Grandparents' cars.

Greggorios

Poster Extraordinaire
Gold Supporter
Joined
Jun 18, 2016
Posts
5,855
Location
NY
My "G-Pa", like any self respecting gramps, drove a Crowne Vic:

 

David Barnett

Doctor of Teleocity
Ad Free Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2003
Posts
17,360
Age
65
Location
The Far-Flung Isles of Langerhans

Driver3

Tele-Meister
Joined
Nov 4, 2010
Posts
403
Location
Coboconk, Ontario
My maternal grandfather bought a 66 Mustang in Sauterne Gold, 289 auto.
Nice car. Grandma made him sell it because he drove it too fast.

1965_00075_01.jpg


He then bought a 67 Fairlane 500 convertible Red, black top, 289 auto.
Awesome car. The top was never lowered until they were visiting us in Florida.
I talked grandpa into lowering the top...grandma didn't realize it was a convertible till then. She about s..t!


1967-Ford-Fairlane-GTA-convert.jpg

Not his cars, representative examples.
 

Bob Womack

Friend of Leo's
Joined
May 28, 2016
Posts
2,255
Location
Between Clever and Stupid
My maternal grandfather drove a blue '54 Mercury Monterey for the entire time I knew him:
1280px-1954_Mercury_Monterey_%2835552856831%29.jpg


My paternal grandfather died in 1941 in a construction accident. He dated my grandmother in a buckboard pulled by a horse. My wife's grandfather dated her mother in his Stutz Bearcat.
1918-stutz-bearcat-rumble-seat-roadster-front.jpg


I think my father and mother's first car together was a Kaiser Henry J. Whatever it was, after he bought it he discovered that it had cable-pull brakes, like a bicycle. He decided that simply wasn't reliable enough for his lovely new bride so he designed, built, and installed his own hydraulic brake system.

My dad was an absolute sports car nut. He had a knack for finding down-on-their luck cars and rehabilitating them. The apex of his madness was an Alfa GTV6 like this one that he bought for pennies on the dollar and rehabbed.
1986_alfa_romeo_gtv6_158923151753ebc801fb71AC7E9AC6-FE38-4188-B68D-DB5004C6A82B.jpeg


Bob
 

CharlieO

Friend of Leo's
Ad Free Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2003
Posts
3,154
Location
Sarasota, FL
This is a rather long story about my grandfather's cars. My grandfather on my father's side started out as a Ford man. In fact, as a child he knew the Ford family and in his teens (1908) he went to work at Ford's Piquette Avenue plant as a draftsman. He then studied to be an engineer, came back in 1917 and and worked his way up in the company to supervise the construction of various manufacturing plants until Henry called him into his office on a Friday in 1928 and told him that he was sending him to Fordlandia in the Amazon on Monday. The assignment would have meant leaving my grandmother and his four young sons for a minimum of two years. He declined the assignment, and that was the end of his employment at the Ford Motor Company.

That's bit of background, now on to the cars. One of my grandfather's first assignments was drafting plans for the Model T. I have a copy of a blueprint on the wall next to me with his initials noting changes that he had made on various dates as the car was modified during the production run. I believe that my grandfather may have owned a couple of Model T's, and my Dad used to talk about one that they had at their cottage in the 1920s. My Dad also talked about the thrill of Grandpa bringing home one of the first Model A's in 1927, months before anyone else in Detroit had one. That may have been a company car, because Grandpa had a 1927 Buick. Henry would not allow him to park it outside the factory where people might see it, so he got a parking spot inside the building.

1927 Buick:
1927-buick-sedan-model-120.jpg


After his separation from Ford, my grandfather continued to be a loyal Buick man. The earliest Buick that I can remember was an early 1950s Roadmaster. He must have had that car when I was born in 1952 and kept it for a few years.

1951 Buick Roadmaster
1951_buick_roadmaster-pic-31449-640x480.jpeg


I think I recall a 1959 Buick 4 door.
1959_Buick_Electra_225_4-door_hardtop_General_Motors_RESIZED_1.jpeg


And his last car was a 1961 Electra that he owned when he moved in with us after Grandma died. That is probably the only one of his cars that I ever rode in. All I remember about it was the smell of his pipe and the burns in the front seat.

1961 Buck Electra
1961 buick electra.jpg


These are not actual photos of his cars, of course. I'm enjoying looking at them, though, and thinking about him. He has been gone for almost 60 years.
 
Last edited:

Bendyha

Friend of Leo's
Silver Supporter
Joined
Mar 26, 2014
Posts
3,130
Location
Northern Germany
The only car I recall him having was an Austin Morris 1100 (this is someone else's gramps in the photo)
1641931454322.png

More interesting was some of the planes he flew.

Vickers F.B.5
1641931576834.png


The Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.8
1641931674952.png


BE2E

1641931779902.png


Avro 504

1641931861202.png


Sopwith Camel
1641932103112.png


And, as noted on his R.F.C. record book, about a dozen others up to July 1918.
1641932197134.png

Like me, he was never too interested in automobiles.
 

imwjl

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Mar 21, 2007
Posts
11,863
Location
My mom's basement.
This is a rather long story about my grandfather's cars. My grandfather on my father's side started out as a Ford man. In fact, as a child he knew the Ford family and in his teens (1908) he went to work at Ford's Piquette Avenue plant as a draftsman. He then studied to be an engineer, came back in 1917 and and worked his way up in the company to supervise the construction of various manufacturing plants until Henry called him into his office on a Friday in 1928 and told him that he was sending him to Fordlandia in the Amazon. The assignment would have meant leaving my grandmother and his four young sons for a minimum of two years. He declined the assignment, and that was the end of his employment at the Ford Motor Company.

That's bit of background, now on to the cars. One of my grandfather's first assignments was drafting plans for the Model T. I have a copy of a blueprint on the wall next to me with his initials noting changes that he had made on various dates as the car was modified during the production run. I believe that my grandfather may have owned a couple of Model T's, and my Dad used to talk about one that they had at their cottage in the 1920s. My Dad also talked about the thrill of Grandpa bringing home one of the first Model A's in 1927, before anyone else in town had one. That may have been a company car, because Grandpa had a 1927 Buick. Henry would not allow him to park it outside the factory where people might see it, so he got a parking spot inside the building.

1927 Buick: View attachment 939128

After his separation from Ford, my grandfather continued to be a loyal Buick man. The earliest Buick that I can remember was an early 1950s Roadmaster. He must have had that car when I was born in 1952 and kept it for a few years.

1951 Buick Roadmaster View attachment 939134

I think I recall a 1959 Buick 4 door. View attachment 939137

And his last car was a 1961 Electra that he owned when he moved in with us after Grandma died. That is probably the only one of his cars that I ever rode in. All I remember about it was the smell of his pipe and the burns in the front seat.

1961 Buck Electra View attachment 939142

These are not actual photos of his cars, of course. I'm enjoying looking at them, though, and thinking about him. He has been gone for almost 60 years.
The '59 is what my grandmother had before those Wildcats. I remember it visually but not the way I do the later models.

Until 1972 my parents would buy the dealer demos or cars that were dealer owner family and that included a 1962 green Electra 225.

Not long ago I caught the Rare Classic Cars YouTube guy mentioning Oldsmobile as having better or more advanced suspension than Pontiac in the '60s and some of my elders' contemporaries had that as their favorite but I was also certain the '73 Grand Am was a first for "radial tuned" suspension. The Grand Am started out as a pretty cool car vs the versions with most recognition that were poster children for GM's craptacular mediocrity.

These days other competition including the Koreans makes me wonder if GM will ever get back to product quality, innovation and design that can rival their past. I applaud Mary Barra regardless.
 

boris bubbanov

Tele Axpert
Ad Free Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2007
Posts
55,976
Location
New Orleans, LA + in the
This is me as a young lad standing by my grandparents '52 Chevrolet two tone Deluxe with a 6 cylinder. They lived on a farm in northern Wisconsin. Stick on the steering column. Starter button. Beautiful herringbone wool bench seats. Vacuum powered wipers that would pause under heavy acceleration. Tires had innertubes. It had a 6-volt battery that would be removed in the winter and kept warm in the house so it would start in the periods of deepest cold.

It came into my possession in the early '70s while I was in college. At that time it only had 27,000 miles on it. I took it on a road trip from Chicago to New York and I took the route through Ontario Canada. When I re-entered the US, the friendly US customs service searched the car for drugs. After they emptied the contents of the car on the ground and removed the back seat they said "OK, you can go now."

View attachment 938746

Very similar to the first car my maternal grandfather had, when I was born.

In Niagara County, at the International Crossing, we saw vehicles all but entirely dismantled, all the time. The most obvious target was the VW Microbus. The joke was, my schoolmate and great friend Mark bought a "Bus" because he didn't wanna be the guy driving across the border on the many, many day trips we took over into adjacent Canada. None of us wanted to test the odds, that we'd lose the entire day to reassembling that VW. But I don't know; given that we were local kids, they probably would have left us alone anyway.
 

CharlieO

Friend of Leo's
Ad Free Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2003
Posts
3,154
Location
Sarasota, FL
These days other competition including the Koreans makes me wonder if GM will ever get back to product quality, innovation and design that can rival their past. I applaud Mary Barra regardless.
GM has come a long way back already. I first became aware of it when I bought my first Volt. There is no question about the level of innovation involved, and while they had to cut some corners on that car to keep costs in line, I was impressed by fit and finish and reliability of both Volts. I saw the same thing when I began shopping for C7 Corvettes and compared them to the C6. My impression continues to be positive with my Cadillac ELR. It's just a fancy Volt, but the paint quality is beautiful and the interior is as good as most expensive imports of that year (2016.) And of course, it beats Telsa by a wide margin for fit and finish.
 

boris bubbanov

Tele Axpert
Ad Free Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2007
Posts
55,976
Location
New Orleans, LA + in the
My maternal grandfather drove a blue '54 Mercury Monterey for the entire time I knew him:
1280px-1954_Mercury_Monterey_%2835552856831%29.jpg


My paternal grandfather died in 1941 in a construction accident. He dated my grandmother in a buckboard pulled by a horse. My wife's grandfather dated her mother in his Stutz Bearcat.
1918-stutz-bearcat-rumble-seat-roadster-front.jpg


I think my father and mother's first car together was a Kaiser Henry J. Whatever it was, after he bought it he discovered that it had cable-pull brakes, like a bicycle. He decided that simply wasn't reliable enough for his lovely new bride so he designed, built, and installed his own hydraulic brake system.

My dad was an absolute sports car nut. He had a knack for finding down-on-their luck cars and rehabilitating them. The apex of his madness was an Alfa GTV6 like this one that he bought for pennies on the dollar and rehabbed.
1986_alfa_romeo_gtv6_158923151753ebc801fb71AC7E9AC6-FE38-4188-B68D-DB5004C6A82B.jpeg


Bob
Some nice cars, Bob!

The Henry J had hydraulic brakes, just like every other model that K-F sold. Only the emergency brake was cable operated and yes, those could slow a light car like that if you lost a master or wheel cylinder. Same master cylinder assembly as the full sized Kaisers.

I restored a number of these Kaisers - I was even in the Kaiser Frazer Owners Club for over a decade and attended the annual convention in 1972 in Anaheim and another in Dearborn, MI in 1976 I think.

Was it a Crosley, instead? Think about it: Henry Kaiser wanted to offer this compact car on the cheap, and so he used as many vehicle systems from existing Kaiser models as he possibly could. It would've been a bear to reverse engineer the hydraulics out of a car that in many ways was just a decontented Kaiser Special or Manhattan.
 
Last edited:

Muddyshoes

Tele-Holic
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Posts
584
Age
63
Location
Twilight zone
I had a 64 Buick Wildcat in 1977 to 1980 just like your picture but in blue. I was 18 at the time, best party car load up and off we go.
 

Flaneur

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
May 24, 2010
Posts
5,944
Location
Scotland
My Grandparents couldn't afford cars, even though I grew up in a city where vehicles were built and ownership was unusually common.
My Father didn't learn to drive, until he was 52. I didn't drive regularly, until I was in my late '30s. I guess we all had better uses for our savings. I still think of a car as a convenience, rather than a prize, or status symbol.
 

rghill

Tele-Afflicted
Gold Supporter
Joined
Oct 16, 2007
Posts
1,966
Location
Peoria, AZ
My maternal Grandfather was a Plymouth man. The car I remember the most was a huge boat of a 1970's Plymouth Fury, kind of like this:

1920px-1971_Plymouth_Fury_II_4-door_sedan,_front_left_(Hershey_2019).jpg

Big 383 propelled the green sled pretty well. Chrysler AC would freeze your toes off.
I remember driving the car and almost getting it airborne off a sudden drop in the road.

Paternal Grandmother always had to have a Chevrolet Caprice, like this one:

1984_chevrolet_caprice-pic-29448-640x480.jpeg

Pathetically underpowered as all 1980's cars, it at least rode nicely.

Paternal Grandfather usually drove a farm truck - I remember an old 1949 or so GMC and later a Dodge with a 318.
 

tubedude

Tele-Afflicted
Silver Supporter
Joined
Jul 26, 2013
Posts
1,068
Location
east georgia
My grandfather bought a new '65 289 Mustang on his 75th birthday. He could be seen cruising the city streets with his pipe and in his hounds tooth touring cap, like some old codger having a mid/old-life crisis. My mother got that car when he bought a new caddie, and I put it out of its misery when I inherited it during my freshman year in college in '71.
Where's the sad imogeeeee?
 

David Barnett

Doctor of Teleocity
Ad Free Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2003
Posts
17,360
Age
65
Location
The Far-Flung Isles of Langerhans
The Henry J had hydraulic brakes, just like every other model that K-F sold. Only the emergency brake was cable operated and yes, those could slow a light car like that if you lost a master or wheel cylinder. Same master cylinder assembly as the full sized Kaisers.

The Kaiser Darrin was essentially a Henry J with a cute little fiberglass body, wasn't it?
 

tubedude

Tele-Afflicted
Silver Supporter
Joined
Jul 26, 2013
Posts
1,068
Location
east georgia
All my grandparents were unencumbered by either house or car ownership. Maternal grandparents were born in 1899 and 1901, paternal grandparents a few years later. If they missed the bus back from Leeds, they would think nothing of walking the five miles back home rather than wait an hour for the next one.

My dad bought his first car in his early thirties. A Reliant Regal (saloon version of the Trotters yellow van), bought because as a three wheeler he could drive it on his motorcycle license, and it was taxed as a motorcycle. He borrowed £10 from his parents in order to buy, so that would be the nearest any of them came to owning a car. I don't think that he ever bought a car younger than ten years old, sometimes twenty, until aged almost 70 he bought a new boy racer Corsa SRI. He had to sell it three years later when mum died of a heart attack whilst sitting in the passenger seat, replacing it with a two year old Corsa which he drove until I took his keys away. My youngest then drove it for five years until she emigrated.

As a student only one person on my course owned a car, on graduating I lived in London for six years where a car was a liability rather than an asset. I only learnt to drive after leaving London aged thirty. I bought a roof rack capable of holding two tandems and two racing bikes, then found a car to fit. I drove my wife to the maternity hospital, with learner driver "L" plates, and a bike on the roof rack. It's a box with a wheel at each corner, designed to get you from A to B.
Those vehicles don't belong outside of the carnival.
 

Mjark

Doctor of Teleocity
Silver Supporter
Joined
Feb 14, 2011
Posts
14,801
Location
Annapolis, MD
My grandfather also had a Model T he made into a pick up of sorts. He used to drive my brothers and cousins around the farm in it.

My dad’s parents cars don’t really stick out in my memory. They may have had a yellow Rambler at one point.
 




Top