to that, I'd be all over getting one. And if I was there, I'd have had a total blast and left with an ear to ear grin. I felt that way about some of the later '94 and '95 shows I was at that weren't this good. It was about as good as they got in those days.

    But part of what you're hearing is the recording - that's a REALLY good audience tape, and while soundboard tapes generally were better sound quality than AUD tapes, a really good AUD tape is something to be treasured because the music sounds really good, just a little bit shy of a soundboard, but the energy and sound of the audience on the tape takes the whole experience to another level. It's much closer to being there than just listening to a clean recording of it. This is a great live recording... As you say, "the energy of the band and the crowd" came through exceptionally well partly because if was a great night and partly because of the recording.

    All of that said, listening to big chunks of this late last night and this morning, I enjoyed it a lot. BUT, if I was in the mood to listen to some Grateful Dead, I'd be either going for something from the 70s or late 60s, or I might be grabbing a recording of a show I was at. But probably nothing after about '87. I love listening to shows I was at because it brings back memories that I'd probably never access without the recordings. Some of the Red Rocks shows in the early '80s, a show in San Francisco shortly after Jerry came back in January '87 and a show with Dylan in Eugene in the summer of '87. But other than shows I was at, it's VERY rare for me to pull out an '80s show - there was an '83 show from Merriweather Post Pavilion in Maryland that was a particular favorite - another AMAZING audience recording. But even though the Dead were a really solid live act for most of the time Jerry was alive, their earlier stuff was often transcendently good (and occasionally godawful terrible - you pay yer money you take yer chances). And I don't hear much from later that was.

    I didn't see them from '88 until '93 (that's when our kids were tiny and all-consuming) and then I saw them a lot until Jerry died, but it wasn't because they were anywhere close to what they'd been, it was just because I thought they were kind of a national treasure, I didn't think they'd be touring much longer, they'd been a big part of my life, and I just wanted to soak it up while I could. By the time I saw them at RFK in the summer of '95, the scene had gotten so ugly and out of hand and the music was so rarely even decent that I'd decided I wasn't going back even if they toured again that Fall, which of course they couldn't do. Jerry picked the right time, if not the right WAY, to shut that mess down. I have some fine memories from the '94 and even '95 shows I was at, but I haven't listened to any of them in probably 20 years at this point...
     
    Chip likes this.
  4. bluesfordan

    bluesfordan Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,726
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2006
    Location:
    Nashua NH
    I was wondering. Back when TRI opened up, they were doing a lot of web broadcast shows from there and I enjoyed them tremendously. Sound was beyond fantastic. I haven't gotten any emails from them in a couple years now. Does anybody know what happened? Are they still showing live stuff?
     
  5. ScubaGeek

    ScubaGeek Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    291
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2016
    Location:
    Someplace called Ohio
    BTW, another issue I have with the Dead during the 90's, was when they stopped using speakers onstage. They started running all the guitars through "speaker emulators" and direct into the soundboard. I gather these days, you can very nice guitar tones under such circumstances, but circa 1993-1994, not so much. At least, not judging by the tapes I've heard from that era. Weir, Jerry, and Phil all have really sterile tones, a far cry from what they had in the 70's.

    But then, Weir had been using these sickly thin guitar tones since at least the early 80's, and Phil...I dunno, I just feel like he dropped off the radar a little bit after the mid 70's. That's another reason I like about those early 70's shows was listening to him playing the occasional bass solo (ok, more than occasional, given how often they played Eyes Of The World circa 73-74, and each one with a bass solo in it). While I suppose he still continued his "whale song" approach to bass playing (That's what Jerry likened Phil to, like he was playing a whale song, one long melody that lasted through each song), he seemed to content to do it in a more inconspicuous fashion. Oh well.
     
  6. Charlie Bernstein

    Charlie Bernstein Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,317
    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2003
    Location:
    Augusta, Maine
    Lots of interesting answers above. I'll add this. None of the Dead really took charge of a song. They all listened to each other and played off each other. If someone started something new, the rest of them followed the thread - even on simple two-chord songs. The way they always put it was: the music plays the band.

    But every song had a signature motif. That's what to look for.

    Since Jerry, Bob has kind of become the music director, but I wouldn't tell the other guys that.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.